Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'diplodocus'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 20 results

  1. Singapore is a small country and we lack a dedicated fossil museum here. Thankfully, we do have the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum which hosts several impressive dinosaur skeletons and has a small section for fossils. The museum can be found at the Kent Ridge Campus of the National University of Singapore in case anyone is thinking of visiting it when my country finally reopens. Interestingly, this museum is built around 3 Diplodocidae dinosaurs, so you'll see plenty of their pictures as I showcase the place Exterior of the museum The entry is at the right The very first fossils you will spot upon entering This is the middle of the musuem. All the exhibits are built around these 3 skeletons
  2. Hey folks, thought I would share what I have been working on all week in my WorkFromHome Office/Lab. (Well, when I am not doing computer stuff). While the Tate (my employer) is closed we have been sent home to work. I brought a few fossils home to work on. The past two weeks I prepped a bunch of Lance Fm micros. I might show them off, but they are so tough to photograph well. This is this week's (and next) project... a Diplodocus skull from the Morrison Formation at the famous Como Bluff in southern Wyoming. We found this tucked into a group of tail bones. It might be from the same animal, it might not. There are a lot of other things in this quarry... typical for the Morrison. But we are calling it Dip because the tail bones are diplos. We will see when I get it all prepped and I go out and learn the difference. The left maxilla is on the right side. The other maxilla is underneath it. "How do you know?", you ask. We already cleaned up the other side. This is the bottom of the jacket. There are loose teeth all over the place in this jacket. Other bones are emerging on the left side of the jacket, and are not yet Ided. This stuff is very delicate and some bones are less than 1mm thick. Yikes. For those taking notes, I am using a variety of pinvices with pokey ends, and a MicroJack #3. All done under the microscope. And lots of Vinac, and a wee bit of superglue. Eventually everything will get sandblasted at about 5 psi with bicarb and holes will be filled with epoxy putty. I will post more next Friday.... Y'all stay safe and have a good weekend. (Edit... I was just thumbing through the post about fossils through the macro lens and took Tim's advice: I downloaded Photoscape and put a copyright into the photo. It was really easy. )
  3. Dinosaurs in Yuba City

    We hit the road today and took our dinosaur fossils to Yuba City. We did two dinosaur programs for the second grade classes at Franklin Elementary. The kids had fantastic knowledge, asked tons of questions and were well behaved. Carter and I had a really great time and I think the kiddos did too. Thankful for the opportunity to reach new kids !! It was also our first chance to use the large Diplodocus bone and our Anzu claw. Here are some of the students checking out a big Diplodocus fossil while getting their fossils to take home
  4. Quick guide to help identify a few Sauropod teeth from the Morrison Formation. Corrections and additional info always appreciated Please Note: Variations in the morphology of these teeth can vary significantly do to, species, jaw position and ontogenetic changes. This is just a high level guide. Camarasaurus: - Crown is wider than the root - Anterior Teeth are spoon-like and symmetrical, mid and posterior teeth are asymmetrical - The crown enamel ends sharply where the root begins - Wear facet, if present, can be on both sides of the tip From my collection 14.5 cm long and 7 cm long Jaw mechanics showing wear facets Brachiosaurus - Crown are only slightly wider or equal to their root - Teeth are intermediate between spoon-like and peg-like depending on jaw position - The crowns typically have an axial twist relative to the root - Crowns are Conical and Chisel-Shaped - Wear facet, if present, is sharp and at the tip but almost always pointed - The crown enamel blends into the root area. Not has sharp of a cutoff as Camarasaurus From my collection 9.5 cm long From the collection of @hxmendoza from a previous post Jaw mechanics showing wear faceting Diplodocus - Peg-like teeth long and narrow - Slightly curved teeth - Crown enamel blends slightly into the root Jaw Mechanics of Diplodocus showing wear faceting From Supplier, Paleo Gallery Apatosaurus Dont have much published on teeth but from examining ones in my collection they appear to be faceted, grooved toward the base some more than others with sharper edges. More compressed than Diplo. Provided by hxmendoza on a previous post, he made similar comments From Paleo Gallery you can see the faceting References 1) Tooth Replacement of Euhelopus zdanskyi (Dinosauria: Sauropoda) and the Evolution of Titanosaurian Tooth Morphology, Sept 2014 Salakka, Seela 2) Jaw mechanics in sauropod dinosaurs, Jan 1994 Jorge Calvo 3)The dentition of a well-preserved specimen of Camarasaurus sp .: implications for function, tooth replacement, soft part reconstruction, and food intake. NOV 2016 Kayleigh Wiersma P. Martin Sander @Masp hope this helps
  5. Dippy on Tour

    Hi all Dippy the diplodocus is now at Cardiff Museum. I think 11 casts were made by Andrew Carnegie and one went to the NHM London in 1905. It’s now on a tour of the U.K. Nick
  6. Diplodocus toe bone?

    To recap from my last post, I work for a large traveling animatronic dinosaur show. I handle our display of real fossils. Recently, the company's management purchased a number of real fossils that came to me without proper identification. However, most of the fossils we had previously also lacked proper identification in regards to where they were found, and I'm beginning to question all of our labels. Everyone involved in their original acquisition either can't recall where many of our pieces came from, or are now deceased. I'm hoping to try to verify or re-identify every major fossil in our collection one piece at a time This is a piece that was already in the collection when I joined. Its described as a Diplodocus toe bone, from one of the rear feet. There might not be enough here to confirm or rule out that description, but I appreciate any insight that anyone can give me. I have a vague recollection of being told it came from Colorado, but I'm not sure if I was actually told that, or if I just presumed that it came from the Morrison formation. More images: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=153AkHCZOrFkccnZ44ZTI_q8-i8SczWlI
  7. Wanted: Sauropod Teeth

    Hi All, I am looking for sauropod teeth. Madagascan teeth at the top of my list but am interested in all sauropods. I would be interested in Rabbachisaurus teeth but they would need to be in exceptional condition. I have a lot of teeth I would be willing to trade, too many to list. If you have something you would like to trade please let me know and what type of tooth you would be looking for in return. Thank you, Randy
  8. Fossils on Wheels can officially say we are an elementary assembly program We will be doing two presentations for all of the students at Nord Country Day School. it is a small charter in the middle of farm country here. I personally love the single class presentations because they allow you to interact with the students in a more in-depth manner. The assembly style programs are our best way to travel to schools outside of city though. We can educate an entire school versus 30-35 students at a time. This is pilot program but it is very important to our future to develop a large scale traveling fossil program. Things are moving very quickly for us and we are starting to reach large numbers of students. A big leap forward for us and a chance to bring real fossils to an entire school. This will also be the debut for our Diplodocus fossil which is our largest piece. I am really excited to bring Dippy to a presentation.
  9. It is with a good bit of giddy enthusiasm that we share our very first Jurassic dinosaur fossils. We have a start to our Morrison Formation collection and I am so excited to take these into class. This is also a proud moment because my son and I earned these fossils with our hard work. This is a gift to our program from us and a gift to the kids we want to educate. They are also big hunks of dino bone. We needed a couple of larger bones for these programs for visual flair and these fit the bill for our budget. It will be a week before they arrive but I am too excited to wait lol One of the things we learned from our first dinosaur program was that 2nd graders learn about Diplodocus when they study dinosaurs. It was a species they knew. So we purchased a partial Diplo coracoid bone. It is a 15" x 11" x 9" hunk of dinosaur bone that weighs 12 lbs. Our largest and heaviest fossil. This one will really get the attention of the kids I think and gives us a the opportunity to feature Diplo in the program We also added two partial Camarasaurus ribs that fused together during fossilization. It is 14" x 9" so it is good sized and is a great example of the geological process they are learning about. This gives us an additional Sauropod to cover in the program and lest us talk more about niches. This will be a great fossil for the kids to touch as well. We are also adding a few pounds of chunkasaurus bones. Perfect dino fossils for hands on exploration and a few special give away dino bones too. The pictures are not great, not sure why but I will upload more when they arrive. Here are the big ones.... Picture 1- Diplo coracoid Picture 2 Cam ribs
  10. Hello my name is Tijn. I love Dinosaurs and am already building a decent collection. I already have most species from the Hell Creek Formation, Lance Formation and Judith River Formation. I am mainly interested in species from the Jurassic, triassic or early cretaceous. I've got a couple Dinosaur fossils and shark teeth im willing to trade. I am not looking for anything big but small partial Bones and teeth are fine! Who can help me out? P.S. ill make some pictures of the material i am willing to trade later. Thanks in advance Tijn
  11. psittacosaurus

    Any idea where i could acquire a psittacosaurus skeleton?
  12. Diplodocid (?Apatosaurus) sp.

    From the album My Collection

    Diplodocid (?Apatosaurus) sp. Morrison Formation Upper Jurassic Moffat County, Colorado Size: 6.5 cm
  13. On Sunday I took a trip to the Natural History Museum in London. I queued up before it opened at 10am and even before then there was a long queue. I have not visited this museum since I was a child and spent an entire day there (10am to 4.30pm - a long time). I was surprised as it is a lot bigger than I remembered and there was so much to see. This place has the most wonderful things and is an incredible place to learn. The museum showcases a Baryonyx, Sophie the Stegosaurus (the world's most complete Stegosaurus) and more! The moving Trex and Deinonychus are also really realistic in the way they move. If you like your dinosaur teeth, the Megalosaurus and Daspletosaurus teeth are out of this world! There is something for everyone in this museum and I would highly recommend that you visit here if you have not already! A lot of the dinosaur specimens are casts taken from other museums but they are still cool to look at. I had taken the photos on my SLR and due to the size of the photos I had to reduce the quality of them to be able to post on the forum which is unfortunate but it's the only way otherwise the photos would take a really long time to load. There are more non-dinosaur related photos that I will be posting at some point later on but may take me some time to pick out. Enjoy the photos from this section of the museum! Blue Zone Dinosaurs (has a mix of some photos of crocs too)
  14. Youngest Diplodocus Ever Found!

    Fossil of young long-necked dinosaur found—and nicknamed Andrew I thought this was interesting.
  15. https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/baby-diplodocus-skull-1.4855910 Paper: Woodruff, D.C. et al. (2018) "The Smallest Diplodocid Skull Reveals Cranial Ontogeny and Growth-Related Dietary Changes in the Largest Dinosaurs." Scientific Reports V. 8, Article number: 14341 [LINK]
  16. I apologize ahead of time. I do not have location of origin or any history on this piece. A friend of mine acquired this when he bought a store that was closing. Other than the pictures, all I can tell you is it weighs about 12 pounds. I was thinking a vert from a Diplodocus or a Camarasaurus. Any input would greatly be appreciated. Thank you everyone!
  17. Spent a nice Sunday afternoon with Mrs Rico and Dippy the Diplodocus. For more than a century the much-loved 23-metre long dinosaur skeleton has held centre stage at the Natural History Museum London, but now it is on a nationwide tour . The genus Diplodocus was first described in 1878 by Othniel Charles Marsh. The fossilised skeleton from which Dippy was cast was discovered in Wyoming in 1898, and acquired by the Scottish-American industrialist Andrew Carnegie and sold to the National History Museum for £2000 . It was cast in 1902 and mounted in 1907. Dippy was replaced in NHM by a giant blue whale skeleton my forth favourite creature. Obviously a legend like Dippy is hard to replaced. I have also add some beautiful old photos of Dippy in London.
  18. The people's dinosaur'

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-42993354
  19. Diplodocus Coracoid?

    Heyo, I was about to purchase this but figured I should just check in here to be sure. Seller lists this as a partial Diplodocus Coracoid Found in Morrison Formation If better pics are needed the seller can provide them... Thanks, TheSpeedingCarno
  20. Some extra free gifts I just received from my latest acquisition. I am pretty certain they are sauropod teeth but I am not 100% sure about their species though, they are both Moroccan specimens: This one looks like a Rebbachiasaurus tooth but could be wrong…. Now, this is the one I am having trouble ID'ing. The peg-like shape looks like it's a tooth from a Diplodocus, but my understanding is that it's a Jurassic sauropod and not a Moroccan fauna. So I am at a lost here…. Any dino teeth expertise is greatly appreciated! Thx
×