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Found 2 results

  1. I am really excited about a project we have been working on. We decided to switch our shark displays from the ones based on Geological era to a taxonomic display style. We had been considering this since we made a similar switch with our dinosaurs. It has made those programs flow more easily and i think allowed the kids to get a better understanding of the animals. We originally set our displays up as they were because we simply did not have enough material to do taxonomic displays. There were a few orders of sharks for which we had only one or two fossils and one extinct order for which we had zero fossils. Doing the displays along a timeline allowed us to cover up the holes in the collection. We have made a lot of improvements to our shark collection in the last year and were strongly considering changing things. A conversation with @siteseer really sealed the deal. Jess nudged me over the ledge lol So work has begun on this project and I am loving it but it is a lot of work. Each order of shark, extant and extinct, will eventually have it's own display. Within the the display, each family or in some cases genus, will be set up by temporal range. I think these displays will not only allow more efficient presentations but will also show temporal range and distribution as best we can. Step 1 was identifying which orders, families, and genera we need to add to the collection in order to round out what we already had. Some orders needed little attention but there were some that needed a bit of a boost. Heterodontiformes was an example of one that needed to a boost. We had Jurassic teeth (Paracestracion and Heterodontus) but little else. Having the Jurassic teeth is awesome because it shows how far back they go in the fossils record but that would be an underwhelming display visually and not give the kids a great sense of the sharks. We had to find fossils to place them at various points in their temporal range and widen their distribution to the best of our ability. Pristiophoriformes was another that we needed to upgrade as we only had one small rostal tooth. We had a good variety of material for most extinct orders but wanted a Carboniferous Xencanthid tooth to better tell the whole story of the Eel sharks as all of ours were Permian. We picked through micro fossils to add Devonian Ctenacanthiformes teeth to expand the temporal range and add diversity in the form of Phoebodus. Step 2 is on going and is probably the hardest part, acquiring the fossils we need. It is quite easy to find some of the things we needed. Others have been extremely difficult and a few are pretty much impossible. We are unlikely to knock Hemiscyllium or Oxynotus off the list. It proved very difficult, but not impossible, to locate a Cenozoic Chiloscyllium tooth. We had Cretaceous teeth but nothing beyond that and Bamboo Sharks are one that we do talk about quite a bit. After a lengthy search, we finally tracked one down and it was quite inexpensive. Cost is always a factor for us so early on we understood we were not going to be adding some collector type teeth like a 2" Chilean White Shark or the transitional White Shark teeth. We focused instead in smaller teeth and anything that added a new shark, contributed to showing distribution or temporal range. For us a STH Scyliorhinus is a significant fossils because it adds to both distribution and temporal range of a shark we talk about. I am very proud of some of the inexpensive teeth we have found including a Chilean Angelshark, a Miocene Mitsukurina, the Paleocene Chiloscyllium, and a Heterodontus fin spine from STH. We have also been greatly aided in our quest by a couple of donations, including one from @Troodon that included very important Eocene Orectolobiformes teeth and a super Megachasma from Chile. I want to credit @siteseer too though I am not sure what he is sending but I know it help tremendously lol Step 3 was figuring out how many display cases we would need and what sizes we would need. We knew that in addition to the displays by order, some sharks would get their own displays. For example, we have a lot of Lamniformes that we cover during our presentations but Goblin Sharks get special attention because kids really love them so they would get a separate display. The displays will not be of uniform size as some orders will be better represented. There will be more Carcharhiniformes than other orders for example. Size of the shark and size of the fossils also contribute to the need for a variation in display size. Step 4 is dismantling the old displays and putting together the new ones. This is on going and will not be finished until mid March probably. We need new labels which is taking a bit of time as there is a lot of shark fossils going into these displays. Step 5 will be displays of shark relatives. I think we will have one small one that will feature the three Stethacanthids we have, one small display for the two Eugenodontids and then another larger one to house the Batoids. We do cover shark relatives and they are quite popular with the students so these are important to the programs too. Kids love these wierdo creatues lol One of the really cool parts of this project is it allows me to think as an educator but also very much as a collector. I am an educator first and these fossils are for educational purposes but I consider myself a collector of shark fossils too. Doing this does allow me to add things that have educational value but also cross things off the personal list of sharks I want in the collection, like Megachasma and Mitsukurina. I can also view the collection and see areas where we can improve the quality of teeth at some point down the road. White Sharks and Cow sharks in particular will get an upgrade at some point. We can hunt for some of the rare Squaliformes teeth. Maybe we will track down a Ctenacanthus fin spine. Our goal is not just to tell the story of sharks but to show the story of sharks through the fossils. The people who invite us to present our fossils not only get to handle Megalodon teeth but they get close up examinations of a 300 million year old egg case, a Hybodus fin spine, shark vertebra and can compare the difference between Sawshark rostal teeth and Sawfish rostal teeth in their hands. I am quite proud of the hands-on education we give people and I think this project improves the overall impact. This project has also given us far more scientific knowledge and a far better understanding of shark classification. The learning has been invaluable really. Carter and I are both very passionate about sharks as we are with all of our programs but sharks have a special place. When he was a little guy, we would watch shark documentaries and this is an extension of that father son time for us. We knew this would require spending more money and take some time to do but we know it will be worth it. This will be a shark education program that will educate elementary students, museum patrons, college students and senior citizens. That is pretty darn cool I think. We also want to thank all of the forum members who contributed shark fossils and knowledge over the last year. This, like our other programs, would not be possible without the support, encouragement and generosity of TFF members. I apologize for the length of this post lol I have been really busy and have not been able to take the time to post about this and am pretty excited hence the rambling nature. I will post some pictures as we go through this and complete these. Pic 1 one of the boxes of shark fossils currently laying around our house lol It is a small box but there is quite a lot stored in there, just waiting for their permanent home.
  2. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since May 9, 2018. Class Chondrichthyes - The Cartilaginous Fishes Family incertae sedis Downs, J.P. and E.B. Daeschler (2001). Variation Within a Large Sample of Ageleodus pectinatus teeth (Chondrichthyes) from the Late Devonian of Pennsylvania, USA. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 21(4). Subclass Euchondrocephali Order indet. Family Lagarodontidae Cuny, G., J.B. Kristensen and L. Stemmerick (2016). First Record of Lagarodus (Chondrichthyes: Euchondrocephali) from the Carboniferous of Svalbard, Arctic Norway. Norwegian Journal of Geology, Vol.96, Number 1. Itano, W. (2012). Mining the Mines' Fossil Collections I: The Earliest-Collected Lagarodus from North America. Trilobite Tales, Lebedev, O.A. (2008). Systematics and dental system reconstruction of the durophagous chondrichtyan Lagarodus Jaekel, 1898. Acta Geologica Polonica, Vol.58, Number 2. Subclass Elasmobranchii Order incertae sedis Grogan, E.D. and R. Lund (2008). A Basal Elasmobranch, Thrinacoselache gracia N.Gen. & Sp., (Thrinacodontidae, New Family) from the Bear Gulch Limestone, Serpukhovian of Montana, USA. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 28(4). Martill, D.M., P.J.A. Del Strother and F. Gallien (2013). Acanthorhachis, a new genus of shark from the Carboniferous (Westphalian) of Yorkshire, England. Geol.Mag. Order Omalodontiformes Ivanov, A. and O. Rodina (2004). A new omalodontid-like shark from the Late Devonian (Famennian) of western Siberia, Russia. Fossils and Strata, Number 50. Maisey, J.G., R.F. Miller and S. Turner (2009). The braincase of the chondrichthyan Doliodus from the Lower Devonian Campbellton Formation of New Brunswick, Canada. Acta Zoologica (Stockholm), 90 (Suppl.1). Maisey, et al. (2017). Pectoral morphology in Doliodus: bridging the 'acanthodian'-chondrichthyan divide. American Museum Novitates, Number 3875. Maisey, et al. (2013). Dental Patterning in the Earliest Sharks: Implications for Tooth Evolution. Journal of Morphology, 00. Miller, R.F., R. Cloutier and S. Turner (2003). The oldest articulated chondrichthyan from the Early Devonian period. Nature (Letters). Turner, S. and R.F. Miller (2004). New Ideas About Old Sharks. American Scientist, Vol.93. Order Phoebodontiformes Duffin, C.J. (1993). A new record of the phoebodontid chondrichthyan Thrinacodus ferox (TURNER, 1982) from the Carboniferous of England. Belgian Geological Survey, Professional Paper, 264. Duncan, M. (2003). Early Carboniferous chondrichthyan Thrinacodus from Ireland, and a reconstruction of jaw apparatus. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 48(1). Ginter, M. and S. Turner (1999). The early Famennian recovery of phoebodont sharks. Acta Geologica Polonica, Vol.49, Number 2. Ginter, M. and A. Ivanov (1992). Devonian phoebodont shark teeth. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 37(1). Hampe, O. (2000). Occurrence of Phoebodus gothicus (Chondrichthyes: Elasmobranchii) in the middle Famennian of northwestern Iran (Province East Azerbaijan). Acta Geologica Polonica, Vol.20, Number 3. Turner, S. and R.F. Miller (2008). Protodus jexi Woodward, 1892 (Chondrichthyes), from the Lower Devonian Campbellton Formation, New Brunswick, Canada. Acta Geologica Polonica, Vol.58, Number 2. Order Protacrodontiformes Leu, M.R. (1989). A Late Permian Freshwater Shark from Eastern Australia. Palaeontology, Vol.32, Part 2. Li,G.-Q. (1988). A New Species of Protacrodus from North Jiangsu. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 26(2). Order Squatiniformes - Angel Sharks Cabrera, D.A., A.L. Cione and M.A. Cozzuol (2012). Tridimensional Angel Shark Jaw Elements (Elasmobranchii, Squatinidae) from the Miocene of Southern Argentina. Ameghiniana, 49(1). Claeson, K.M. and A. Hilger (2011). Morphology of the anterior vertebral region in elasmobranchs: special focus, Squatiniformes. Fossil Record, 14(2). de Carvalho, M.R., J. Kriwet and D. Thies (2008). A systematic and anatomical revision of Late Jurassic angelsharks (Chondrichthyes: Squatinidae). In: Mesozoic Fishes 4 = Homology and Phylogeny. Arratia, G., H.-P. Schultze and M.V.H. Wilson (eds.), Verlag Dr. Friedrich Pfeil, Munich. Guinot, G., et al. (2012). Squatiniformes (Chondrichthyes, Neoselachii) from the Late Cretaceous of Southern England and Northern France With Redescription of the Holotype of Squatina cranei Woodward, 1888. Palaeontology, Vol.55, Part 3. Klug, S. and J. Kriwet (2013). Node age estimations and the origin of angel sharks, Squatiniformes (Neoselachii, Squalomorphii). Journal of Systematic Paleontology, Vol.11, Issue 1. Mollen, F.H., B.W.M. van Bakel and J.W.M. Jagt (2016). A partial braincase and other skeletal remains of Oligocene angel sharks (Chondrichthyes, Squatiniformes) from northwest Belgium, with comments on squatinoid taxonomy. Contributions to Zoology, 85(2). Perez, V.J. and K.W. Marks (2017). The First Documented Fossil Records of Isistius and Squatina (Chondrichthyes) from Florida, With an Overview of the Associated Vertebrate Fauna. Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History, 55(7). Order Symmoriiformes Case, G.R. (1970). The Occurrence of Petrodus and Other Fossil Shark Remains in the Pennsylvanian of Iowa. The Annals of Iowa, Vol.40, Number 6. Coates, M.I. and S.E.K. Sequeira (2001). A New Stethacanthid Chondrichthyan from the Lower Carboniferous of Bearsden, Scotland. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 21(3).c Lund, R. (1986). On Damocles serratus, Nov.Gen. et Sp. (Elasmobranchii: Cladodontida) from the Upper Mississippian Bear Gulch Limestone of Montana. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 6(1). Lund, R. (1985). The Morphology of Falcatus falcatus (St. John and Worthen), A Mississippian Stenacanthid Chondrichtyan from the Bear Gulch Limestone of Montana. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 5(1). Lund, R. (1985). Stethacanthid Elasmobranch Remains from the Bear Gulch Limestone (Namurian E2b) of Montana. American Museum Novitates, Number 2828. Maisey, J.G. (2008). Some observations on Denaea fournieri (Chondrichthyes, Symmoriformes) from the Lower Carboniferous of Belgium. Acta Geologica Polonica, Vol.58, Number 2. Maisey, J.G. (2006). The Braincase in Paleozoic Symmoriform and Cladoselachian Sharks. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Number 307. (22.6MB) Pradel, A., et al. (2011). A New Paleozoic Symmoriiformes (Chondrichthyes) from the Late Carboniferous of Kansas (USA) and Cladistic Analysis of Early Chondrichthyans. PLoS ONE, 6(9). Infraclass Cladoselachimorpha Order Cladoselachiformes Jacquemin, S.J., et al. (2016). Quantifying Heterodonty in the Late Devonian (Upper Famennian) Sharks Cladoselache and Ctenacanthus from the Ohio Shale, USA. PalArch's Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 13, 1. Maisey, J.G. (2006). The Braincase in Paleozoic Symmoriform and Cladoselachian Sharks. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Number 307. (22.6MB) Infraclass Xenacanthimorpha Order Bransonelliformes Elliott, D.K. and J.-P.M. Hodnett (2013). A New Species of Bransonella (Chondrichthyes, Xenacanthamorpha, Bransonelliformes) from the Middle Permian Kaibab Formation of Northern Arizona. Journal of Paleontology, 87(6). Hampe, O. and A. Ivanov (2007). Bransonelliformes - a new order of the Xenacanthimorpha (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii). Fossil Record, 10(2). Order Xenacanthiformes Beck, K.G., et al. (2016). Morphology and histology of dorsal spines of the xenacanthid shark Orthacanthus platypternus from the Lower Permian of Texas, USA: Palaeobiological and palaeoenvironmental implications. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 61(1). Dick, J.R.F. (1998). Sphenacanthus, a Palaeozoic freshwater shark. In: A study of fossil vertebrates. Norman, D.B., A.R. Milner and A.C. Milner (eds.), Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 122. Hampe, O., G.D. Johnson and S. Turner (2006). Dicentrodus (Chondrichthyes: Xenacanthida) from the Early Carboniferous (Visean: upper St. Louis Formation) of Iowa, USA. Geol.Mag., 143(4). Richter, M. (2005). A New Xenacanthid Shark (Chondrichthyes) from the Teresina Formation, Permian of the Parana Basin, Southern Brazil. Revista Brasileira de Paleontologia, 8(2). Turner, S. and C.J. Burrow (2011). A Lower Carboniferous Xenacanthiform Shark from Australia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 31(2). General Xenacanthiformes Ivanov, A. and M. Ginter (1996). Early Carboniferous xenacanthids (chondrichthyes) from eastern Europe. Bull.Soc.geol. France, Vol.167, Number 5. Johnson, G.D. (2005). Underdeveloped and Unusual Xenacanth Shark Teeth from the Lower Permian of Texas. Proceedings of the South Dakota Academy of Science, Vol.84. Johnson, G.D. and D.W. Thayer (2009). Early Pennsylvanian xenacanth chondrichthyans from the Swisshelm Mountains, Arizona, USA. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 54(4). Schaeffer, B. (1981). The Xenacanth Shark Neurocranium, with Comments on Elasmobranch Monophyly. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Vol.169, Article 1. Turner, S. (1997). "Dittodus" Species of Eastman 1899 and Hussakof and Bryant 1918 (Mid to Late Devonian). Modern Geology, Vol.21. Infraclass Euselachii (Sharks and Rays) Order Ctenacanthiformes Duffin, C. and M. Ginter (2006). Comments on the Selachian Genus Cladodus Agassiz, 1843. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 26(2). Fahrenbach, M.D. (1990). Cladodont Shark Teeth from the Late Devonian--Early Mississippian Englewood Formation of the Black Hills, South Dakota. Proc.S.D.Acad.Sci., Vol.69. Ginter, M. (2009). The dentition of Goodrichthys, a Carboniferous ctenacanthiform shark from Scotland. Acta Zoologica (Stockholm), 90 (Suppl.1) Ginter, M. (2002). Taxonomic notes on "Phoebodus heslerorum" and Symmorium reniforme (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii). Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 47(3). Ginter, M. and J.G. Maisey (2007). The Braincase and Jaws of Cladodus from the Lower Carboniferous of Scotland. Palaeontology, Vol.50, Part 2. Ginter, M., et al. (2005). A revision of "Cladodus" occidentalis, a late Palaeozoic ctenacanthiform shark. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 50(3). Hodnett, J.P.-M,, et al. (2012). Ctenacanthiform sharks from the Permian Kaibab Formation, northern Arizona. Historical Biology, Vol.24, Number 4. (thanks to Oxytropidoceras for finding this one) Itano, W.M., K.J. Houck and M.G. Lockley (2003). Ctenacanthus and Other Chondrichthyan Spines and Denticles from the Minturn Formation (Pennsylvanian) of Colorado. J.Paleont., 77(3). Jacquemin, S.J., et al. (2016). Quantifying Heterodonty in the Late Devonian (Upper Famennian) Sharks Cladoselache and Ctenacanthus from the Ohio Shale, USA. PalArch's Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 13, 1. Johnson, G.D. (2008). Ctenacanthiform Cladodont Teeth from the Lower Permian Wichita Group, Texas, U.S.A.. Acta Geologica Polonica, Vol.58, Number 2. Johnson, M.E. (1974). Occurrence of a Ctenacanthoid Shark Spine from the Upper Devonian of North Central Iowa. Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science, Vol.81, Article 6. Maisey, J.G. (2005). Braincase of the Upper Devonian Shark Cladodoides wildungensis (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii), With Observations on the Braincase in Early Chondrichthyans. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Number 288. (103 pages) Maisey, J.G. (1984). 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