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Found 93 results

  1. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pycnostylus Coral with Favositdae Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Pycnostylus Ecology: stationary intermediate-level epifaunal microcarnivore. The genus Pycnostylus differs from Amplexus only in the circumstance that it grows in colonies of compound and apparently fasciculated corallites. Favosites is an extinct genus of tabulate coral characterized by polygonal closely packed corallites (giving it the common name "honeycomb coral"). The walls between corallites are pierced by pores known as mural pores which allowed transfer of nutrients between polyps. Favosites, like all coral, thrived in warm sunlit seas, forming colorful reefs, feeding by filtering microscopic plankton with their stinging tentacles. The genus had a worldwide distribution from the Late Ordovician to Late Permian. The split taxonomy: Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria/Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Rugosa/ Anthozoa, Subclass: †Tabulata Order: †Stauriida/†Favositida Family: †Pycnostylidae/†Favositidae Genus: †Pycnostylus/†Favosites
  2. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pycnostylus Coral with Favositdae Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Pycnostylus Ecology: stationary intermediate-level epifaunal microcarnivore. The genus Pycnostylus differs from Amplexus only in the circumstance that it grows in colonies of compound and apparently fasciculated corallites. Favosites is an extinct genus of tabulate coral characterized by polygonal closely packed corallites (giving it the common name "honeycomb coral"). The walls between corallites are pierced by pores known as mural pores which allowed transfer of nutrients between polyps. Favosites, like all coral, thrived in warm sunlit seas, forming colorful reefs, feeding by filtering microscopic plankton with their stinging tentacles. The genus had a worldwide distribution from the Late Ordovician to Late Permian. The split taxonomy: Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria/Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Rugosa/ Anthozoa, Subclass: †Tabulata Order: †Stauriida/†Favositida Family: †Pycnostylidae/†Favositidae Genus: †Pycnostylus/†Favosites
  3. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pycnostylus Coral with Favositdae Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Pycnostylus Ecology: stationary intermediate-level epifaunal microcarnivore. The genus Pycnostylus differs from Amplexus only in the circumstance that it grows in colonies of compound and apparently fasciculated corallites. Favosites is an extinct genus of tabulate coral characterized by polygonal closely packed corallites (giving it the common name "honeycomb coral"). The walls between corallites are pierced by pores known as mural pores which allowed transfer of nutrients between polyps. Favosites, like all coral, thrived in warm sunlit seas, forming colorful reefs, feeding by filtering microscopic plankton with their stinging tentacles. The genus had a worldwide distribution from the Late Ordovician to Late Permian. The split taxonomy: Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria/Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Rugosa/ Anthozoa, Subclass: †Tabulata Order: †Stauriida/†Favositida Family: †Pycnostylidae/†Favositidae Genus: †Pycnostylus/†Favosites
  4. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pycnostylus Coral with Favositdae Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Pycnostylus Ecology: stationary intermediate-level epifaunal microcarnivore. The genus Pycnostylus differs from Amplexus only in the circumstance that it grows in colonies of compound and apparently fasciculated corallites. Favosites is an extinct genus of tabulate coral characterized by polygonal closely packed corallites (giving it the common name "honeycomb coral"). The walls between corallites are pierced by pores known as mural pores which allowed transfer of nutrients between polyps. Favosites, like all coral, thrived in warm sunlit seas, forming colorful reefs, feeding by filtering microscopic plankton with their stinging tentacles. The genus had a worldwide distribution from the Late Ordovician to Late Permian. The split taxonomy: Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria/Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Rugosa/ Anthozoa, Subclass: †Tabulata Order: †Stauriida/†Favositida Family: †Pycnostylidae/†Favositidae Genus: †Pycnostylus/†Favosites
  5. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pycnostylus Coral with Favositdae Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Pycnostylus Ecology: stationary intermediate-level epifaunal microcarnivore. The genus Pycnostylus differs from Amplexus only in the circumstance that it grows in colonies of compound and apparently fasciculated corallites. Favosites is an extinct genus of tabulate coral characterized by polygonal closely packed corallites (giving it the common name "honeycomb coral"). The walls between corallites are pierced by pores known as mural pores which allowed transfer of nutrients between polyps. Favosites, like all coral, thrived in warm sunlit seas, forming colorful reefs, feeding by filtering microscopic plankton with their stinging tentacles. The genus had a worldwide distribution from the Late Ordovician to Late Permian. The split taxonomy: Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria/Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Rugosa/ Anthozoa, Subclass: †Tabulata Order: †Stauriida/†Favositida Family: †Pycnostylidae/†Favositidae Genus: †Pycnostylus/†Favosites
  6. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pycnostylus Coral with Favositdae Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Pycnostylus Ecology: stationary intermediate-level epifaunal microcarnivore. The genus Pycnostylus differs from Amplexus only in the circumstance that it grows in colonies of compound and apparently fasciculated corallites. Favosites is an extinct genus of tabulate coral characterized by polygonal closely packed corallites (giving it the common name "honeycomb coral"). The walls between corallites are pierced by pores known as mural pores which allowed transfer of nutrients between polyps. Favosites, like all coral, thrived in warm sunlit seas, forming colorful reefs, feeding by filtering microscopic plankton with their stinging tentacles. The genus had a worldwide distribution from the Late Ordovician to Late Permian. The split taxonomy: Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria/Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Rugosa/ Anthozoa, Subclass: †Tabulata Order: †Stauriida/†Favositida Family: †Pycnostylidae/†Favositidae Genus: †Pycnostylus/†Favosites
  7. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pycnostylus Coral with Favositdae Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Pycnostylus Ecology: stationary intermediate-level epifaunal microcarnivore. The genus Pycnostylus differs from Amplexus only in the circumstance that it grows in colonies of compound and apparently fasciculated corallites. Favosites is an extinct genus of tabulate coral characterized by polygonal closely packed corallites (giving it the common name "honeycomb coral"). The walls between corallites are pierced by pores known as mural pores which allowed transfer of nutrients between polyps. Favosites, like all coral, thrived in warm sunlit seas, forming colorful reefs, feeding by filtering microscopic plankton with their stinging tentacles. The genus had a worldwide distribution from the Late Ordovician to Late Permian. The split taxonomy: Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria/Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Rugosa/ Anthozoa, Subclass: †Tabulata Order: †Stauriida/†Favositida Family: †Pycnostylidae/†Favositidae Genus: †Pycnostylus/†Favosites
  8. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pycnostylus Coral with Favositdae Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Pycnostylus Ecology: stationary intermediate-level epifaunal microcarnivore. The genus Pycnostylus differs from Amplexus only in the circumstance that it grows in colonies of compound and apparently fasciculated corallites. Favosites is an extinct genus of tabulate coral characterized by polygonal closely packed corallites (giving it the common name "honeycomb coral"). The walls between corallites are pierced by pores known as mural pores which allowed transfer of nutrients between polyps. Favosites, like all coral, thrived in warm sunlit seas, forming colorful reefs, feeding by filtering microscopic plankton with their stinging tentacles. The genus had a worldwide distribution from the Late Ordovician to Late Permian. The split taxonomy: Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria/Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Rugosa/ Anthozoa, Subclass: †Tabulata Order: †Stauriida/†Favositida Family: †Pycnostylidae/†Favositidae Genus: †Pycnostylus/†Favosites
  9. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pycnostylus Coral with Favositdae Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Pycnostylus Ecology: stationary intermediate-level epifaunal microcarnivore. The genus Pycnostylus differs from Amplexus only in the circumstance that it grows in colonies of compound and apparently fasciculated corallites. Favosites is an extinct genus of tabulate coral characterized by polygonal closely packed corallites (giving it the common name "honeycomb coral"). The walls between corallites are pierced by pores known as mural pores which allowed transfer of nutrients between polyps. Favosites, like all coral, thrived in warm sunlit seas, forming colorful reefs, feeding by filtering microscopic plankton with their stinging tentacles. The genus had a worldwide distribution from the Late Ordovician to Late Permian. The split taxonomy: Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria/Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Rugosa/ Anthozoa, Subclass: †Tabulata Order: †Stauriida/†Favositida Family: †Pycnostylidae/†Favositidae Genus: †Pycnostylus/†Favosites
  10. Pycnostylus Coral a1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pycnostylus Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Pycnostylus Ecology: stationary intermediate-level epifaunal microcarnivore. The genus Pycnostylus differs from Amplexus only in the circumstance that it grows in colonies of compound and apparently fasciculated corallites. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Rugosa Order: †Stauriida Family: †Pycnostylidae Genus: †Pycnostylus
  11. Pycnostylus Coral a1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pycnostylus Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Pycnostylus Ecology: stationary intermediate-level epifaunal microcarnivore. The genus Pycnostylus differs from Amplexus only in the circumstance that it grows in colonies of compound and apparently fasciculated corallites. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Rugosa Order: †Stauriida Family: †Pycnostylidae Genus: †Pycnostylus
  12. Pycnostylus Coral a1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pycnostylus Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Pycnostylus Ecology: stationary intermediate-level epifaunal microcarnivore. The genus Pycnostylus differs from Amplexus only in the circumstance that it grows in colonies of compound and apparently fasciculated corallites. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Rugosa Order: †Stauriida Family: †Pycnostylidae Genus: †Pycnostylus
  13. Pycnostylus Coral a1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pycnostylus Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Pycnostylus Ecology: stationary intermediate-level epifaunal microcarnivore. The genus Pycnostylus differs from Amplexus only in the circumstance that it grows in colonies of compound and apparently fasciculated corallites. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Rugosa Order: †Stauriida Family: †Pycnostylidae Genus: †Pycnostylus
  14. Favosites Coral A1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Favosites Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Favosites is an extinct genus of tabulate coral characterized by polygonal closely packed corallites (giving it the common name "honeycomb coral"). The walls between corallites are pierced by pores known as mural pores which allowed transfer of nutrients between polyps. Favosites, like all coral, thrived in warm sunlit seas, forming colorful reefs, feeding by filtering microscopic plankton with their stinging tentacles. The genus had a worldwide distribution from the Late Ordovician to Late Permian. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum:Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Tabulata Order: †Favositida Family: †Favositidae Genus: †Favosites
  15. Favosites Coral A1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Favosites Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Favosites is an extinct genus of tabulate coral characterized by polygonal closely packed corallites (giving it the common name "honeycomb coral"). The walls between corallites are pierced by pores known as mural pores which allowed transfer of nutrients between polyps. Favosites, like all coral, thrived in warm sunlit seas, forming colorful reefs, feeding by filtering microscopic plankton with their stinging tentacles. The genus had a worldwide distribution from the Late Ordovician to Late Permian. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum:Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Tabulata Order: †Favositida Family: †Favositidae Genus: †Favosites
  16. Favosites Coral A1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Favosites Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Favosites is an extinct genus of tabulate coral characterized by polygonal closely packed corallites (giving it the common name "honeycomb coral"). The walls between corallites are pierced by pores known as mural pores which allowed transfer of nutrients between polyps. Favosites, like all coral, thrived in warm sunlit seas, forming colorful reefs, feeding by filtering microscopic plankton with their stinging tentacles. The genus had a worldwide distribution from the Late Ordovician to Late Permian. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum:Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Tabulata Order: †Favositida Family: †Favositidae Genus: †Favosites
  17. Favosites Coral A1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Favosites Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Favosites is an extinct genus of tabulate coral characterized by polygonal closely packed corallites (giving it the common name "honeycomb coral"). The walls between corallites are pierced by pores known as mural pores which allowed transfer of nutrients between polyps. Favosites, like all coral, thrived in warm sunlit seas, forming colorful reefs, feeding by filtering microscopic plankton with their stinging tentacles. The genus had a worldwide distribution from the Late Ordovician to Late Permian. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum:Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Tabulata Order: †Favositida Family: †Favositidae Genus: †Favosites
  18. Favosites Coral A1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Favosites Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Favosites is an extinct genus of tabulate coral characterized by polygonal closely packed corallites (giving it the common name "honeycomb coral"). The walls between corallites are pierced by pores known as mural pores which allowed transfer of nutrients between polyps. Favosites, like all coral, thrived in warm sunlit seas, forming colorful reefs, feeding by filtering microscopic plankton with their stinging tentacles. The genus had a worldwide distribution from the Late Ordovician to Late Permian. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum:Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Tabulata Order: †Favositida Family: †Favositidae Genus: †Favosites
  19. Favosites Coral A1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Favosites Coral Helderberg Limestone, found Central City area, Somerset County, PA; probably transported from Bedford County, PA Devonian Age (~400 Million Years ago) Favosites is an extinct genus of tabulate coral characterized by polygonal closely packed corallites (giving it the common name "honeycomb coral"). The walls between corallites are pierced by pores known as mural pores which allowed transfer of nutrients between polyps. Favosites, like all coral, thrived in warm sunlit seas, forming colorful reefs, feeding by filtering microscopic plankton with their stinging tentacles. The genus had a worldwide distribution from the Late Ordovician to Late Permian. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum:Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa, Subclass: †Tabulata Order: †Favositida Family: †Favositidae Genus: †Favosites
  20. Horn Coral Arizona.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose (Horn) Coral, Arizona Payson, Arizona,USA Devonian age (~380 million years ago) The coral has long ago agatized or fossilized but still retains the coral horn pattern that makes these pieces unique in the horn coral family. The Rugosa, also called the Tetracorallia, are an extinct order of solitary and colonial corals that were abundant in Middle Ordovician to Late Permian seas. Solitary rugosans (e.g., Caninia, Lophophyllidium, Neozaphrentis, Streptelasma) are often referred to as horn corals because of a unique horn-shaped chamber with a wrinkled, or rugose, wall. Some solitary rugosans reached nearly a meter in length. However, some species of rugose corals could form large colonies (e.g., Lithostrotion). When radiating septa were present, they were usually in multiples of four, hence Tetracoralla in contrast to modern Hexacoralla, colonial polyps generally with sixfold symmetry. Rugose corals have a skeleton made of calcite that is often fossilized. Like modern corals (Scleractinia), rugose corals were invariably benthic, living on the sea floor or in a reef-framework. Some symbiotic rugose corals were endobionts of Stromatoporoidea, especially in the Silurian period. Rugose corals will also always have a columella, an axial rod which supports the septa running up the center of the corallite. It is present in rugose corals because they were mainly solitary and so required the extra support. Tabulate corals have no columella because they were always colonial and relied on the support of neighboring corallites. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  21. Rugose Coral, Morocco P1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Horn Coral Morocco Devonian age (~400 million years ago) The Rugosa, also called the Tetracorallia, are an extinct order of solitary and colonial corals that were abundant in Middle Ordovician to Late Permian seas. Solitary rugosans (e.g., Caninia, Lophophyllidium, Neozaphrentis, Streptelasma) are often referred to as horn corals because of a unique horn-shaped chamber with a wrinkled, or rugose, wall. Some solitary rugosans reached nearly a meter in length. However, some species of rugose corals could form large colonies (e.g., Lithostrotion). When radiating septa were present, they were usually in multiples of four, hence Tetracoralla in contrast to modern Hexacoralla, colonial polyps generally with sixfold symmetry. Rugose corals have a skeleton made of calcite that is often fossilized. Like modern corals (Scleractinia), rugose corals were invariably benthic, living on the sea floor or in a reef-framework. Some symbiotic rugose corals were endobionts of Stromatoporoidea, especially in the Silurian period. Rugose corals will also always have a columella, an axial rod which supports the septa running up the center of the corallite. It is present in rugose corals because they were mainly solitary and so required the extra support. Tabulate corals have no columella because they were always colonial and relied on the support of neighboring corallites. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  22. Rugose Coral, Morocco P1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Horn Coral Morocco Devonian age (~400 million years ago) The Rugosa, also called the Tetracorallia, are an extinct order of solitary and colonial corals that were abundant in Middle Ordovician to Late Permian seas. Solitary rugosans (e.g., Caninia, Lophophyllidium, Neozaphrentis, Streptelasma) are often referred to as horn corals because of a unique horn-shaped chamber with a wrinkled, or rugose, wall. Some solitary rugosans reached nearly a meter in length. However, some species of rugose corals could form large colonies (e.g., Lithostrotion). When radiating septa were present, they were usually in multiples of four, hence Tetracoralla in contrast to modern Hexacoralla, colonial polyps generally with sixfold symmetry. Rugose corals have a skeleton made of calcite that is often fossilized. Like modern corals (Scleractinia), rugose corals were invariably benthic, living on the sea floor or in a reef-framework. Some symbiotic rugose corals were endobionts of Stromatoporoidea, especially in the Silurian period. Rugose corals will also always have a columella, an axial rod which supports the septa running up the center of the corallite. It is present in rugose corals because they were mainly solitary and so required the extra support. Tabulate corals have no columella because they were always colonial and relied on the support of neighboring corallites. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  23. Rugose Coral, Morocco P1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Horn Coral Morocco Devonian age (~400 million years ago) The Rugosa, also called the Tetracorallia, are an extinct order of solitary and colonial corals that were abundant in Middle Ordovician to Late Permian seas. Solitary rugosans (e.g., Caninia, Lophophyllidium, Neozaphrentis, Streptelasma) are often referred to as horn corals because of a unique horn-shaped chamber with a wrinkled, or rugose, wall. Some solitary rugosans reached nearly a meter in length. However, some species of rugose corals could form large colonies (e.g., Lithostrotion). When radiating septa were present, they were usually in multiples of four, hence Tetracoralla in contrast to modern Hexacoralla, colonial polyps generally with sixfold symmetry. Rugose corals have a skeleton made of calcite that is often fossilized. Like modern corals (Scleractinia), rugose corals were invariably benthic, living on the sea floor or in a reef-framework. Some symbiotic rugose corals were endobionts of Stromatoporoidea, especially in the Silurian period. Rugose corals will also always have a columella, an axial rod which supports the septa running up the center of the corallite. It is present in rugose corals because they were mainly solitary and so required the extra support. Tabulate corals have no columella because they were always colonial and relied on the support of neighboring corallites. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  24. Rugose Coral, Morocco P1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Horn Coral Morocco Devonian age (~400 million years ago) The Rugosa, also called the Tetracorallia, are an extinct order of solitary and colonial corals that were abundant in Middle Ordovician to Late Permian seas. Solitary rugosans (e.g., Caninia, Lophophyllidium, Neozaphrentis, Streptelasma) are often referred to as horn corals because of a unique horn-shaped chamber with a wrinkled, or rugose, wall. Some solitary rugosans reached nearly a meter in length. However, some species of rugose corals could form large colonies (e.g., Lithostrotion). When radiating septa were present, they were usually in multiples of four, hence Tetracoralla in contrast to modern Hexacoralla, colonial polyps generally with sixfold symmetry. Rugose corals have a skeleton made of calcite that is often fossilized. Like modern corals (Scleractinia), rugose corals were invariably benthic, living on the sea floor or in a reef-framework. Some symbiotic rugose corals were endobionts of Stromatoporoidea, especially in the Silurian period. Rugose corals will also always have a columella, an axial rod which supports the septa running up the center of the corallite. It is present in rugose corals because they were mainly solitary and so required the extra support. Tabulate corals have no columella because they were always colonial and relied on the support of neighboring corallites. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  25. Rugose Coral, Morocco P1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Horn Coral Morocco Devonian age (~400 million years ago) The Rugosa, also called the Tetracorallia, are an extinct order of solitary and colonial corals that were abundant in Middle Ordovician to Late Permian seas. Solitary rugosans (e.g., Caninia, Lophophyllidium, Neozaphrentis, Streptelasma) are often referred to as horn corals because of a unique horn-shaped chamber with a wrinkled, or rugose, wall. Some solitary rugosans reached nearly a meter in length. However, some species of rugose corals could form large colonies (e.g., Lithostrotion). When radiating septa were present, they were usually in multiples of four, hence Tetracoralla in contrast to modern Hexacoralla, colonial polyps generally with sixfold symmetry. Rugose corals have a skeleton made of calcite that is often fossilized. Like modern corals (Scleractinia), rugose corals were invariably benthic, living on the sea floor or in a reef-framework. Some symbiotic rugose corals were endobionts of Stromatoporoidea, especially in the Silurian period. Rugose corals will also always have a columella, an axial rod which supports the septa running up the center of the corallite. It is present in rugose corals because they were mainly solitary and so required the extra support. Tabulate corals have no columella because they were always colonial and relied on the support of neighboring corallites. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
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