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Found 17 results

  1. Yesterday (Saturday, Aug. 22nd), I went fossil hunting in Ellsworth County, Kansas again for elusive Dakota Sandstone leaves and unfortunately it's mostly a bust, just like the previous trip. Despite that, I enjoyed the scenery and found some odd rocks and few fossils from new sites. A new site produced a few small plates containing woody and plant material fragments. I decided not to keep them. Closer views... Remember that interesting sandstone from the previous trip? I regretted for not taking it home so I took another opportunity and revisited the old site to get that rock! The back of this rock is quite smooth and flat, I think it would be great to have it hang up on the wall, but I'm actually not sure how I will display it. Looking at it is like reading a 3D map! It's the only object I brought home from this trip. It's peaceful out there and the views of the Smoky Hills never gets old. ...continued on the next post.
  2. Liesegang rings?

    At first I thought it might be the cross-section of petrified trunk but upon a closer inspection, I doubt it's petrified woods. It is not silicified. I wonder if it's a concretion or Liesegang rings? I don't think I have seen something like this in person before. I couldn't get it extracted because it's embedded in the bedrock.
  3. Burrow?

    I'm wondering if it's a fossilized burrow or some form of ichnofossil. Notice the depression from the opposite side of the burrow-like projection. Dakota Sandstone formation and Cenomanian in age.
  4. Petrified woods?

    I'm wondering if it's really the petrified woods. It's found in ironstone concretions from Dakota Sandstone (Cenomanian), and it strikes me as 'woody'. I'm interested in what others think. From different trip and different site few months ago, but same formation and age.
  5. Finding the fossilized leaves from Dakota formation (also known as Dakota Sandstone) has been one of my goals for a long time. Today I headed to Ellsworth County, Kansas, where the Dakota Sandstone are located and hunt for the fossilized leaves. Unfortunately it's mostly a bust, but I did find a couple possible wood fossils and a few interesting rocks. I didn't take anything home this time except some pictures and memories. Notice the trees following along the small stream. Interesting sandstone! Interesting ironstone concretion! ...Continued on the next post.
  6. Concretionary?

    From my previous trip to Ellsworth County, Kansas and it's located in Dakota formation, Cenomanian. It appeared as almost like vertebrae but I'm sure it's not verts. Is it by chance some form of ichnofossil? @jpc thinks it's concretionary. No disrespect to him, he's the only one who offered his opinion and I would like to know if anyone else have a different opinion.
  7. Tree limb? Bamboo? Reed?

    Like what title said: is it a tree limb, bamboo, reed, or is it even something geological? Dakota formation, also known as Dakota Sandstone. Dakota formation is known to produce variety of flora fossils, such as leaves and seeds. The patterns on these fossils strike me as 'flora-ish'; like these that seem be nodes and also 'bark-like' and fibrous textures. ...Continued on the next post.
  8. Today I had a good time with fossil hunting at the Dakota formation (early Cenomanian) sites and Greenhorn formation (Cenomanian-early Turonian) sites in Ellsworth county, Kansas. Typical view of the local countryside, but still beautiful! I keep finding these weird vertebrae-like rocks, clustered in this particular site and not other sites. I suspect it's not vertebrae but I still can't figure this out yet. These mysterious vertebrae-like rocks...reminds me of shark centrum and crinoid stems but I don't think it's them. This site is Dakota formation. I took these home just in case it is identified as fossils later. I think it's fossil vegetation of some sort. Maybe reed or horsetail? I found these jumbled at different locations but put it together and it fitted like a puzzle. I took it home and will be prepped. This is from Dakota formation. Inoceramus from Greenhorn formation. One of the best specimen of this genus I have found so far! Took this one home. Another Inoceramus, pretty good specimen! I also took this one home. Tiny fossil in the center. Greenhorn formation again. This tiny fossil, image enlarged and the ridges/grooves are visible. No idea what it was. I took this one home and will be put under the microscope for identification efforts. The storm was brewing at the distance as the cold front is heading south. It was lightning and I was at near the top of hill, the road would be impassable if wet, so it was time for me to go home! I will be posting some of those fossils on the Fossils ID section soon after it is cleaned up. Cheers!
  9. Ironstone fossil?

    Is this even a fossil? Ichnofossil? I'm stumped by this weird pattern. I found this ironstone in my parents' gravel driveway. Gravels were recently obtained from the local sand pit company here in Salina, KS., so I'm pretty sure this stone was transported in the river from Kiowa or Dakota formation (Albian) before being deposited.
  10. 'Spikeball'

    I'm guessing it's an iron concretion and not a fossil, but I would like to make sure. I have never seen anything like this shaped like a spikeball or flower, except in crystals. Fossil or not, I took it home because it's so interesting! Dakota formation and early Cenomainian. This formation are known for fossilized plants, leaf imprints, and petrified woods. Top view: Bottom view:
  11. Betulites sp.

    From the album Plants

    Betulites sp. Upper Cretaceous Cenomanian Dakota Formation Ellsworth Kansas USA Length 6cm / 2 inch
  12. In near-complete fossil form, only known Kansas dinosaur reappears after 100 million years. The Nodosaur Silvisaurus condrayi. Only part of the dinosaur ever was placed on exhibit at the museum, and that display was removed several years ago that changed this Spring. Interesting story to this cool dinosaur .....article starts as follows "In May of 1955, a Kansas rancher on horseback was checking on cows and calves near a dry “pasture ditch” that ran through his land in Ottawa County. In a gully, he spotted something strange — fragments of unusual bone embedded in a rock." ... http://news.ku.edu/2018/04/25/near-complete-fossil-form-only-known-kansas-dinosaur-reappears-after-100-million-years Silvisaurus condrayi The original paper, 1960 https://kuscholarworks.ku.edu/handle/1808/3799
  13. Kummelonautilus?

    While on an adventure with @Pilobolus, exploring the Dakota Sandstone and underlying shales, I found something very exciting*... ...my first coiled Nautiloid! Coiled Nautiloid Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Paguate Member of the Dakota Formation Sandoval County, New Mexico Now, after a bit of research, I write here to lean on this Forum for assistance with identification. I find that this specimen sits well in the genus Kummelonautilus...what say you? Many thanks for your help, -P. *Bryan can attest to my yelling and jumping around. @FossilDAWG
  14. conularid?

    Hi all, I found this what I believe to be a conularid between Brownville and Peru Nebraska in what I believe is part of the Dakota Formation (nearshore Cretaceous) however to my knowledge no Conulariida have been described in Nebraska Cretaceous material. There are also outcrops of Permian limestone (part of the Stanton formation) present where I found this, but this is the wrong type of rock for that. I’ve never found a conularid before, so confirmation of that would be helpful! (Also ruler is in inches)
  15. HI all, One of the most unusual preservations of fossils in the Dakota / Mancos shale here in Arizona is by infilling of the molds in the shales by an iron mineral called siderite. It is black, shiny and sub metallic and has a heavy feel. Finding a big razor clam preserved this way for example has always been exciting - the heft and appearance are breathtaking. However, we have never found brachs in either shales or sandstones. Mostly huge molluscs such as oysters, ammonites, and gastropods. So when we started pulling out super tiny complete brachs out of the sides of the anthills recently, it was a super find! They are so small, the size of a pinhead to thumbtack, and are smooth and very generic looking. Its going to be very hard to nail down the identification on these because of this, but I thought Id post what we have so far. Out of a gallon of anthill gravels, we found roughly a teaspoon of these brachs. (Tablespoons of shark teeth!) So here is what we have so far, at 10x through the microscope:
  16. Hi all, As we continue to wash, sieve and go through one teaspoon at a time our gravels from the sides of giant ant hill mounds from the Twowells Tongue of the Dakota, we are finding some very exciting microfossils! As you recall, we found ourselves on the top of a large rounded hilltop a few months back with very rare limestone on its cap. Most sediment from this formation is either a yellow sandstone, or shale. The Ants did all the work - They brought up pieces of material from the depths of the usual stuff, mostly small gravel pieces and sand. But mixed in has been a plethora of microfossils. Besides the tons of giant forams I posted last time, we have hordes of shark and fish teeth. Can you imagine a red fire ant about 1/4" long carrying a perfect fossilized shark tooth out of its burrow? (yes they bite!) Here are some representative of what some us were calling "Ray or Skate teeth". IVe put them under the microscope at 10x and did a dark field illumination. Most are top up and a few bottom up so you can see both sides. They are roughly 2-3mm in size and are a bit oblong. Most are flat topped domed, but many are more pointy and spherical in shape. My thoughts are some sort of pavement crushing shark which ate molluscs? What do you think, I don't have much experience with fish teeth, but we are sure finding some beauties!
  17. Hi all, We do qute a bit of microfossil study of what is usually specimens dissolved out of a limestone matrix. But these were obtained in a most unusual way. There are areas in north eastern Arizona near Show Low that are in the Twowells tongue of the Dakota formation. On one of our recent expeditions, we found a low hill composed not of the usual sandstone and shales, but of limestone. We found on top scored of giant ant hills several feet in diameter. The ants had dug down deep in to the earth and pulled out not only the usual gravels, but quite a few fossils too! We spent hours going over the abandoned ant hills with magnifier and tweezers and even took home bags of the scrapings from the sides for later examination. We found tons of tiny complete sharks teeth, ray/skate teeth, fish bone, black sideritized gastropods and brachs, and some really interesting forams. Tons of them. They look like chains of spheres, and internally they are rolled up like dough in crescent roll. Here is an image with close up camera and a mm scale. I know nothing about forams. Can any one tell me anything at all about these interesting finds?
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