Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'dinosaurs'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • The Crimson Creek
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Bony Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 123 results

  1. Tarbosaurus Tooth?

    Saw this tooth online recently, it already sold but it was listed as a Tarbosaurus Tooth but it reminds me more of a carcharodontosaurus tooth but then again I am unsure nor familiar with tarbosaurus teeth, what do you guys think? I have included all photos in the listing.
  2. Dinosaurs ended - and originated - with a bang ? In the new paper, published today in Nature Communications, evidence is provided to match the two events – the mass extinction, called the Carnian Pluvial Episode, and the initial diversification of dinosaurs Press release http://www.bristol.ac.uk/news/2018/april/dinosaurs-ended-and-originated-with-a-bang-.html Paper https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-03996-1
  3. Another member of the forum generously helped me out with some suggestions. Just looking some final opinions before I finalize for the trip. Next week I’m going to Portugal and looking to possibly find some jurassic dinosaur material. I was thinking of going to Torres Vedras or Peniche for that. I was also told Lourinha Museum was a must see. Looking forward to that. To see footprints, I heard the saurpod track trail at Cabo Espichel is pretty cool too. Anybody have any other suggestions? Especially on where to find Jurassic dinosaur material, and the best way of getting to the places mentioned above?
  4. My collection

    Hello all, I recently saw a whole lot of collections on this forum, and they were all beautifel. Now I cleaned up my room (what's a hell of a task to me, I spended 8 hours) and I deceided to take pictures of the nicest part of my fossil and mineral collection. It's by far not as nice as most members here, but I still have decades to get a nice collection . It's a bunch of everything older then the cenozoicum, because I find it hard to choose what group of fossils I want to collect, trilobites or dinosaurs/ reptiles. Dinosaurs are pretty hard to get here without paying high import and shipping costs. So let's start then. The trilobites are the firsts. Selenopeltis longispinus. Upper: Flexicalymene ouzregui 2 X Elrathia kingi Flexicalymene ouzregui Lower: Minicryphaeus sarirus Cyphaspis agayuara Crotalocephalina gibbus Upper: Cyphaspis walteri Boeckops boecki Combination of Cyphaspis sp., a very tiny kettneraspis sp. and two phacops sp. Coltraneia oufatenensis Lower: Kettneraspis pigra Cornuproetus sp. Gerastos tuberculatus Stapeleyella inconstans Trinueleus fimbriatus Elrathia kingi Phacops latifrons Foulonia sp. Right upper corner: Phacops sp. with bite mark A whole block with partials of Stenarocalymene celebra (I don't find much about this species so I'm still not 100 % sure if this is correct) and a ventral prepped Ogygiocarella debuchi The personal high-light of my trilobites (pictures don't do it justice). A Kettneraspis williamsi with a couple of free-standing spines. Personally the best I have ever seen. So far my trilobites. Next my Khouribga fossils: Lytoloma elegans ( a bit of restoration but most is real) A roothed Mosasaurus globidens tooth. Enchodus fang (there is a jaw in the stone also) Pretty big Mosasaurus sp. tooth Two verts of Otodus obliquus. Partial Mosasaurus globidens jaw Mosasaurus sp. partial jaw. 3 Weltonia ancistrodon teeth Otodus obliquus tooth Roothed Prognathodon tooth a box with misc fossils from Khouribga My two only teeth that are not from Morocco or Europe Denversaurus schlessmani Indet. Croc from Patagonia More to follow
  5. Really enjoyed the fossil expo yesterday In Edison, NJ. Just wanted to share some of my purchases with all of you. 90% of my purchases came from an expert or directly from a paleontologist that found the fossils. The only downside is that those who deal the Moroccan stuff.. you have to be careful. I came across some phony specimens. Like mosasaur Teeth plastered onto a different species jaw, or spinosaurus claws that are mostly fabricated. In any case if you are interested in buying Moroccan fossils, I suggest talking to somebody who is an expert there, like a paleontologist, and show them a picture of the specimen or bring it directly to them to tell you if the specimen is okay or not. That’s exactly what I did, and I felt much more comfortable because I only bought material that was fool proof. At least I hope haha. Anyway they have so many options, especially for those who love minerals. Looking forward to going back. Here are some pics This first pic is of an Allosaurus bone.
  6. Turtles and Dinos?

    I am a complete and total novice, and I realize this question may be common knowledge to experts, but I figured it would still be a good place to ask. I am also a member of a tortoise forum, which is where I met Tidgy's Dad, who eventually enticed me to check out this forum too! Among the general population, it seems there is the idea that turtles (and tortoises) lived at the same time as dinosaurs and outlived them. I already know that MODERN turtles and tortoise did not coexist with dinosaurs. My question is "What animals DID coexist with the first MODERN turtles and tortoises?" Thanks! Bea/ Moozillion
  7. Anyone going to the fossil expo in Edison, New Jersey at all this weekend? It’s going to be my first time going. I wanted to know if anyone could tell me what to expect there? I’m sure it’s going to be really cool.
  8. What fossils are these?

    I recently purchased a pile of Moroccon fossils. But I can't recognize some of them, so it would be great if you guys could help me with the ID. This first one is a sphere shaped object that I can't recognize at all.
  9. Triassic Period Emergence of Dinosaurs

    Decade of fossil collecting in Africa gives new perspective on Triassic period, emergence of dinosaurs Michelle Ma, University Of Washington News, http://www.washington.edu/news/2018/03/28/decade-of-fossil-collecting-in-africa-gives-new-perspective-on-triassic-period-emergence-of-dinosaurs/ https://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2018/03/decade-fossil-collecting-africa-gives-new-perspective-triassic-period Memoir 17: Vertebrate and Climatic Evolution in the Triassic Rift Basins of Tanzania and Zambia, Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ujvp20/current Yours, Paul H.
  10. The Mesozoic is an area that is sorely lacking in my collection. I don't know why, but I just never got around to collecting in it. I never fell in love with dinosaurs or mososaurs like a lot of other people. That was until fairly recently, when I finally took it upon myself to diversify my collection and get to know better my area's (and in some ways own backyard!) geology and paleontology. I set out to discover more about Maryland's Mesozoic Park. I guess it would be best to start off from the beginning. I started the journey not knowing what I'd find, but knowing what it was I hoped to find. I wanted a piece of the hallmark of the Mesozoic, the age of reptiles - my very own Old Line State dinosaur! There was only one problem - I didn't know where to find one. I knew generally what formations to look in, but not where, nor even what to look for. So I took up the ole' Google machine and my own literature at home and started uncovering more about where to start looking. That's what lead me to the first site. A TREK INTO THE TRIASSIC It would be disingenuous to say that I did this all by myself, and I would like to thank @WhodamanHD for helping me out tremendously. Without him I likely never would have gotten this together. For those who don't know, I'll take the liberty to describe the geology of the Free State. In Maryland, the only Triassic aged rocks exposed are those of the Newark Group, here divided by the Maryland Geological Survey into two formations - the New Oxford and the Gettysburg Shale. Both units are exposed in the Culpeper Basin (centered around the town of Poolesville, Montgomery County, Maryland) and the Gettysburg Basin (centered around, in Maryland, the town of Emmitsburg, Frederick County, Maryland). After several months of searching I was never able to find a good exposure near the famous former quarries around the Seneca region in Montgomery County, which is what lead me to the area near Frederick. Here the Triassic rocks are more readily exposed, with reports of numerous fossil discoveries of dinosaur footprints, plants, fish, and others in the area near Mt. St. Mary's University and Rocky Ridge. The Gettysburg Shale in this region is the most fossiliferous, and that is the one I ended up collecting in. Thanks again to @WhodamanHD for giving me info about the site! I spent a good hour or so at the Gettysburg Shale site, my mind full of images of that amazing Grallator sp. print I'd know I'd find. Unfortunately, as the shadows started growing and the day grew colder, I was forced to give up my quest without any dinosaur specimens from this unit. Still, it was nice to finally be able to collect in it and get to experience these amazing rocks up close and personal. The vast majority of the finds from this site were simple trace fossils of I assume to be annelid worms, these being most common in the glossy looking shale.
  11. I was curious about the bare snouts I see on art/restorations of dromaeosaurs (and maybe other feathered non-avian theropods, but I mostly associate it with dromaeosaurs) and tried to do a bit of Googling on the topic, but I've found conflicting reports on whether or not there's strong evidence for it and not much in the way of actual specimens/papers that relate to it. I thought I'd throw the question out here, as I'm sure some of you have thoughts and/or sources on the subject! (Related: if at least some of them did have bare snouts, do we think they would have been covered in scales or bare skin?)
  12. https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/science/2018/03/15/study-dinosaurs-built-different-types-nests-their-eggs-depending-whether-they-lived-hot-cooler-clima/428858002/
  13. theropodaexpeditions.com

    I found this website that has some fantastic photos of dinosaur bones. Definitely worth a look. Great for reference. http://www.theropodaexpeditions.com/ Some examples
  14. Why are these black

    I have numerous size rocks that are pure black, that I found this past weekend. Since I found them when the creek was low and they were grouped together I thought I found something!
  15. until
    Dr. Mark Norell, Macaulay Curator of Paleontology, Chairman Division of Paleontology, American Museum of Natural History Unearth how technological innovation, the advancement of paleobiology and an adventurous spirit to excavate in new locations around the globe have led to an explosion of new dinosaur knowledge in this century. Find out about the latest research from one of the premiere paleontology labs in the world, including the evolution of the bird brain, the color of dinosaurs and what animals that have been long dead can tell us about the complexity of creatures living today. Members - $10 Non-members - $12 Parking - $10 (Members - $6) LINK
  16. Mesozoic of China

    kuilivoljurasschinachuanjieshaximiao36877.pdf (About 1,8 Mb)
  17. Dinosaur CSI with Joe 'PaleoJoe' Kchodl

    until
    DINOSAUR CSI PaleoJoe takes you on a trip back in time to learn about the victims and perpetrators, life and death of the prehistoric. Learn the techniques used in the investigation of how these creatures lived and died. See the evidence and discover the stories that are told through Dinosaur CSI. What diseases did they have? What color were they? How do we know so much about them? Where can they be found? Can we clone dinosaurs? This is an illustrated presentation by Joe ‘PaleoJoe’ Kchodl, Paleontologist, from Midland, MI, in the Gateway Auditorium, 3556 Lake Shore Rd., Blasdell, NY. $5/person, FREE for members. Registration not needed. PaleoJoe recently returned from a dinosaur dig to tell tales of fossil hunting in the famous Morrison Formation of Utah.
  18. Utahs top Paleontologist Jim Kirkland posted this chart on the dinosaur fauna in his state. Pretty amazing diversity
  19. Dinosaur Remains of Scotland

    Scotland has a lot to offer including good Scotch but when it comes to dinosaurs it's close to the bottom of that scotch barrel. The attached article reviews the meager and extremely rare middle Jurassic remains that exist. The Isle of Skye is the only place that have produced these remains. http://www.mdpi.com/2076-3263/8/2/53/htm
  20. Hi all, I just wanted to let everyone interested in eastern North American dinosaurs know that my paper reviewing and analyzing Appalachian dinosaur faunas was published as Brownstein (2018). The full citation and doi are below. Brownstein, CD. 2018. The biogeography and ecology of the Cretaceous non-avian dinosaurs of Appalachia. Palaeontologia Electronica 21.1.5A: 1-56. All the best, Chase
  21. Kornei, Katherine, 2018, Signatures of Dinosaur Poop Found in Cretaceous Coal Seams. EOS Earth and Space News, vol. 99, no. 1, p. 5. https://eos.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Jan-18_magazine.pdf https://eos.org/current-issues https://eos.org/articles/signatures-of-dinosaur-poop-found-in-cretaceous-coal-seams Doughty, C.E., 2017. Herbivores increase the global availability of nutrients over millions of years. Nature ecology & evolution, 1(12), pp. 1820-1827. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-017-0341-1 Yours, Paul H.
  22. Dinosaurs too successful

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-42945820
  23. Detail of the show logistics can be found in the following topic Dealers are slowly getting into town and its a madhouse looking at the dealers setting up. The show officially starts Thursday but some are already open in the Ramada and Tucson Hotel that I visited today. Here are some pictures. Tucson Hotel City Center -
  24. The Utah Natural History museum held their annual DinoFest this weekend so I was able to get some great pictures of the new skeleton of Teratophoneus, 80% complete. The skull Here are some close ups of Teratophoneus teeth Now for the foot claws!
  25. until
    First-time guests welcome! Membership fees are $18.50/year (Jan-Dec). Children under 12 come free! LECTURE: “NORTH, SOUTH, EAST AND WEST: UNRAVELING THE TRAVELS OF HORNED DINOSAURS.” Dr. Andrew Farke-Augustyn Family Curator and Director of Research and Collections, Raymond Alf Museum of Paleontology at the Webb Schools. TIME & PLACE: Unless otherwise noted, Society meetings begin at 1:30 PM. The Society meets in Classroom 4 at the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum in Los Angeles. Parking is available for Members behind the museum by means of a current Member parking pass. ABOUT US: The Southern California Paleontological Society, founded January 5, 1960, is a non-profit organization which pledges itself to work in cooperation with scientific institutions and for the preservation of the fossil record. Participation is invited in the program to collect, preserve, and study paleontological material. Find out more about us at www.socalpaleo.com or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/socalpaleo.
×