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Found 21 results

  1. get your teeth into this,part two

    ray Dental sexual dimorphism and morphology of Urotrygon microphthalmum Bianca de Sousa Rangel Zoomorphology,april 2016 RECOMMENDED
  2. get your teeth into this

    Development and Evolution of Dentition Pattern and Tooth Order in the Skates And Rays (Batoidea; Chondrichthyes) Charlie J. Underwood,*, Zerina Johanson,, Monique Welten,, Brian Metscher,Liam J. Rasch,, Gareth J. Fraser,, Moya Meredith Smith Citation: Underwood CJ, Johanson Z, Welten M, Metscher B, Rasch LJ, Fraser GJ, et al. (2015) Development and Evolution of Dentition Pattern and Tooth Order in the Skates And Rays (Batoidea; Chondrichthyes). PLoS ONE 10(4): e0122553. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0122553 given the collective NOUS and expertise of the authors:DO NOT MISS THIS ONE!!!
  3. Mystery Fossil From Rock Show

    Quite some years back my late uncle purchased the attached fossil at a gem show here locally. Too be completely honest it looks kind of fake to me... but im might just have a untrained eye. My Aunt has taken the picture. I Couldn't possibly imagine it being from around here so I'm really not sure what age it could be or what location it is from. I'll try to acquire some more photos with a scale shortly. I know its a shot in the dark but any feedback would be greatly appreciated. -Nick
  4. Hi guys! I just uploaded a gallery of modern Carcharhinus upper dentitions: . The images are from my master's thesis (Smith 2015), the full text is available at (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/316735477_Species_discrimination_in_Carcharhinus_shark_teeth_using_elliptic_Fourier_analysis). Unfortunately, due to file size limitations, the images in the paper are not really good enough for detailed analysis of the morphology. So I have uploaded them individually here. I personally extracted the teeth from almost all of these jaws...If I remember correctly, they were soaked in isopropyl alcohol for several days and then the teeth removed with toothpicks and/or just pulling them out with my fingers. I cut up my fingers too many times to count trying to get these suckers out! Only the upper dentition is included; the bottom teeth in Carcharhinus are very same-y so we just focused on the uppers. Keep in mind, these represent only twelve species out of over thirty described species. They are biased towards species today present in the Western Atlantic/Gulf of Mexico. Five species now present in the Western Atlantic/Gulf of Mexico were not included due to lack of specimens/time: C. altimus, C. galapagensis, C. perezi, C. porosus, and C. signatus. Other Carcharhinus dentitions are available on the net. J-elasmo has some, I believe mostly collected from near Japan: http://naka.na.coocan.jp/JAWCarcharhinidae.html. They generally match well with my dentitions, although their Silky (C. falciformis) dentition is more coarsely serrated at the tips than mine, and the lateral notch, which is prominent in my specimens, is basically absent in the J-elasmo dentition. And of course there is Elasmo.com, a great resource for all sharks, not just Carcharhinus. Their C. falciformis dentition is similar to mine, so I don't know what's going on with J-elasmo's dentition, either it's mislabeled or Silky teeth look a lot different in the western Pacific. Or it's just an unusual specimen. And of course there are a bunch of papers online with Carcharhinus teeth, although these are generally isolated fossil teeth. The single best resource I could find for Carcharhinus identication based on teeth is unfortunately difficult to obtain, and would probably require an interlibrary loan request: Garrick, J. A. F. (1982). Sharks of the genus Carcharhinus. US Dep. Commer. NOAA Tech. Rep. NMFS Circular, 445, 194. His shark teeth images are illustrations, but well done, and with a lot of descriptive information. Purdy et al. (2001) is also a good reference:(https://www.researchgate.net/publication/284595551_The_Neogene_sharks_rays_and_bony_fishes_from_Lee_Creek_Mine_Aurora_North_Carolina). You can find references to several papers related to fossil Carcharhinus, as well as a general overview of their fossil record, in my thesis. Finally, I'm attaching a figure from my thesis, illustrating the morphological terminology used: C. falciformis, upper right jaw, 5th position from symphysis. Feel free to add additional references or information about the genus Carcharhinus. Or if anything is incorrect in this post. The subject of fossil Carcharhinus tooth identification comes up fairly regularly in the forums, so let's try and stick as much information in here as possible!
  5. Some kind of dentition?

    Found at Myrtle Beach South Carolina, thought it might be some kind of ray tooth plating but it doesn't match any of the ray stuff I have, any ideas? One picture has the ray teeth I'm familiar with to the left of unknown piece.
  6. Small dromaeosaurid, oldie but goodie

    xinxuxiaolsmallestdinosazhaoianusmicrorapnaturezhonghetopost200010b4c14c3.pdf the other paper on this species(Hwang/Norell) is ,naturally,in Fruitbat's Library,possibly in some others as well salient points(or:"things you might want to remember about this article")(apart from osteological details): edit,hours later:possible repost,because I just noticed this one in Fruitbat's Library. Joe,i feel i owe you an apology. note Maniraptora (GAUTHIER): I posted the Gauthier,a very influential cladistic paper,a while back Note 2: "Archaeoraptor" turned out to be forged
  7. Hey everyone, I was just wondering what exactly intermediate teeth were and also what the difference between symphyseal and parasymphyseal teeth is. The small fourth tooth in the upper jaw of Carcharias taurus is marked as an intermediate. Thanks for any help!
  8. Troodontology

    sizetheropusapalaiosOntootroodontologgigant_the_Occurrence_of_Exceptionally_Large.pdf
  9. Do not try to pronounce this at home

    deklnqwebl_2012.pdf Outtake:
  10. What big teeth you have

    euheloptitanosaudentittheFULLTEXT01_(1).pdf outtake:
  11. This is my attempt at arranging the teeth. I thought it would be fun to try. I have no idea how to construct the actual jaw or how to do proper dentition. Dog provided for reference. The photos were too large to post so here are the links: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7QcbeYzTMs6MnBNbnlfcTJPcFk/view?usp=sharing https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7QcbeYzTMs6cFVDbVBaclBaanM/view?usp=sharing https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7QcbeYzTMs6VVNWdkVBNGVpMzQ/view?usp=sharing https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7QcbeYzTMs6NnJTMldiT08wbEk/view?usp=sharing https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7QcbeYzTMs6Q3h2cGhwTVN2VFk/view?usp=sharing https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7QcbeYzTMs6QWhPc2ROX1JRT1U/view?usp=sharing
  12. I recently acquired this megalodon tooth. It would have measured about 5.9 inches on the slant if the tip was intact, and measures 5.1 inches across. This question is for all you shark tooth dentition experts out there. I have never come across a megalodon tooth this big that appears to be a posterior which leads me to my first question, is it possible that this tooth came from a world class size megalodon with 7 inch teeth? I was also wondering what differentiates a megalodon from a chubutensis. I know that chubs have cusps, but it seems rather ambiguous to me with some megs appearing to have cusps or dips at the end of the blades. Thanks, Matt
  13. looking a gifted pdf in the mouth

    famo_miohiporgon.pdf fairly new,as these things go. Size:< 1 Mb "Statistical methods will better inform analyses that address the continent-wide issue of distinguishing Mesohippus from Miohippus. These two genera are difficult to distinguish(Stirton, 1940), but are considered distinct based on the presence and condition of the articular facet on the third metatarsal, which articulates with the cuboid; larger hypostyles; a longer face(*); and a deeper facial fossa (Prothero and Shubin, 1989; MacFadden,1998). The paleopopulation of John Day Miohippus is not adequate in addressing this issue because there are only five occurrences of Mesohippus in the entire assemblage. Very few specimens from the Turtle Cove assemblage were identified as Mesohippus, and those that were identified as such were determined to be statistically different from the specimens of Miohippus. " (*): for the ones among us who see the funny side of equid systematics
  14. After this horrendous attempt at a triple pun,things can only deteriorate,right? The list of species in the tags i have kept to a bare bones minimum,for clarity's sake i MIGHT not have posted this,but it figures tooth rows. Shark cognoscendi prolly already have this one(and the others by Bass)I'm sure. SO,no need to post those others orrep38a.pdf
  15. revisonary tactics

    edit: mind you,this one is fairly recent streetcaldhoffmannii_squammosrevisi!us.pdf
  16. mossy ,but not in the botanical sense

    caldwlcraniumosasaurdentitij.1.x.pdf Terrific paper from ZJLS,ignore at your own peril
  17. dinosaur teeth,part umpteen

    I hope some of you may like this
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