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Found 41 results

  1. I just finished prepping my first large Diplo and wanted some input and suggestions from the community. I did it with pin vices and magnifying headset.
  2. Knightia or Diplomystus?

    I bought this prepare your own fossil fish either knightia or diplomystus so I could prepare something for the first time which is why it looks like this don’t judge. I was wondering two things actually, one is it a knightia or diplo? And two are all green river fish this hard? I know I didn’t do a good prep job but was the fish poorly preserved as well? It was paper thin in some places and the fish doesn’t look whole it looks like its bones got moved after it died. Oh it’s also about 3 inches from the mouth to the “end” of the tail
  3. Yesterday’s finds

    Here’s a preview of what I found yesterday. I went to Wyoming for fossil trip, courtesy of fishdig.com. more pictures coming when I get home.
  4. Diplomystus prep

    Hi all, I recently acquired this large Diplomystus fish from holdinghistory, not cleaned any of this materiel before so it’s been a bit of a steep learning curve, still lots to do but Im enjoying cleaning this. Thanks for looking Regards Neil.
  5. Hello Everyone, Newbie here from the Emerald Isle. I finally pulled the trigger and purchased my first fossil—a Green River Diplomystus dentatus with Knightia eocaena. The seller is well-known and highly regarded on this forum so I’m not necessarily concerned with the authenticity, but I am really keen to hear people’s opinions on this specimen. My apologies if this is the wrong place to post. Thanks, Robert
  6. Green River fish - what do we have here?

    I got this fish with some others in a trade deal the other day; I was supposed to get a mixed box of Diplomystus and Knightia, but this guy stood out for me. Doesn't look like either, and seems a bit too big for Amphiplaga. Maybe juvenile Mioplosus? Anybody? Is there another photo that can help? Thanks for looking!
  7. Fish paintings

    I'm working on some new fossil fish paintings and thought I'd share them here. I'm trying to work my way through the Green River formation fish first, though I'm sure I won't paint them all. I've only done two so far, but I'll add more as I paint them. The quality will vary, I'm sure. Here's my take on a Priscacara. and of course a Knightia: I've started on a diplomystus, and will post that soon. Thanks for looking. Oh, for those interested, I'm using gouache paints, similar to watercolor but more opaque.
  8. Green River formation Sumi e

    Basically, I put a bunch of fossil fish together in one piece . All fish that I have found at the Green River formation in Wyoming. There's a Phareodus, a bunch of Diplomystus, and Knightia. Jared
  9. Fossil Drawing Video

    Sumi e fossil Drawing Video I wanted to show you a video I took of myself drawing a Diplomystus dentatus with a Sumi e technique. It is about 4 minutes long.
  10. After sharing a japanese style sumi e drawing of a Phareodus testis, and getting a lot of great feedback, I decided to draw more fossils. This time I am drawing a Diplomystus dentatus. Picture of the fossil I am going off of is attached. I'll post a picture of the drawing when it's done. Working on it now. Jared
  11. Fossil Fish ID Help

    The seller labels this as a diplomystus from green river but I don't think it is. The fins look wrong to me. What do you guys think?
  12. Bought a fossil online. Wanted to know if it is real or not. I'm a new member, so ignore my lack of knowledge on these things.
  13. Hello, I was looking at one of my fossils, a Mioplosus I found in Wyoming to be exact, and I noticed some weird bumps in the rock under the jaw. I was like, "Is that a spine? It cant be." Now, the mouth of the Mioplosus was mangled, so you cant make out the jawline. After seeing what looked like a spinal chord under the mouth, I had a theory, "What if the mangled mouth is actually another fish the Mioplosus was eating when it died?" After gently scraping away some of the rock around the bumps I thought were a spinal chord, I confirmed my theory to be correct. There was another fish in the fossil. This Mioplosus was eating another fish, a Diplomystus, to be exact. What do you guys think? Two fish in one? Pictures are attached. Jared
  14. Well, I’m finally getting to dig into my truckload of fossils from my Wyoming trip with @RJB so it’s my turn to open up a prep thread. I spent a couple hours today poking around to find the perfect fish to start with. The 18” layer never disappoints. This good sized Diplomystus has 2 Knightia on top of it. I’m going to try to save both but I’m concerned that the right hand one is covering most of the Diplo’s skull. If that’s the case, the little guy will have to go! This is after about 90 minutes of scribe work.
  15. Framing a Diplomystus

    When I was out at American Fossil Quarry earlier this year digging for Green River fish, I came across this nice little Diplomystus dentatus. Except for missing part of the tail, it’s in good shape. It was on a much larger slab, so to make it easier to bring home I trimmed it to the shape you see here while I was at the quarry. I wasn’t sure what I was going to do with it, but I’ve now decided to frame it and give it as a Christmas gift. The shape didn’t lend itself to easy framing, so I decided to make sort of a shadow-box frame. I went to the local Home Depot and picked up a strip of walnut 1½ inches wide by ¼ inch thick and cut it down to be 1 inch wide. I ran it through my router table to cut a ledge along the bottom edge for the back to slip in, then cut the single long board into the four sides. I used a disk sander to put 45-degree bevels in the edges, then glued it all together, stained it, and gave it a clear-coat finish. (I don’t have photos of these initial steps). I cut the back to size from a piece of ¼ inch thick MDF board. I wanted a black background for the fish, so I cut a piece of black velvet and used spray adhesive to hold it down on the MDF. I didn’t want to glue the fish to the velvet, so I cut out an area that allowed me to epoxy the fish directly to the MDF board. I also printed a small label on my laser printer, glued it to a piece of thick mounting board, and used an X-acto knife to cut it to size. Again, I didn’t want to glue this to the velvet, so I cut out a small area for the label. I also attached a sawtooth hanger to the back of the MDF so it can be hung on a wall. I’m pretty happy with how it turned out. Here are a few pictures along the way: Original slab: Walnut frame with velvet backing applied and hole cut out to allow fish to be epoxied to MDF backing: Fish set into frame with label:
  16. Another Fish Prep

    Are y'all getting tired of GRF fish prep threads yet? Well, too bad here's another one. This Diplomystus is working its way through the rotation on the prep bench. I now have a tall bench with a standard desk height left hand return table for my prep area. The magnifying lens lamp can swivel between the 2. This allows me more flexibility to lean in over a larger piece to prep areas that are hard to reach on the higher bench. Also, this allows me more room to have multiple projects going at the same time. Next step is to build a stand for the blast cabinet on the right hand side of the bench to complete the "U" shape work area. OK, back on topic. Here's how the fishy arrived And here's the fish after 6 hours under the scribe. It has some interesting taphonomy. The Caudal fin is folded over and many of the bones are displaced making for a rather interesting specimen of advanced decay!
  17. My wife and I just got back from a week’s driving tour through Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming. We stopped in at American Fossil Quarry outside of Kemmerer, Wyoming, for a few hours to dig for Green River fish. It was a productive day, and we both bagged some nice finds. Seth, the owner of the quarry and a TFF member, wasn’t there that day, but his assistant, Nick, was very helpful in getting us started. I brought a bag full of tools which were mostly unnecessary. As Nick pointed out, all you really need is a brick hammer and a thin chisel, both of which they provide. I noted that since this was the end of the season and the chisels had undoubtedly seen hard use all summer, they had pretty blunt tips. I had brought my own set from Geo-Tools (http://www.geo-tools.com/fossil-rock-chisels/custom-thin-rock-splitting-chisels) and found the 1/16-inch chisel with a single bevel was particularly useful. My wife used the chisel they supplied and was quite successful. The floor of the quarry was covered with a fine powder of shale. We worked for 3 hours before the wind picked up and started blowing the powder around so much we decided to call it a day. Nick loaded our fossils onto a cart and took me over to a line of saws that can be used to get rid of the excess matrix and trim the specimens down to a reasonable size. After a quick tutorial I was happily working on my own trimming down all my specimens. I noted the saw was a Chicago Electric 10”, 2.5 HP tile saw like they sell at Harbor Freight: https://www.harborfreight.com/10-in-25-hp-tilebrick-saw-69275.html. But the blade was definitely much better than you can get at Harbor Freight. It was a 10” blade designed for dry cutting without the need for water. I was very impressed with the saw and wouldn’t hesitate to buy one from HF if I had enough need for it. But I’d look elsewhere for a top-quality blade. About 10 years ago we had visited the Warfield quarry across the road, and they had us digging right up against the rock wall where you could either split loose shale or extract your own shale right from the wall (which was a bit of a chore even at my then-younger age). At American Fossil Quarry, they extract the shale for you with a giant excavator and lay it out in rows of piles for you to access. Probably a lot safer than being right up against a crumbly rock wall. You don’t get the chance to record exact location and orientation of the fossils in-situ, but unless you are a professional paleontologist you won’t care. As Nick said, this is a commercial quarry, not a scientific expedition. The fun is in finding the fossils, of which we found plenty, even in the space of only 3 hours. I’d strongly encourage anyone to stop in at this quarry. The dirt road is reasonable for the family car right up to the descent at the quarry entrance. It’s then a bit of an adventure if you don’t have 4WD (which we fortunately did), but at the bottom there were even large travel trailers that had made it down safely. Be sure to mention that you are a member of The Fossil Forum and they will give you a 10% discount. Here are some photos of a few of our finds. My ID’s on them are tentative, so if anyone has any corrections, please let me know. Full collection after trimming: Mioplosus labracoides: Diplomystus dentatus: Small Diplomystus: Diplomystus needing more prep:
  18. I just got back from a week-long trip that included a stop to dig Green River fish at the American Fossil Quarry outside of Kemmerer, Wyoming. That was a successful venture and I will post a separate entry showing some of my finds once I get them unpacked. While I was there, I stopped in at the nearby Fossil Butte National Monument. In the visitor center, one of the rangers was doing a demo of prepping a Green River fish (a Diplomystus from the 18" layer they got from one of the commercial quarries). I didn't take any photos but I did ask a lot of questions. Before I share his answers, you might want to take a look at this video from the Fossil Butte National Monument website. It shows how they prep the fish using an air scribe and air abrasive. But be warned that what I learned isn't exactly the same as what is shown in the video here: https://www.nps.gov/media/video/view.htm?id=9BD712EE-1DD8-B71B-0B88EC525E86D328 The setup I saw was the same as in the video. It looked like a home-made blast cabinet with a sheet of acrylic plastic on top, held on by blue painters tape. It was connected to a good dust collector. The microscope, as in the video, looked like a Leica-Wild M8 stereomicroscope with a video camera on top and an offset binocular viewing head. This is a top-of-the-line unit that probably cost somewhere between $7,000 to $10,000 (sadly, this model microscope is no longer manufactured, but you can pick them up on the used market if you have enough money). The microscope seemed to be fixed in the center of the blast cabinet, you move the specimen around under it. I didn't learn the make of the air scribe tool he was using, he said it was a specially modified one with a large rubber sheath that reduced the vibration transmitted to his hands. For the air abrasive, they had two Crystal Mark Swam Blasters model EV-2. One of them, set off to the side and not being used, was labeled "Dolomite." I asked him what abrasive he was using and he said iron powder. I was surprised because I thought that would be much too hard on these fossils, but as I watched on the screen it did a great job of removing the matrix without damaging the fossil. I probed some more and he said that while the machine could be set to go up to 80 psi, he had it set to 13.3 psi. There is also a setting for powder flow that can be set between 1 and 10. He had it set to 6, and when he is doing delicate work on the fins, turns it down to 2 or 3. He also said the nozzle was specially modified to be smaller in diameter. I was pretty impressed with the quality of his work and am inspired to make my own blast cabinet similar to theirs (but without the high-priced microscope). I thought everyone might like to know what works for this facility even though it's different from what is usually recommended here on this forum.
  19. Another Green River Prep

    Here’s another torture prep. This is a little Diplomystus from the ultra hard bottom cap. This one is a bit harder to prep because there’s actually very little matrix on the fossil. So, it’s much easier to accidentally go through it with the scribe. I’m alternating between scribe and abrasive on this one.
  20. FIRST DIPLOMYSTUS PREP

    Hi all, it's my first green river fossil fish prep, i think head preped out ok, but before I start with the rest, since there are some very experience Green river preparators here, I would appreciate any tips how to preserve soft tissue parts (between ribs i.e.)!? Thank you in advance! Hope to save as much soft tissue as possible, like in example below (not sure if any colour enhancements though?). Downloaded this pic from fossilrealm web:
  21. Diplomystus dentatus

    From the album Green River Formation

    This is a 3 inch long Diplomystus dentatus. This is the first fossil fish I've ever owned and it holds a special place in my heart. These fish have an upturned mouth meaning they would have been surface feeders. The most notable feature of this specimen is the disarticulation of the skull area. You can see a large section of vertebrae has been completely sheared from the rest of the body. I believe this fish was scavenged by some sort of crustacean.
  22. Green River Fish

    Hey guys!! My UPS box of everything I brought back from my pay-to-dig trip in Wyoming came in today!! Here's what I ended up with fully unboxed. I brought home a bunch of half fish to work on my preparing skills before I tackle the complete ones. The last two big pieces at the end measure 24x18 approx and have 6 or 7 fish on them. I'll take more pictures of them tonight as I un(bubble)wrap them.
  23. Hello. Every once in a while I see these "juvenile Diplomystus" listed on our favorite auction site. The fins seem to match Diplomystus, but it would be great if someone with more GR knowledge than me could shed some light. The little guy is 1" long, tiny
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