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Found 1,234 results

  1. Madison County, NY Identification

    I found these fossils while collecting at several locations in Madison County, NY. I have no clue what it could be. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  2. Hi everybody, I am looking for a good and complete Hyneria tooth from the Devonian of Red Hill. Feel free to contact me if you have something nice. I can give good material, I have many stuff from the Solnhofen area and more. Best wishes from France :-) Frederic
  3. Devonian BBQ

    Yesterday I visited my favoriet hunting spot with a few friends. Since the weather forcast was realy good we made sure to bring a portable bbq, meat and drinks. Me and my girlfriend were the first at the location, we made a quick prospect for devonian cephalopods, but there hasn't been a lot of activity in the quarry since our last visit. Once the group was complete we tried our luck in older parts of the quarry, but only a few cephalopods were found. At lunchtime we set up our little bbq and equipment and enjoyed our lunch ( this was fossil hunting in style ) the afternoon we continued our search for fossils. only one extra large goniatite was found by a friend, on the other hand, my girfriend made an exellent discovery, she found a large piece of placoderm that is likely to belong of the same specimen we found last year, it wil soon join the rest of the pieces that are being preped at the museum now. On the way home we made a quick stop for prospection in an other quarry, but appart from a few nice calcite cristals we had no luck here. Still, we had a realy fun day one of the 2 goniatites I found that day: Lunchtime Hexagonaria next to the BBQ: the placoderm fragment found by my girlfriend ( Natalie81 ) The large goniatite of my friend calcite crystals from the next spot:
  4. Part three to my safekeeping series. These are some of my finds from the middle Devonian Mahantango Formation of Maryland. Unlike the other formations I posted about, this one is pretty well known for it's fossil contents, so I will keep the introduction and background brief. For those who don't know the Mahantango is a middle Devonian aged marine shale that's part of the Hamilton Group in Maryland. For the most part it's fauna is dominated by brachiopods, but occasional gastropods, tentaculitids, and other animals show up as well. It was deposited in a shallow inland sea with the depth of the sea varying over time. This is only a small fraction of what I have, but it's some of the best. Image 1: Spiriferid brachiopod, Mucrospirifer mucronatus? Image 2: Some odd fragment (possibly trilobite related?) with a M. mucronatus. Image 3: M. mucronatus.
  5. Went out for a few days with the family and did some fossil hunting at Schoharie Creek with some pleasant surprises. I searched mostly in some eroded cliffs and had the best luck by using weathered shells to find a productive layer. I then carefully started splitting. I found a lot of marine life that is very similar to what is found at the Deep Springs rd. quarry in NY. Greenops pygidiums were common and I found what I think are crinoid stems. Also present were what I think are some Cephalopod Orthoconic forms and some cool bivalves.
  6. What on earth is this?

    I have a regular collecting spot in Capon Bridge, WV, which is my go-to spot for Eldredgeops Rana trilobites. On my most recent outing I picked up this odd thing, and I have no idea what to make of it. There is a pencil just to the left of the fossil, for scale. The fossil is fairly flat, hardly three-dimensional, so no need for side photos. It appears to be three-pronged and pyritized.. pyritized in the same way that the trilobites often are at this location. The local shale is early to middle Devonian, I *think* Needmore Formation. Any thoughts welcome!
  7. I don't throw around the word "best" casually, but I think it's safe to say that my recent trip was one of the best in all my years collecting, if not the best. I spent the better part of five or six hours collecting at numerous different sites across western Maryland ranging in age from the lower Devonian to the lower Mississippian, so this is part one of my posts (for simplicity's sake I may include photos of most of my other finds from these sites even if I didn't collect them last go around). The trip started off okay. I visited a couple of my oldest sites that are some small roadside exposures of the Oriskany Sandstone and Mahantango Formation. These sites produced decent material in the past, but over the repeated years of collecting I seem to have worn them out as this time all I found were some brachiopods (including a decent Mucrospirifer sp. from the Mahantango site). I'll talk more about these finds later, but afterwards I found time to visit a new site in the Brallier Formation. By this point it had started to thunder, and while driving to the site the rain started to come in and fog filled up the valley. I thought it was the end of my trip, but as I got to the site it was pretty much dry. My best guess is that I was simply hearing a storm from way off in the distance. The site I visited, as I recently learned, might actually expose two different formations: the Brallier Formation and the Foreknobs Formation. The difficulty in discerning between the various upper Devonian formations in Maryland is multifold. First off, the MGS doesn't differentiate the Harrell, Brallier, and Scherr Formations, even on their most recent geologic maps. Second of all the literature around these deposits is scant and very dated. Most still use the (now) incorrect Woodmont and Chemung Formations, which further exacerbates problems as the Woodmont Formation consisted of the current Brallier and Scherr Formations, making it difficult for an amateur like me to really tell just which fossils occur in either formation. On top of this the contact between the Harrell, Brallier, Scherr, and Foreknobs is mostly gradational, so the differentiating layers lithologically is next to impossible as the beds gradually blend into one another. Generally speaking the Harrell is a dark shale with a fossiliferous limestone (the Tully Limestone) demarcating it's base, the Brallier is mostly dark, fissile shale with interbeds of siltstone, the Scherr is mostly lighter colored shale and siltstone with some sandstone beds, and the Foreknobs is a mixture of gray shales, red shales, conglomerate, sandstone, and siltstone. A guide fossil for the Brallier is the brittle star trace fossil Pteridichnites biseriatus, which was the fossil I originally set out to collect and found in the darker shale. Generally speaking the brachiopod genus Cyrtospirifer sp. in particular C. disjunctus is a guide fossil for the Foreknobs, but I believe this genus also occurs in the Brallier Formation. I found both fossils at this site, the brittle star in the dark shale and the brachiopod in a reddish siltstone, and considering the transition in rock types (one end of the site was just dark, fissile shale and the other had significant amounts of conglomerate and siltstone with shell beds) I think it's likely that the upper end of the cut was in the basal Foreknobs Formation and the lower end was in the upper layers of the Brallier Formation. As such, all of my trace fossils are from the Brallier and almost all of my other fossils are from the Foreknobs. The Brallier Formation is a late Devonian turbidite unit that was deposited in fairly deep water as the Acadian Mountains eroded. It is mostly unfossiliferous, but does have the occasional pelycopod, gastropod, and trace fossil (these being the most common). Ammonoids are also reported from the Brallier. Like I said earlier I originally came trying to find the brittle star trace fossil Pteridichnites but I ended up finding some other very interesting trace fossils. I picked up two of them because I had seen images of similar looking things from the Pennsylvanian of Alabama which I believe @Rockin' Ric labeled as resting traces from horseshoe crabs. These are late Devonian, deep water marine in origin, not terrestrial/freshwater from the Pennsylvanian, so I don't really know what they could be. Perhaps from some other arthropod? Anyways I also found some brittle star traces, including a group of what look to be four or five Pteridichnites biseriatus oriented in life position as if it were an imprint of the brittle star body. Image 1: Pteridichnites biseriatus Image 2: A group of four poorly preserved P. biseriatus Image 3: Unknown arthropod (?) trace fossil Image 4: Unknown arthropod (?) trace fossil If any of you guys know what the last two fossils are, please feel free to let me know.
  8. Fish bone or tectonics??

    Yesterday a collague found while he was fishing in a little river nearby Koblenz called ´Nette´ this plate. The slate or greywacke is devonian age. The first time when I saw the pics yestrerday on whatsapp I was really exhausted - maybe a big fish - something like Dunkleosteus or something like this. But today I got the plate, cleaned it and now I think that he found some tectonic marks or microtectonic structures - perhaps somebody has seen something like this before - I´m happy for some further informations .... thanks Chris
  9. Devonian ID

    I found this one a while back and have a idea of what it is but still wanted to get your opinions. The rock is about 2.5 inches long and is from a beach on the Lake Erie shore. Devonian. Thanks in advance!
  10. Briggs Road 7/29/18

    I have finally got a chance to get back to do a hunt, in the Devonian of New York. It seems like it has been forever since the last time I hunted for trilos. Aleast a month or two I think? Today I went out with only my youngest child Devin. We only stayed for 2 hours, but this trip certainly got the blood flowing. I went back to Briggs road and hit up the same spot that I have been working on all year. I have to say I am getting very excited buy the size of the specimens that I found today. First thing I found was a Eldredgeops cephalon laying on the ground. Doesn't sound very impressive does it? Well the fact that it measured 4 cm or 1 1/2 inches wide should. Most whole trilos barely reach that size! I found other bigger, then normal partials with a few possible whole ones. The size really gives me an idea that there may be some bigger bugs hiding there than what I had previouly thought. I also found a large partial Greenops Cephalon and partial Greenops thorax and pygidium. Plus two Dipleura cephalons unfortunately they all ended up crumbling from just the short time they sat in the sun. I should of gotten them to the car sooner. Here are pics of just what I brought home. A lot of partials were left behind.
  11. I thought about doing a personal study of the relationship of Athyris spiriferoides, in relation to other abyssal species that shared seafloor space with these Brachiopods. I have over 900 samples for the population study and now it's time to count brachs with nothing on them and all others with signs of the other species. So far most are symbiotic, a few shown signs of predatory sponge borings. To name some friendly attachments: bryzoans, crinoids, corals and some affinities I need to look up. I'll plan on highlighting examples and findings later.
  12. From the album Middle Devonian

    Bivalves, a gastropod, a bryozoan (Fenestella sp.), and a brachiopod (Mediospirifer) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Route 209 road cut Wurtsboro, N.Y.
  13. From the album Middle Devonian

    Pseudoaviculopecten princeps (partial bivalve shell with (worm?) borings) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Route 209 road cut Wurtsboro, N.Y.
  14. From the album Middle Devonian

    Modiomorpha mytiloides (palaeoheterodont bivalve) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Route 209 road cut Wurtsboro, N.Y.
  15. From the album Middle Devonian

    Michelinoceras (nautiloid) Goniophora hamiltonensis (bivalve) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Route 209 road cut Wurtsboro, N.Y.
  16. From the album Middle Devonian

    Goniophora hamiltonensis (palaeoheterodon bivalve) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Route 209 road cut Wurtsboro, N.Y. Goniophora is an uncommon bivalve in Central New York, but shares dominance with Modiomorpha here.
  17. From the album Middle Devonian

    Michelinoceras telamon (straight-shelled nautiloid) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Route 209 road cut Wurtsboro, N.Y.
  18. Hello all, My good friend Jeffrey P and I were finally able to coordinate a day out hunting together in our favorite Devonian spot upstate, as well as one I hadn't visited yet. ( The Briggs Road site!) Both are Moscow Formation, Hamilton group Middle Devonian sites. I haven't been out much this year, and so I decided to take a floating holiday to make it happen. We had missed the opportunity of collecting together when we were both in Western NY during the 4th of July week. This is usually a really fun get together, and while I did OK at our usual haunt, I did miss my frequent collecting partner's company. Anyway, as stated, ... I took a Monday off of work to make the trip to see Jeff last Monday, ... July 16th. Jeff generously offered to drive to the sites. Deep Springs Road is about a 4.5 hour trip for me to make from my home. But with Jeff driving, I only had to drive an hour to meet him at a commuter lot off of I-84 in New York. We met up at 6:00 AM, moved my gear to his car, and off we went. The 3.5 hour drive to the site was full of good conversation and tales of his adventures, and our hopeful find list for this trip. Jeff had brought his I-pad with him, so that I could peruse photos of his recent fossil finds and vacation adventures, (here, and abroad.) during the trip. The weather forecast was calling for a partly cloudy day, with a high of 89. The slight chance of rain that was forecast never materialized. We arrived at the first site between 9:30 and 10:00 AM. Briggs road is a small roadside quarry. Lots of broken rock was around - evidence of other area hunters. We spent about 40 minutes here, Jeff working some slabs, while I did my wander and split thing. I was unlucky enough to flip over a rock and find a yellow-jacket nest. Luckily, I got away without being stung. It definitely agitated the yellow-jackets, though. I picked up a few things, here and there. Mostly 3/4partial Eldredgeops rana, missing the cephalons. Nothing worth photographing. With the Yellow-Jackets guarding the productive layer, we headed over to Deep Springs Road. *************************************************************************************** By this time, the sun was getting higher in the sky, and it was starting to get hot. Deep Springs Road Quarry is like a parking lot. The gray matrix gets hot to the touch, and there is little shade. After about an hour of poking around, and 2 20 OZ bottles of water later, I decided to try to find some shade. I was finding some cool things here and there. I took shelter under a thorn bush that provided a bit of respite from the heat. I pulled rocks over and split them as I sat on a kneeling pad and rested my elbow on my bandana, drinking water now and again. Hydration is important. Jeff was a trooper, and spent most of his time in the full sun, lifting out blocks and splitting them down. Moving about the quarry from spot to spot. He said that he was in "training" for his trip out to Texas later this summer. I broke for lunch, and a cold seltzer refreshed me, and gave me a second wind. I made a number of good finds, and was happy, as this was only my 3rd time out collecting this year. Life has been busy, so it was nice to make up for lost time. Jeff did not do as well, although he found some interesting pieces things. My luck was with me, and a number of my finds were found just by looking at the ground. I'm not a real motivated digger when I don't have to be, and am content finding what others have missed. I like to split things down until there is no chance that a fossil is hiding. Anyway, these techniques worked in my favor this time. The day went on, and shade started to appear. Jeff took a break, and recharged himself with some time in the shade. By nearly 5:00 PM we decided we were done. We packed up our gear and finds, and headed out on the road. I enjoyed the conversation with Jeff, and his eclectic taste in music. Always relaxing and interesting music of all varieties coming from his car stereo/ipod hook-up. Actually made some notes on bands to check out when I had the chance. We arrived at the commuter lot at around 9:25 PM, said our goodbyes, and I headed for home. With traffic and all, I reached home at about 10:40 PM. Thanks @Jeffrey P, for a great day out hunting. ****************************************************************************************** I ended up having quite the day with phyllocarids. I ended up with 10 partialphyllocarids - 2 Echinocaris punctata, and 8 partial Rhinocaris columbina . Only a few trilobites - 1 enrolled Eldredgeops rana, one enrolled Greenops sp., one prone partial Greenops sp., and 3 Dipleura dekayi pygidiums. A host of gastropods, bivalves, and brachiopods found their way home with me as well. First - a grouping of my finds. and some close ups ... Trilobites: Dipleura dekayi pygidiums Eldredgeops rana Greenops sp. Greenops sp. Phyllocarids: Rhinocaris columbina Rhinocaris columbina Echinocaris punctata Gastropods: Paleozygopleura hamiltonae covered with bryozoan. Paleozygopleura hamiltonae "squish-out" with a Glyptotomaria capillaria and another Paleozygopleura hamiltonae. Retispira leda Glyptotomaria capillaria Brachiopods: Rhipidomella penelope Athyris spiriferoides Lingula spatulata Pelecypods: Grammysioidea alveata Cypricardella bellistriata Paleoneilo emarginata & Paleoneilo filosa Pholladella radiata Modiomorpha concentrica, Cypricardella bellistrata, Nuculoidea corbuliformis, +2 unknown Unknown Pteriomorpha bivalve: Leiopteria conradi?? Pseudoaviculapecten sp. a Assorted other finds: First item is unknown,.. possibly a hyolith. Plant fragment, orthocone cephalopod, possibly Spyroceras sp.. Tornoceras uniangulare unknown Thanks for reading.
  19. Hello, I am seeking help identifying the fossil(s) in this rock. I am new to fossil collecting myself and found this on a chesapeake bay beach well known for miocene fossils in maryland. I spoke to someone that is familiar with the area and they said that it looks like it could be a Devonian fossil that got trapped in asphalt and that it is possible that it has been displaced from its original location. I am not sure if it is an imprint or a fossilized animal and I do not know how or if I should try to remove some of the surrounding rock for identification. The pattern on the side as well as the central point are of interest to me. Thank you! It is 2 1/2 by 3 1/2 centimeters
  20. Hello everyone, I found this large trilobite pygidium today which is the largest piece of trilobite I have ever found in the area, the pygidium measuring nearly 2 inches long. Judging by the trilobits I usually find I think the area is Devonian as I have trilobits I've previously found I believe are from eldregops and greenops. The problem with this site is it's imported material from somewhere in upstate new york so I'm not 100% percent sure. Though I believe it's devonian I don't know of any species with a pygidium this size personally so would anymore with more expertise help me find an ID of what species this can belong to, I'd love to know since I can't see myself coming across another one of these in the tiny area I get to look in.
  21. From the album Middle Devonian

    Modiomorpha mytiloides (Palaeoheterodont bivalve- both valves open) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Lebanon, N.Y.
  22. From the album Middle Devonian

    Gastropod Encrusted with Bryozoan Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Lebanon, N.Y.
  23. From the album Middle Devonian

    Rhipidomella penelope (Orthid brachiopods) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Lebanon, N.Y. collected 6/25/18
  24. From the album Middle Devonian

    Leiopteria conradi (Pteriomorph bivalve) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Lebanon, N.Y.
  25. From the album Lower Devonian

    Meristella sp. (Spiriferid brachiopods) Lower Devonian Kalkberg Formation Helderberg Group Interstate 88 road cut Schoharie, N.Y.
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