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Found 20 results

  1. T. rex ancestor?

    I read an article a while back that compared what the writer considered to be the most likely ancestors to T.rex. According to the article, Daspletosaurus is the most likely ancestor to T.rex. The article had some pretty interesting points about anagenisis, and how D. torosus probably evolved into D. horneri, and that the entire lineage ended with T.rex. One of the more interesting things I read was that a lacrimal bone was found in the Judith River Formation, and it was thought to be from T.rex. The article said that Daspletosaurus had eye sockets more similar to T.rex than Albertosaurus or Gorgosaurus, and because of this was likely an ancestor. This sounded reasonable to me, but I understand you can’t trust everything you read online, and I wasn’t sure what the current scientific consensus was on the ancestor to T.rex. This is the link to the article https://magazine.scienceconnected.org/2017/03/dinosaur-gave-rise-tyrannosaurus-rex/
  2. My Collection

    New to collecting and this site, thought I’d debut my small collection in my first post. Any comments or tips would be appreciated.
  3. Tyrannosaurid Indet Confirmation

    Hello all, Recently acquired 2 teeth, found and sold together, that I would love some insight and second opinions on. Both teeth are described as Tyrannosaurid Indet, from the Judith River Formation. The seller described that he purchased them both together from the harvester, but due to the fact he was not the original collector, the information is isolated to the above information. Smaller tooth is 15/16" long, dark chocolate color, and 1/4" wide. Serrations are present on front and rear edges, with serrations starting midway on the front edge. Larger tooth is missing the front edge, appears sheared. Length is 1 1/8", width 5/16". Serrations present cleanly on rear edge, but again completely sheared from front edge. Color also deeper chocolate brown, but more horizontal banding. Can obtain more detailed and specific measurements of other needed dimensions if needed. Mainly I'm looking for a confirmation of Tyrannosaurid Indet distinguished from other theropods in the area at the time, as I have little experience positively IDing smaller tyrannosaurid material. I've actively worked on distinguishing Carcharodontosaur teeth from Rugops in the field in Morocco, but this is out of my field. All help is greatly appreciated! Will post more pictures in comments
  4. Hi everybody, I've seen this daspletosaurus tooth, what do you think about that. Is It classificable like Daspletosaurus or indet. theropod tooth? The Sellers says that cane from Hells Creek formation Larfield 60x15mm Thanks
  5. Daspletosaurus tooth?

    Hello everybody So this tooth here is up for sale. Described as a Daspletosaurus tooth from the Judith River Formation. (Not more information) Length: 5,3 cm or around 2 inches. There seems to be some crack repair on the tip but other then that it looks good to me. What I wondering is, if it's possible to describe this as a Daspletosaurus tooth? Or are there just to few information for a proper identification? Any help on what I am looking at is very welcome. Thank you!
  6. On Sunday I took a trip to the Natural History Museum in London. I queued up before it opened at 10am and even before then there was a long queue. I have not visited this museum since I was a child and spent an entire day there (10am to 4.30pm - a long time). I was surprised as it is a lot bigger than I remembered and there was so much to see. This place has the most wonderful things and is an incredible place to learn. The museum showcases a Baryonyx, Sophie the Stegosaurus (the world's most complete Stegosaurus) and more! The moving Trex and Deinonychus are also really realistic in the way they move. If you like your dinosaur teeth, the Megalosaurus and Daspletosaurus teeth are out of this world! There is something for everyone in this museum and I would highly recommend that you visit here if you have not already! A lot of the dinosaur specimens are casts taken from other museums but they are still cool to look at. I had taken the photos on my SLR and due to the size of the photos I had to reduce the quality of them to be able to post on the forum which is unfortunate but it's the only way otherwise the photos would take a really long time to load. There are more non-dinosaur related photos that I will be posting at some point later on but may take me some time to pick out. Enjoy the photos from this section of the museum! Blue Zone Dinosaurs (has a mix of some photos of crocs too)
  7. Seller has listed these teeth as Daspletosaurus from the Judith River Fm, Hill County Montana Can you determine if this is a correct ID for these teeth. Thanks .
  8. Daspletosaurus Tooth?

    Hi there, I am thinking of buying a Daspletosaurus Tooth and saw this listing on Ebay (pictures below). Please can you tell me if this is a legitimate tooth from Daspletosaurus? Or if anyone has a similar quality tooth that they are willing to sell, please let me know! Thanks
  9. I saw this on a number of different posts by the Tyrrell and thought it would interest our members. Clips and photos courtesy of RTMP. The Royal Tyrrell Museum collection includes one of the best-preserved Daspletosaurus theropod skulls. The skull is unique in that it is a disarticulated skull, where all the bones were found separately and were not crushed flat during fossilization. Daspletosaurus was a large tyrannosaur that lived 77.3 – 75 million years ago in Alberta and is closely related to Tyrannosaurus rex. The left maxilla (upper jaw). Note the teeth at various stages of growth. Dinosaurs continually replaced their teeth throughout their lives why the different sizes in the jaw The skull bones of the Daspletosaurus torosus were first discovered in 2000 near the Milk River in southern Alberta, and it took until 2011 for all the pieces to be collected. Since the individual pieces of the skull were separated, it was not obvious where each bone was located in the quarry. Researchers waited until further pieces of the skull eroded out of the ground, rather than searching for them. The left pre-maxilla (front of the upper jaw) in the field. Left pre-maxilla (front of the upper jaw) prepared. As fossil bones are extremely fragile and often heavy, they can be difficult to manipulate and handle. That makes it difficult for researchers to study certain specimens, or for them to be displayed. Although they have the majority of the skull of Daspletosaurus torosus in our collection, it is too fragile to piece back together. As a solution, they decided to create a cast and display it as an exploded skull. Exploded skulls are a common tool used to teach anatomy, allowing for examination of the individual pieces of a skull. This will allow researchers to examine all the bones that make up a theropod skull from multiple angles. Since certain pieces of this skull of Daspletosaurus torosus are too delicate to be cast using traditional methods, they created a digital model of the skull using photogrammetry. By taking multiple photos of each piece, their technicians were able to create digital models of the skull that were then 3D printed. This project is the first time the Museum has 3D printed a cast of a specimen and it was very successful. To show all 41 bones of the skull of Daspletosaurus torosus, they mounted the cast as an exploding skull. They suspended the specimen in the air to determine the position of the pieces. Once the positions were finalized, a mount was constructed to hold the specimen A mount is then created. Daspletosaurus torosus is now on display! This display was one of their most difficult and technical projects yet, using new technologies and artistic techniques to create the cast and mount. As far as they know, it is the only exploded dinosaur skull in the world Photo of player Found that the player moves quite fast. Move the forward > with your finger for better results DWLAqm2XcAEohbq.mp4
  10. Here's my Two Medicine formation collection from Montana. It's all Daspletosaurus besides one Saurornitholestes tooth. I'm hoping to get specimens of some of the Two Medicine herbivores in the future. Pics 2 and 3= Daspletosaurus tooth in matrix Pics 4 and 5= Daspletosaurus partial tibia Pics 6 and 7= Daspletosaurus toe bone partial Pics 8 and 9= Daspletosaurus vertebrae process Pics 10 and 11=Saurornitholestes tooth
  11. Tyrannosaurid Tooth?

    Hi folks! Thought I might try leaning on the expertise of the forum gurus - I've owned this tooth for a few years and would like to hear any opinions of what the specimen should be classed as. It was sold as Daspletosaurus Torosus, but I'm aware of how hard it can be to label Tyrannosaur teeth (or just leave them as 'indet'). The tooth originated from Alberta, Canada. As it isn't the clearest to see, the denticles (which are very fine and equal in size on both sides) on the anterior edge curve off to the right (viewing the tooth face on), whilst the posterior serrated line is straight. PS: Apologies for the quality of photos too...my phone doesn't enjoy photographing anything magnified.
  12. The Twitter Paleontology World post cool images of fossils on Friday so I'm happy to steal from them and share some dinosaur ones with this forum Holotype specimen of the short-faced dromaeosaur Atrociraptor from the Horseshoe Canyon Fm of Alberta - ROM Oviraptorid Skull, Mongolia, Rinchenia mongoliensis AMNH Protoceratops andrewsi 3 Year old Tarbosaurus, Mongolia Skeleton of Baryonyx Amargasaurus, from Museo Paleontológico Egidio Feruglio, Patagonia, Argentina is a Sauropod. Diabloceratops holotype skull natural history museum of Utah Daspletosaurus maxilla -Tyrrell
  13. Wear facets, spalling and split carinae are typical features you see on Tyrannosaurid teeth that add character and mystery to these teeth. Here are two papers that examine these features. Wear Facets Lambe (1917) noted wear surfaces on the side faces of tyrannosaurid lateral teeth from the Red Deer River deposits of western Canada. He wrote “as the upper teeth closed outside those of the mandible any wear, not on the point, would result from the contact of the inner surface of the upper teeth with the outer surface of the lower ones.” Recent work, has, however, challenged this assertion, suggesting that the shapes, locations, and incidences of tyrannosaurid wear surfaces are not indicative of tooth−tooth contact (Farlow and Brinkman 1994; Molnar 1998; Jacobsen 1996, 2003). Here the paper reevaluates this evidence by examining wearstriations in tyrannosaurid lateral teeth in addition to the shapes and locations of their wear surfaces. Wear facets and enamel spalling in tyrannosaurid dinosaurs Blaine W. Schubert and Peter S. Ungar Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 50 (1), 2005: 93-99 app50-093.pdf Split Carina 11% of the teeth studied in the paper exhibited this trait. Trauma, aberrant tooth replacement, or genetic factors may have led to the development of split carinae. The paper concluded that although not conclusive genetic factors get the most support but additional study is needed. Other factors like nutrition may play a part but the paper points out is not testable. Pay walled Split Carinae on Tyrannosaurid Teeth and Implications of Their Development Gregory M. Erickson Pages 268-274 | Received 14 Jun 1993, Accepted 17 Jan 1994, Published online: 24 Aug 2 https://doi.org/10.1080/02724634.1995.10011229 From my collection
  14. Judith River Tyrannosaur

    From the album Dinosaurs and Reptiles

    30 mm nicely preserved tyrannosaur tooth. As I understand, it is impossible to distinguish between Gorgosaurus, Daspletosaurus and Albertosaurus from Judith River Fm.
  15. I find it interesting when I see Tyrannosaurid material for sale, from the Judith River of Montana, that so little is understood of what actually is being offered. Most sellers call their specimen either Daspletosaurus or Albertosaurus and a few, when it comes to teeth, properly identify them as Tyrannosaurid indet. Very few will label anything Gorgosaurus unless it's really small. Yet none of these Tyrannosaurids have been described from this fauna and Albertosaurus may not even be represented. So what is currently known with the major Tyrannosaurids. I've tried to look around and gather what information is available and put it together in its simplest form so it's understood, if there are missteps let me know. Sorry, it's from my narrow collector perspective Let me prefix this by saying this is an area that is constantly evolving based with new discoveries and research. Papers just a few years old can already be obsolete and views are changing. The other issue is that since so little material has been discovered in some strata that there may not be consensus among paleontologist but thats not new and we also know that their ego's run high. Not here to debate anything. Tyrannosaurids Described by age/strata: Late Maastrichtian deposits 69 - 66 mya (Lance/HellCreek/Scollard Formations et al. ) Tyrannosaurus rex Nanotyrannus lancensis Very Late Campanian / Mid Maastrichtian deposits 73 -67 mya (Horseshoe Canyon Formation) Albertosaurus sarcophagus Late Campanian deposits 75.1 - 74.4 mya (Two Medicine Formation) Daspletosaurus horneri (just described) (this is described just at the very end of the TM FM not all, age of deposit where collected is very important) Mid Campanian deposits 76.6 - 75.1mya (Two Medicine Formation) Gorgosaurus sp. does exist not nammed Mid Campanian deposits 76.7 - 75.2 mya (Belly River Group) Daspletosaurus torosus Mid Campanian deposits 76.7 - 75.1 mya (Dinosaur Park Formation) Gorgosaurus libratus What is important to note is that no Tyrannosaurid's have been described from the Judith River Formation (80-75 mya) of Montana. Since the stratigraphy is similiar to that of eastern Alberta it's fair to assume the Tyrannosaurids like Daspletosaurus and Gorgosaurus would be present but not Albertosaurus which is younger in age. A note from an article I read stated that Albertosaurus and Daspletosaurus are stratigraphically separate, with the former from the late Campanian to Maastrichtian Horseshoe Canyon Formation, and the latter coming from the middle Campanian Belly River Group. Additional discoveries and research will determine if this holds up. So as a collector you need to take a look at what you have labeled and some may need to be updated and keep this in mind with your next acquisition. Remember when trying to acquire tyrannosaurid material don't get hung up on the name, focus on the bone or tooth since it will be with you forever while names can change. Chart clearly showing the distribution by age (the Two Medicine Taxon is now D. horneri) Tyrant Dinosaur Evolution Tracks the Rise and Fall of Late Cretaceous Oceans Mark A. Loewen1*, Randall B. Irmis1, Joseph J. W. Sertich2, Philip J. Currie3, Scott D. Sampson1 PDF: journal.pone.0079420.PDF Carr's Blog (Chart) http://tyrannosauroideacentral.blogspot.com/2017/04/introducing-daspletosaurus-horneri-two.html?m=0 This is an FYI: Appalachiosaurus montgomeriensis no longer considered a Tyrannosaurid but a basal Tyrannosauroid if that's really important or relevant to collectors. (PDF from above)
  16. Daspletosaurus horneri Ontogeny

    Howdy folks! I found the following article on Dr. Thomas Carr's twitter feed this afternoon. It gives a little more insight into the growth stages of the newly described Daspletosaurus. Why do I follow a bunch of paleontologists on twitter? Well, because dentistry is sometimes boring, but paleontology never is! Enjoy! On on a side note, he is working on the "Jane" monograph, so stay tuned! http://tyrannosauroideacentral.blogspot.com/2017/04/introducing-daspletosaurus-horneri-two_3.html?m=1
  17. A new Tyrannosaurid has been described from the Medicine Formation. Daspletosaurus horneri For collectors of dinosaur teeth, there is nothing in the paper that I've yet seen that would distinguish these teeth from other Tyrannosaurid in the Two Medicine Article: http://www.nature.com/articles/srep44942 Paper: srep44942.pdf
  18. I bought this nice theropod tooth online and the seller told me that it was a Daspletosaurus from the Judith River Formation, Montana. While looking online for more info, I found a few people saying that some dealers lie about the genus of tyrannosaurid teeth (especially with Daspletosaurus) as they are hard to identify. Just wondering if anyone here can I.D. this tooth? Suggestions are much appreciated!
  19. Tyrannosaurs Teeth Collection

    From the album Dinosaur Fossils collection

    Collection of North American Tyrannosaur teeth: T-Rex, Daspletosaurus, Gorgosaurus, Nanotyrannus, Albertosaurus and Aublysodon
  20. Tyrannosaurs teeth Collection

    From the album Dinosaur Fossils collection

    Assortment of North American Tyrannosaur teeth - T-Rex, Nanotyranus, Albertosaurus & Daspletosaurus
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