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Found 1,300 results

  1. Supplementing the post in “Fossil Hunting Trips” about the Devonian Plabutsch-formation in Styria, Austria (with some background info): http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/90431-some-fossil-hunting-in-the-plabutsch-formation-of-the-palaeozoic-of-graz-styria-austria-devonian-–-eifelian/ I would like to post some more fossil specimens in this thread. More specimens will follow from time to time (hopefully). The first two specimens contain abundant branches of the tabulate coral Striatopora? suessi. Field pics of these specimens are already posted in the hunting trip, but here you can see also their side views, showing the alingment of the individual coral branches. (I don´t know why pics don´t look good here, but if you are zooming in, they are ok).
  2. As there are some polished fossil-rock specimens from this formation in the Christmas auction, I would like to present some background info with (mostly) some field photographs, so I have put this in “Fossil Hunting Trips”. The Palaeozoic of Graz is a thrust sheet within the Eastern Alps, composed of Silurian to Pennsylvanian sediments. It consists of three separate nappes, the most fossiliferous formation is the Plabutsch-formation within the Rannach nappe. This Devonian formation is of Eifelian age (ca. 395 Ma), about 100 m thick and mostly made up of a very dark, gray-blueish to black, fine-grained, thickly bedded limestone. Superficially, it weathers to a medium to light grey color. Geological map of Styria with the Palaeozoic of Graz situated north of Graz. Stratigraphic column of the Rannach nappe of the Palaeozoic of Graz, Plabutsch-formation is Nr. 4. From Hubmann & Gross, 2015. Thicknesses of formations are not to scale! The Plabutsch-formation crops out at various places to the west and north of Graz and more than 100 fossil sites are known within this formation. The most abundant fossils are corals, brachiopods, stromatoporids and crinoid fragments. Other fossils like gastropods, bivalves or trilo-bits are very rare. In a paper from 1975, about 50 coral species are listed, but less than 10 are abundant: Tabulata: Favosites styriacus Penecke, 1894 Pachycanalicula barrandei (Penecke, 1887) Thamnopora boloniensis (Gosselet, 1877) Thamnopora reticulata (Blainville, 1830) Striatiopora? suessi Penecke, 1894 Rugosa: Thamnophyllum stachei Penecke, 1894 Zelophyllia cornuvaccinum (Penecke, 1894) Do you feel that there is something strange with this list? Yes, it is! Most species have their type locality within this formation and were first described by Penecke, except T. boloniensis (T. reticulata was also erected by Penecke as Pachypora orthostachys and later synonymized with an earlier described species). In my opinion, this does not reflect a high degree of endemism, but an urgent need for revision… The most abundant fossil is Favosites styriacus, which can form massive colonies up to 0.5 m in size. Here is an example from Hohe Rannach Mt. (1018 m) north of Graz, photo 05/26/2018, Col-Nr. 4093, length of pocket knife is 9 cm: As most fossils in this formation, it was found in scree and float in a wooded area. Nr. 4093 is waiting near the pocket knife toward the lower right corner… Another Favosites styriacus, north of Fürstenstand Mt. (754 m), northwest of Graz, photo 10/30/2015, not in collection. Tabulae are very well visible, weathering is usually your friend there!
  3. Guidebook to the Penn Dixie Site, New York

    Bastedo, J.C., 2006. The Penn Dixie Site - A Classic And Unique Paleontological & Outdoor Education Center. Guidebook for Field Trips, New York State Geological Association 78th Annual Meeting October 6-8, 2006, Field trip B4 (78), p.396. The above guidebook to the Penn Dixie Site is found in the 2006 Guidebook for the New York Geological Association at: http://www.nysga-online.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/2006_bookmarked.pdf http://www.nysga-online.net/guidebooks/1925-1955/ http://www.nysga-online.net/guidebooks/ A revised version of this guidebook is: Bastedo, J.C., 2013. The Penn Dixie Paleontological and Outdoor Education Center: An Internationally Renown Multidisciplinary Educational, Cultural, Recreational and Tourist Attraction. Guidebook for Field Trips, New York State Geological Association 85th Annual Meeting 20 – 22 September 2013, Field trip. pp. 54-67. http://www.nysga-online.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/2013.pdf http://www.nysga-online.net/guidebooks/1925-1955/ http://www.nysga-online.net/guidebooks/ Yours, Paul H.
  4. Hey all! First time poster. Found a few fossils along the Milwaukee River in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Looking online, it appears this area was a Devonian Reef. I don't have a lot of experience in fossils besides plants, so any ID or commentary is helpful. A few of these I just found as pieces in big piles along a rock formation, I tried to put up a ruler for scale. For the one piece in situ, I didn't have anything handy, but it wasn't more than a few cm across. Thanks!
  5. The colonies of this rather common tubulate coral are more or less circular in outline.
  6. I spent a few hours fossil hunting on two separate trips on Forest Service land in Montana. The first trip was this past spring looking for Late Oligocene - Early Micoene flora about 90 minutes outside of Missoula. The second trip was during at stint over the summer at a fire lookout tower in the Flathead where I spent just a few hours one morning looking at Devonian and Mississippian marine layers. Besides the obvious, the trips were quite different. The spring trip was a drive to a road cut on a Forest Service road while the summer trip was a seven mile hike in. Additionally the medium is completely different; flakey, brittle shale compared with big, blocky limestone. You can keep non-vertebrate fossils as long as you don't plan to sell them. Prior to heading to an area, I look through publicly available research, lectures, field trips, etc. to find possible localities. I only found limited information on possible identification of the Late Oligocene - Early Micoene flora and most of if was unpublished graduate work from a nearby site with only some overlap on species. Please feel free to correct any id's or throw new ones out! I believe these are cercocarpus, a mahogany.
  7. A slow-moving low-level epifaunal detritivore-suspension feeder. Lit.: W.M. Lehmann. 1957. Die Asterozoen in den Dachschiefern des rheinischen Unterdevons. Abhandlungen des Hessischen Landesamtes für Bodenforschung 21:1-160
  8. Prionoceras sp.

    Personally collected, April 2017.
  9. When Did Fish Learn to Walk? Antarctica May Hold the Answer Eric Niilen, Wired Science, November 21, 2018, https://www.wired.com/story/fish-learn-to-walk-antarctica-evolution-tetrapods/ PDF files about papers about tetrapod evolution can be found at: Edward B Daeschler https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Edward_Daeschler/research Adam C. Maloof https://www.researchgate.net/scientific-contributions/15584512_Adam_C_Maloof Yours, Paul H.
  10. Everyone, Any help appreciated. It has been cast and is being referred to others as well. This is a large shale slab fro the Devonian which appears to have been flipped over from stream bottom during a heavy flood event. So this is most likely a positive of an actual negative trace. i.e. a perfect squiggly "groove" 3 feet long. Marc
  11. Bdellacoma verruculosa Lehmann, 1957

    From the album Invertebrates

    Bdellacoma verruculosa Lehmann, 1957 Early Devonian Early Emsian Bundenbach Hunsrück Germany Width 20cm
  12. Crinoid stem segments from arkona Ontario.
  13. Cephalopod id

    Can anyone give me for information about this Cephalopod? Found in Pike County PA near the Delaware Water Gap National Rec. Area. Devonian shale. The wide end is 3/4", the visible part is 1 1/4" long.
  14. Bundenbachia beneckei STUERTZ, 1886

    From the album Invertebrates

    Bundenbachia beneckei STUERTZ, 1886 Early Devonian Early Emsian Bundenbach Rhineland-Palatinate Germany
  15. Baliactis scutatus Lehmann, 1957

    From the album Invertebrates

    Baliactis scutatus Lehmann, 1957 Early Devonian Early Emsian Bundenbach Quarry Eschenbach Hunsrück Rhineland-Palatinate Germany
  16. Devonian Mystery Hypostome (to me)

    I found these items while working through the calcareous shale my wife and I collected from Paulding Ohio this summer. This material is primarily from the Devonian aged Silica Shale. I found one and didn't think too much about it, a fragment of fish/trilobite/shell or something else perhaps. Then I found a second which looked similar and so I did some prep and was able to expose more of each piece. These are small (those are mm's on the scale) with the biggest one being about 10mm by 12mm and the smaller one a little over half that size. They don't look like anything I'm familiar with nor could I find any matches in numerous books or online sites. I know the pictures are not ideal and they are embedded in the rock, so nothing from the side or underneath (first two pictures are the same one). They are very dark in color like much of the trilobite material. Oh snarge, it just dawned on me. Are these hypostomes? I don't think I have ever seen one before. Maybe I answered my own question, but I typed all this already so I'm going to post it just to make sure. Thanks, any ideas would be appreciated. Now I see a thread from 2011, so yes, these are hypostomes, but I'm uncertain on which species it is from. Looking for examples from Eldredgeops and Pseudodechenella since those seem to be the genera present in the Silica.
  17. I love collecting Devonian corals. No two are exactly alike and some like this specimen are much rarer then the most collectible fossil (complete trilobites from any period) from New York. Confluens is a highly sought after coral species. Only found in a very limited area. I find one colony for every 500 solitary Heliophyllum halli and only one colony in ten is complete like this specimen. That's why this piece had to be prepped. Well preserved epibionts can be seen in great detail thanks to the meticulous prep job. Heliophyllum halli confluens (Hall, 1877) Middle Devonian colonial rugose coral 88mm x 71mm x 60mm. Found 9/12/2018 in Livingston County, New York. Found - Mikeymig, Prep - Malcolm T. BEFORE AND AFTER PREP PICTURES
  18. Palaeopalaemon newberryi Chagrin shale Devonian Northeast Ohio, USA Specimens were used in the publication “Morphology and paleoecology of the oldest lobster-like decapod, Palaeopalaemon newberryi Whitfield, 1880”, Journal of Crustacean Biology (2018). Smithsonian USNM (United States National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC, USA). USNM numbers 617309 617308 617309 618374 706118 Morphology and paleoecology of the oldest lobster-like decapod, Palaeopalaemon newberryi .pdf PP letter of provenance.pdf
  19. Which Pseuodechenella Is This?

    I have a mostly complete trilobite that I found this summer at Paulding, Ohio (SIlica Fm, Devonian) which I had assumed was a Pseudodechenella lucasensis, partly because it looks like one and that was the only species of Pseudodechenella that I was familiar with from the Silica (granted, I'm no expert, I've just done some reading). But in looking at this specimen a bit closer and reading a few of the articles, particularly Stumm's 1965 description of the species, I'm having some doubt on the ID and want to solicit the opinion of the Forum. I know there are several Devonian trilobite enthusiasts out there and I would appreciate your thoughts. The primary feature that has me questioning the ID is the lack of a medial groove on the brim of the cephalon which according to Stumm is supposed to be one of the diagnostic features. I don't see one on this specimen, but could that be a matter of preservation, growth stage, or just variability within the species? I have seen that P. alpenensis is also found in the Silica Fm. but that appears to have a much wider brim that what this specimen has (about 1mm wide). There are plenty of other species of Pseudodechenella from other areas of the same age and I have looked at lots of pictures, but not picked an obvious match. Stumm made a comparison to P. rowi, but I am not aware of this species being found in the Silica Fm. I am working on gathering the descriptions of these various species so I can see if that helps me, but I thought I'd see what some of you thought. Any ideas are welcome, thanks. The scale is mm's, it is about 19mm long.
  20. My fossil collection

    This is my fossil collection please show us yours!!! These are my display fossils only The first picture is a large unidentified fossil shark tooth I recently bought from a local fossil store. The second is my display collection I put fossils in once they have been prepared or bought. The next photo is Madagascar copal it is about 9 million years old and it has multiple inclusions including fly's, wasps, and spiders. The next is an unidentified fish fossil in good shape but not too valuable. The fifth fossil is a trilobite (paralejurus) in Devonian limestone it is 385 million years old and was found in morocco I know the most about this one. And last but not least is my small polished chunk of Baltic amber it is 35-50 million years old and contains a winged insect inclusion as you probably know amber is fossilised tree resin and copal is hardened tree resin that is not quite fossilised. Thanks, HAPPY HUNTING!!!!!!!
  21. Eldredgeops rana

    From the album Trilobites

    Eldredgeops rana Collected in October, 2018. Penn Dixie (Hamburg, NY). Self-prepared using OMAX trinocular scope, ARO scribe, Paasche air eraser using dolomite at variable pressures. Preparation time: ~1 hour.
  22. Greenops widderensis

    From the album Trilobites

    Four enrolled Greenops widderensis collected June 2018, prepared by K. Brett. Mid-Devonian Hamilton Gp. Widder Fm. Arkona/Thedford
  23. The title explains it but for a little more prepping or starting prep need to know roughly what it is before I can be comfortable in my work appears to have a rather odd placed general spine on the right and the head is not shaped like a holladrops. Thanks in advance Matt
  24. Loriolaster mirabilis Stuertz, 1886

    From the album Invertebrates

    Loriolaster mirabilis Stuertz, 1886 Early Devonian Early Emsian Bundenbach Quarry Eschenbach Germany Diameter 8cm
  25. Greenops fourplex

    Back at the end of June at our spot in the Thedford area a small group of us were busy making benches and unlocking slabs from the Widder Formation. Once we got to splitting, one lucky split resulted in finding three Greenops widderensis on a single plate. With flying genal spines and lappets on an already delicate and thin-skinned species, it was nothing short of miraculous that I was able to get it to the car with no damage. Right away I applied cyanoacrylate, and then it started to rain. This is how it looked in the field:
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