Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'dinosaur teeth'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholom√§, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 36 results

  1. Kem Kem Sauropod tooth- Diplodocid indet ?

    Both of the Kem Kem sauropod teeth I have are Titanosaurid teeth so I am looking for a Diplodocid tooth. While checking out the auction site that shall not be named, I saw this tooth. It looked quite a bit different than the teeth I have and quite a bit different than the other teeth on the auction site. It has a very peg like shape to it and lacks the tip does not have that wear pattern I have seen on the Titanosaur teeth. I could be wrong but the enamel looks different too. My initial thought is that this is a tooth from the Diplodocid indet present in the Kem Kem. These are the only pictures the seller had and I am not really buying so I do not want to ask for more. This is more educational for down the road when I buy one. Any thoughts ?
  2. I have this evening and tomorrow to get up a bit more of the dinosaur collection before it is back to sharks. We have programs starting soon so my focus will be well away from dinos for a few months probably. Prepare to be underwhelmed lol I thought we would be heavy on the Moroccan dinosaurs because they are so abundant. Surprisingly, we are pretty light on African dinosaurs. I found a path to getting us deeper into North American animals. It is a bonus that an area we will need to fill is the most abundant and affordable. The dinosaur program will have a different scientific concept behind than sharks. The best state science standard we can hit for 1st-3rd graders is geology so some of the dinosaur program will focus on the formations in goelogical terms. I am looking forward to learning more about the paleoecology of this region and talking about how we can get clues about the habitats from the rocks. It is an interesting collection of animals to learn about. We have a "raptor" tooth from Kem Kem. You know, one of those "raptors". Is it Deltradromodeus or is it an abelisaur? The question can not be answered so we are presenting it as it is, a Theropd indet from North Africa. No need to go much further. It presents a great opportunity to discuss with the kids how difficult it is to describe dinosaur species. We know it is a Theropd tooth and it was carnivorous. We know there are several different dinosaurs it could be but we can not say for sure. I can not tell if my sauropod tooth is a Rebbachisaurus or not but i know you can ID them. I also know there is another sauropod in Kem Kem. If we were presenting tomorrow, it would be Rebbachisaurus. They are one cool looking dinosaur. With some more education, i will be able to tell. Either way, this tooth is the only sauropod fossil we have so this becomes the first dinosaur we really can really expand on. These teeth are inexpensive and this is the only sauropod we are likely to have fossils for. The long-neck dinosaurs are the biggest land animals ever and kids know them so we will be adding more teeth to bulk up the presentation. I have yet to pick up Spinosaur teeth but they are next on the list. I am still learning about Spinosaur teeth and have been cautious. We want to make sure we get some of the inexpensive teeth for the kids to handle and a nice example for the presentation. Carcharodontosaurus is one we will add but not until I have studied them better. There is a wide range of prices and quality. Pic 1- Theropod indet, Kem Kem. Pic 2- Sauropod indet, Kem Kem.
  3. Having bought fossils for years, I noticed that fossils are photographed or measured in a way that might exaggerate their sizes. Such methods include: 1 - Pinching their fingers or creasing their palms to create a small rise for the fossil 2 - Zooming in specifically on the fossil (Good to show details, but not good for size judging) 3 - Using a small hand, e.g. a child or woman's hand 4 - Giving a "by the curve" measurement instead of the straight line. E.g. a 4-incher tooth is in fact 3-inch if measured on the straight line As an example, here's a juvenile Rex tooth: Looks pretty big eh? Here's the real size: It's a hair under an inch long! I've been at the receiving end of this myself where a tooth I mistakenly assumed to be decently sized turned out to be pathetically small. To sum it up. if purchasing fossil teeth online in the future, ask specifically for the straight line measurement, or better yet ask for a photo next to a ruler. That's the only way to be fully informed about your purchase. Good luck, and happy buying!
  4. Back in November of last year, my son and I decided to start our own education non-profit. We wanted to combine his artwork, my teaching skills, and real fossils to create a museum on wheels that takes fun field trips to the classrooms. We had shark teeth and marine mammal fossils so we started building education programs around those. I am very satisfied where those two programs are at though I would love to expand the number of shark species we can present but that is a story for a different day. We knew we would need to get a dinosaur program going at some point but I know nothing about dinosaur fossils so I did not want to start collecting yet. My plan was to wait until late spring or early summer to start building our collection. A friend gave us two hadrosaur teeth and a Hypselosaurus egg shell piece in December so our program got started earlier than planned. As we do with every decision, my son and I talked about picking up a few bargain dinosaur fossils while we tightened up the other programs which are debuting in March. One of the first things I did was join TFF. I was very intimidated by dinosaur fossils and I hoped this place would help me educate myself. I have been a quiet observer so far and have not engaged very much with the dinosaur experts here. I have read a lot of posts and this has been so incredibly helpful. Utilizing the expertise of the members here has also saved me money and stopped me from making one unwise purchase. I have only picked up a few dinosaur items up to this point but without being on this site, I doubt I would have made any attempt at starting this particular collection so soon. I am very grateful for the forum and its members because a lot of people really want to help. I quickly learned that our presentation will be centered on the Hell Creek fauna and we can augment it with some African dinosaurs. After a bit of window shopping, it became apparent right away that Jurassic period dinosaurs were simply too expensive for us. There is no way we will be able to purchase any and trades are unlikely as we just do not have much material that would have much trade value. I can live with this though. If we focus on the T-rex/Ceratopsian fauna of Hell Creek we are giving kids species they know plus introducing them to new species which I am totally cool with. We also decided we could talk Triassic dinosaurs with kids using Bull Canyon fossils. Now I am an avid reader here so I am aware that there is some debate about the species that are found in Bull Canyon and how things are labeled by dealers but I did pick some up because we want to teach kids about the evolution of dinosaurs and to give them a few species that have never heard of. I can not be sure if the teeth I have are Coelophysis teeth but we are still going to present them as such to the students because it is an opportunity to get to early dinosaurs. Same goes for a "prosauropod" tooth we purchased. We are not going to sell the fossils so the correct ID is less important to us than being able to at least have a representation of early dinosaurs for the kiddos. Our early efforts were given a huge boost when a member here helped broker a transaction between another member which resulted in us having a very nice partial T-rex and a Nano. This was huge for us. We got the centerpiece species and it was super affordable. I am still in a bit of shock to be honest and incredibly grateful. We also picked up some inexpensive Hell Creek Triceratops teeth. I found a nice Saurornitholestes from Judith River which gives us a "raptor" fossil for the kids. I got an inexpensive Moroccan sauropod tooth which gives us a "long neck" that we can use. It is really not a bad start in my eyes. We picked some species that we really wanted to include. We also have begun to find some teeth that kids can handle in the form of partial or shed Ceratopsian teeth and inexpensive Spinosaurus teeth from Morocco. I only made one questionable decision. I did not use TFF and ended up misidentifying a tooth. This led us to having two Richardoesstesia gilmorei teeth. We really did not need two fossils from this species but it was a learning experience. I learned that I need keep studying, learning and using the forum. Had I put it here first, instead of testing my own skills, I would not have picked it up . I would have filled another need in the program. Lesson learned and the upside is that I do have a dinosaur fossil I can possibly trade. It is not much for trade I am sure, but maybe I can use it to get a fossil that fills a hole in the program. The most important thing I have learned so far is that I really enjoy collecting dinosaur fossils. I am hooked. I was never a dinosaur kid myself. I preferred sharks and whales but I am really captivated by dinosaurs now. I have been cramming my brain with scientific information about dinosaurs and my son is really enjoying getting a start on his dino artwork. We have a long way to go before we are ready to unleash our budding dino education program. I have a long way to go with my own knowledge too. I do know it will be a lot of fun to learn and I am looking forward to getting more interactive with the dinosaur collectors here. We have settled on the next round of dinosaurs to add (Acheroraptor, Ankylosaur, Pachycephalosaurus, a Troodontid, plus more Ceratopsian material) and they seem attainable so I am excited to get to work on those in the near future. I also learned there are species from the Hell Creek formation that are awesome but we will never have due to price or rarity lol Dakotaraptor is #1 on that list but the avian dinosaurs are not far behind. All things considered, I am super happy with our tiny dinosaur collection and I am really enjoying the hunt for more !!
  5. Fast. Intelligent. Deadly. The "Raptor" is perhaps one of the most famous dinosaur today thanks to Jurassic Park. To many people's surprise however, raptors are heavily feathered and nimbler than movies would have you believe. The Jurassic Park Velociraptor was merely the size of coyote in real life! In fact, their proper family name is 'Dromaeosaurid'. The largest species was Utahraptor, and it grew to the size of a grizzly bear! Dromaeosaurid fossils have been found all over the world. They first appeared during the Cretaceous, though isolated teeth have been found in the mid-Jurassic. Allow me to present my humble collection of Dromaeosaurid teeth. First up, from Cloverly Formation, one of my pride and joy from @hxmendoza A dromaeosaurid from Aguja Formation. I am seeing more Aguja fossils showing up, but dromaeosaurid teeth are still rare. Now, for the dromaeosaurids from the famous Hell Creek Formation. Some of them probably lived alongside T. rex. A big shout-out for @Troodon for getting me started on dromaeosaurids with this very first Acheroraptor!
  6. Hi all hope your all well. If anyone is willing to trade any rare dino teeth then please message me on here or pm me if preferred. Thank you Liam
  7. Hi all, I have moved images of my collection to this page. Please any questions I will endeavour to answer one by one. Thank you for viewing. Kind Regards. Liam
  8. Dinosaur teeth

    Hey guys, my birthday (Sept. 8) is coming up and I would love to get my first (or 5!) dinosaur tooth. Can y'all PM me some sites for affordable and quality dino teeth? Thanks
  9. I recently bought a Spinosaurus tooth from a fossil shop on the Rocky Moutains. I noticed this little ridge on both sides of the tooth. I looked at some pictures on the internet and im inclined to beileve that its from the premaxilla. Supposedly the teeth from the premaxilla are pointed with sharp edges on both sides. Could this tooth be one of those? Note that there is feeding wear on the tooth.
  10. European e-shop with fossils?

    Hello. I am fossils collector from Greece and i bought fossils from American websites, but the last month the customs requires very much money from me for customs clearance. I want to learn European websites, so i don't pay for customs.
  11. Ceratopsian tooth from Montana

    I bought this ceratopsian tooth. Is from Northwest Montana (two medicine formation) and is 0.8" in size. Species is unidentified.
  12. Tarbosaurus Tooth?

    Saw this tooth online recently, it already sold but it was listed as a Tarbosaurus Tooth but it reminds me more of a carcharodontosaurus tooth but then again I am unsure nor familiar with tarbosaurus teeth, what do you guys think? I have included all photos in the listing.
  13. Teeth attached to this rock? Help?

    WEITD ROCK FOUND HERE IN WESTERN NM. resembles a bunch of teeth? you guys are the coolest. dino skin?
  14. Looks like we have a number of new members who are interested in Dinosaur teeth so I thought this topic might be good for them and serves as a reminder for more experienced collectors. Let me start off the discussion by saying that identifying isolated dinosaur teeth is a challenge even for more experience collectors, so its not a trivial task. There is no one cookbook that has all the answers, just a number of technical papers and articles that provide some information on different localities or species. Many of teeth that are sold online carry identifications that dealers have historically ascribed to them but in too many cases these names are not accurate or are out of date. This is very common not only from Morocco but also North America, Europe and Asia. New discoveries can change the playing field very quickly and sellers may not be not quick to keep abreast of these changes. So let me recommend the following 1) Purchase/Trade for quality teeth, the better the preservation the higher chance you have in getting an accurate ID. Teeth missing a significant portion of serrations on one or both edges, or very worn herbivore teeth can be very difficult to properly diagnose. Avoid buying: worn, cheap or incomplete teeth, save your money on better Q ones, exception being extremely rare teeth. 2) Do not trust any identification you see on a tooth. I don't care if its from a trusted dealer, a dealer you've done business with before, a friend, a member of this forum or any auction site. You need to be the expert. 3) Educated yourself as much as possible, read papers, books or informational topics on this forum. Ask questions and post your interest here on the forum B4 you buy or trade. 4) Photos: Other than the obvious ID's you cannot look at the front and back of a theropod tooth to determine what it is, especially Triassic and Jurassic material. At a minimum photos needed are from both sides, base and closeup of the serrations. If a someone is not interested in providing you these photos, move on and purchase/trade from someone else. 5) Additional characteristics may be required and that will be dependent on what you are buying. These include serration density at the midline of both carinae, width and length of the base and how far the mesial carina extends to the base. Again if someone is not willing to provide you this information just move on. 6) Provenance is very important in trying to get an accurate ID. Teeth from North American require the following information at a minimum: Geologic Formation, State/Province, and in the US needs to include County. The county provides you a check and balance to verify that the formation provided is good. Locality information that only includes a state or province like Alberta or Montana is not adequate to identify teeth. Getting complete information from other Geographic locations can be problematic so try to obtain as much as possible. 7) Avoid restored teeth unless it minimal or done on super rare teeth. Repairs are acceptable that includes crack fill or reattachment of broken teeth.. 8) More often that not you will not be able to identify down to a species name so its acceptable to have your tooth identified to a genus or family name. examples include: Tyrannosaurid indeterminate or Daspletosaurus sp. . Be patient someday your tooth may be fully described. Here are a couple of illustrations to help understand tooth terminology if asked to provide information. From " A proposed terminology of theropod teeth (Dinosauria, Saurischia) by Hendrickx, Mateus et al (2015) "
  15. Can across this one recently on our favorite auction site, a torvosaurus tooth from colorado. Though with no intention of buying especially at the high price tag it is at I have my suspicions, the seller claims it its 100% no repairs or restoration. Looking at the pictures I highly doubt it as it looks extremely repaired to me and some of it especially in the picture zooming into the tip reminds me of the little air holes found in fake cast trilobite. Idk how much is repaired or even if the whole specimen is fake, I'd be interested to hear what you guys think. Definitely a gigantic red flag to me.
  16. Hi all, I have a group of dinosaur teeth that needs identifying. They are either triceratops or hadrosaur teeth. They come from Hell Creek Formation of Powder County, Montana. All the teeth are roughly 1.5 cm tall 1) I am guessing hadrosaur 2) I am guessing triceratops 3) I am guessing triceratops 4, 5, 6) These 3 are extremely similar. I can't tell what they are.
  17. Hi I am looking to purchase these dinosaur teeth but I am a complete novice. They are labelled as Spinosaurus Aegypiticus (I've probably spelt that wrong!) And it states they are from North Africa, which I believe is all correct aslong as they are genuine. I have attached a photo if anyone can offer advice on whether they are genuine or have been restored? Thanks
  18. Here are my Uzbekistan theropod teeth, finally got the displays for them. The tooth in the gem jar in the lower left hand corner is likely a carcharodontosaurid. The teeth in the lower right hand corner have a round base and I'm not sure what they are. However those two teeth do bear a resemblance to Shaochilong. More studying will be required for those two teeth.
  19. Thescelosaurus? Parksosaurus?

    I have here a strange little tooth. It's a little under 1/2 inch. It is from the Lance Creek formation of Wyoming. I think it could be Thescolosaurus or Parksosaurus. However I can't quite rule out a type of croc. I've never seen a tooth like this so sharp. The root is also compressed.
  20. I purchased a small tooth labeled as Dakota Raptor steini last week at the Denver show from a very well known guy from Hill City, South Dakota. The tooth is from the Hell Creek Formation, Upper Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous, in Garfield County, Montana. Is the ID correct? Is the dull part at the base from the gum line or restoration? Its about 1.5cm in length.
  21. Judith River Ceratopsian

    From the album Dinosaur Teeth

    Montana
  22. Judith River Ceratopsian

    From the album Dinosaur Teeth

    Montana
  23. Judith River Ceratopsian

    From the album Dinosaur Teeth

    Montana
  24. Today I got the opportunity to go through a lot of Chinle Formation teeth from Arizona. (Late Triassic) I picked the only I was pretty sure was a dinosaur. It is about 3/4" long. There are serration present but faint. I'm not sure if they are worn or washed in a river or something. But is this tooth agatized or what? Nice and compressed Serration, they are small and worn, but there
×