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Found 91 results

  1. This specimen of a possibly new crab (galatheoid? or homolodromid?) from southern Vancouver Island has been sent, for study and description, to Torrey Nyborg at Loma Linda University in California. The specimen is to be donated to the Royal British Columbia Museum in Victoria, BC. I will update the forum once I've heard back from Torrey on the status of the specimen. Torrey has also expressed interest in a number of other decapod crustaceans collected in association with this specimen. So those fossils may eventually make their way (two already have) to him for description and potential donation to the RBCM.
  2. This is another piece discovered at an estate sale, which of course means I do not have the info such as location it was found, etc. It has some amazing detail, spiny legs? but it's so squished into the matrix I have no idea what it could be. Hope to receive more info. The piece is approx. 6 x 4"
  3. ID please?

    Could someone please ID this fossil from Charmouth, England? It looks like some sort of crustacean. Two of these were found in the same rock. The other one is being acid prepped.
  4. West Texas Trip

    Well, I returned from my West Texas hiatus a few days ago, and have had time to process some of my finds. These were primarily found in the Terlingua area. Some ammonites - not sure if any prep work can expose more on these. Also some belemnitella, I think, and possibly a crab? Please let me know your thoughts. I believe these came from the Boquillas formation, but I am not entirely certain. There is a LOT of rock in West Texas.
  5. Hi all I found these two fossils in Post Oak Creek (Sherman, TX) today and would appreciate any input as to what they are. My guess on the first one is that it is part of a turtle shell, and the second one is part of a crustacean. Thanks!
  6. Hey, I'm just starting out and I wanted to know, what preparation tools and tactics will work best for removing limestone without damaging the specimen? (Preferably low budget) I also don't have a lot of workspace since I'm just taking a crack at this legitamate, fine-detail stuff for the first time; and after some research on air scribes, abrasives, and erasers, I realize they are much too costly and the whole air system and workbox takes up a lot of room I don't have. So is there anything you all could recommend for me?
  7. https://phys.org/news/2018-11-tiny-ancient-fossil-evidence-life.html
  8. Palaeopalaemon newberryi Chagrin shale Devonian Northeast Ohio, USA Specimens were used in the publication “Morphology and paleoecology of the oldest lobster-like decapod, Palaeopalaemon newberryi Whitfield, 1880”, Journal of Crustacean Biology (2018). Smithsonian USNM (United States National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC, USA). USNM numbers 617309 617308 617309 618374 706118 Morphology and paleoecology of the oldest lobster-like decapod, Palaeopalaemon newberryi .pdf PP letter of provenance.pdf
  9. Palaeopalaemon newberryi Chagrin shale Devonian Northeast Ohio, USA Specimens were used in the publication “Morphology and paleoecology of the oldest lobster-like decapod, Palaeopalaemon newberryi Whitfield, 1880”, Journal of Crustacean Biology (2018). Smithsonian USNM (United States National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC, USA). USNM numbers 617309 617308 617309 618374 706118 Morphology and paleoecology of the oldest lobster-like decapod, Palaeopalaemon newberryi .pdf PP write upx.pdf
  10. Crustacean fossils found in childhood

    Here are 3 crustacean fossils I found when I was younger and held onto them because I thought they were the coolest things ever. They were all found in the Ottawa area. There is also one other fossil which I’m not positive what it is. It sort of looks like a tony bone or a bit of coral. Helping to ID these would be so cool if possible!
  11. As I was putting together labels with photos containing microscopic images of inclusions in coprolites, I came across something that I may have misidentified as a fish tail and vertebrae in a very small coprolite. After looking at it again, the tail looks more like a shrimp or crawfish tail than that of a fish. What I thought were fish vertebrae, look more like crustacean arm joints/elements. Can anyone please confirm this for me? Thanks a bunch! Formation: Oxford Clay (Jurassic - Callovian) Location: Orton Pit, near Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England
  12. Squashed Mazon Creek Crustacean?

    This is another piece from the Mazon Creek Chowder Flats site, it was shattered into quite a few pieces, but I was able to reassemble it. However, I can't tell what it is. I am certain it is some kind of crustacean, based on the texture and color of the shell and the presence of a long segmented antenna. But it seems to be rather flattened, and I can't make out many other details. There does appear to a segmented piece extending from the top edge of the blob to the edge of the nodule, but I can't make out any clear segments or limbs. The shape is reminiscent of Mamayocaris, perhaps just a poorly preserved one? The only other Essex Fauna crustacean that seems to roughly match the squat shape is the rare Dithyrocaris.
  13. This is part 2, site 2 of my Memorial day fossil hunting trip. You can see the site one report here: I chose to drive out to Denton Creek north of Ft. Worth. I had been there before, but had not gotten to explore the area. It was the takeout point from a kayaking trip I’d taken down the creek a few weeks before. It took me 30 minutes out to drive out there from the first location I hunted in Benbrook. If you pass the creek going north you can go up to the next exit and then loop back to the creek. There is a little rock and dirt path off the shoulder of the road that leads down to under the bridge where you can drive your vehicle. The hill down to under the bridge is kind of steep. My car was a bit on the low side for getting over the curb and then a steep embankment with rocks. I bottomed out once. I thought I might park my car in the shade under the bridge, but when I arrived there was another vehicle in the area. I thought I was the only person crazy enough to be out here in the heat. Nobody could pass if I parked under the bridge so I pulled through into a small clearing there. The grass and weeds were grown up pretty high in the clearing. I knew of a sizeable exposure on the creek that I wanted to try to get to on foot, but I didn’t know the terrain around the creek. I switched to my rubber boots for walking in the creek. I reapplied sunscreen and headed down the steep hill to the edge of the creek. I had to sit down and scoot myself over the edge and drop down to the rock ledge that ran along the creek. I inspected the exposure. Last time I was here I found a pretty decent Macraster obesus right by the spot I came in by. I didn’t see a single fossil. The creek was maybe 40 feet wide give or take. The water was less than 10 inches deep where I entered the creek. I don’t think the creek is ever a high energy creek. The rocks that are in this part of the creek are angular and jagged. The water in the creek is rather murky so you can’t see into the water. All of that makes it a difficult creek to walk in. Most of the creek in that spot is one level at bedrock with rocks scattered across much of the creek bottom. There is a narrow jagged rift in the bedrock that meanders along the creek bed. The water is deeper in the rift. I walked down into the creek and squatted down looking at some ammonite fragments in the creek. I saw two butterflies nearby. I tried to get a better picture from the side, but they flew away before I could do so. Sorry it is not a very clear picture. You can see the creek bed is kind of slimy looking. In some areas where the water was very low it looked foul and fetid. It had a green bubbly looking surface. I assessed the creek and decided to walked along the exposed rock ledge above the creek. As I walked up the creek there was a horrible stench of something dead. The further I went the worse it got. Finally I came upon a gar fish carcass on the rock ledge above the creek. It was close to one of the places where I had wanted to have a look around, but the odor was too strong and repulsive. It looked to be just over 3 feet long. I can’t imagine how it got there. It had to be a person who had drug it there. This section of the creek does not seem deep enough for such a large fish to swim in. Maybe it swam in the rift though. There were deeper sections of the creek where it could live, but not here. There were signs of racoons all over along with remnants of their meals. Evidently gar is not on the racoon menu, which was surprising to me since it seems raccoons will eat almost anything else. I looked at the thin, razor sharp gar teeth. It is kind of scary to think that type of critter was in this creek when I kayaked it. I was in and out of the water all the time. A bite from that thing would be nasty. Here is a pic of it. I walked back down the creek upon the rock ledge to a place where there weren’t too many jagged rocks in the creek and where the rift in the creek would be narrow enough for me to step across it. Since the water was flowing slowly the rocks were covered with algae and were very slippery. I got to the rift. There were rocks pilled up there. I place one foot on a large one sitting at an angle and it tottered underneath me. I made sure my foot wouldn’t slip and I balanced myself as I put my next foot on another rock. It tottered too. To slip and fall in this creek with all the jagged rocks would really hurt and might do considerable injury. At least when I slipped and fell in the NSR the riverbed was smooth, without any rocks. I took a few more steps on similar rocks and I was I on smooth riverbed again near the other bank. I began to inspect the exposure. I found these just sitting on the bank. A cute little impression of an ammonite and what appeared to be a fragment of a Pinna clam. I have yet to find a whole Pinna clam. I’d kind of like to find at least one whole one someday. The only other formation I have found them is in the Goodland. It is another of the Washita Group formations.
  14. Phyllocarid Collection

    My phyllocarid collection to date. Includes Echinocaris sp. and Rhinocaris sp.
  15. Fossilized or no?

    I know that the first crab claw shown is fossilized the center has become stone and the edges where it was broken grey and black, but the second set of pictures I will post is of a claw that leaves me not so sure! It is hard as rock no doubt but the center is hollow and the edges more white which leads me to doubt. Opinions are welcome!
  16. What is this fossil?

    My son found this unique fossil in our creek bed. Anyone know what this is? Thanks for your help!
  17. Hello everyone, I'm from Belgium and currently tasked with securing a secondary fossil collection owned by the grandfather of my husband. We are emptying an attic, and securing quite a number of fossils. Many of them already have an ID, some of them however lack one. Apologies in advance for the poor quality of pictures, there is little to no light/electricity inside the rooms we need to vacate, so picture quality will be appalling at first. I am aiming for a basic ID here, if possible I might be able to provide more detailed pictures once the fossils have been properly packed and moved. #1 : Could this be a dinosaur egg? #2: vertebrae of different sizes + plate of petrified wood in the background. Looking for possible ID on these vertebrae. #3: Petrified wood, which type? #4 : Small crustacean? #5: Fossilized shell from morocco? #6: Partial fossilized jaw? #7: Belemnoidea, the two in the front? (they seem to be very large).
  18. I'll have the lobster thermidor ,please

    dietdinosHIecrustadietholdinosaurs-11538-w.pdf Outtake: Given authors & source publication: highly recommended
  19. Crustacean pincer

    I'm pretty dang sure this is a crustacean pincer. I'm wondering if I can get any other information about it. Also whether or not it is a rare find. I've hunted fossils in Austin since I was a kid but mostly just picking up the many many oysters, brachiopods, etc that are a dime a dozen around here, with the occasional "big find" (sea urchin, etc). I've never seen anything like this, but a little research at least shows that are known to occur. I found this in NW Austin, specifically in Great Hills park on the edge of a stream bed. The area is limestone. I'm finally getting around to actually learning the names of fossils/rocks/ets that I've seen my whole life. So I *think* this is Glen Rose limestone, but don't hold me to it! The limestone there is marly (new word for me!) and very clayey.
  20. Crab Pincer from the Pinna Layer

    From the album Just Above the Iridium Layer

    Branchiocarcinus flectus (crab pincer) Paleocene Hornerstown Formation Pinna Layer Manasquan River Basin Freehold, New Jersey prepared by Ralph Johnson
  21. Crustacean

    Found this little critter in a river bed in Grapevine Texas
  22. Crustaceans from the albian clay of Troyes

    From the album Elcoincoin collection : 1 - Albian of Troyes

    Case with crustaceans from the albian clay of Troyes
  23. Crabs from the albian clay of Troyes

    From the album Elcoincoin collection : 1 - Albian of Troyes

    Case with crabs from the albian clay of Troyes
  24. Crab claws

    Pair of undetermined crab claws from the early Eocene of France.
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