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Found 23 results

  1. Albicetus oxymycterus drawing

    Here's a new paleo-reconstuction I drew since the past two days of Albicetus oxymycterus, which is a mid-Miocene raptorial physeteroid none of you have probably heard about. Special thing between this little Moby-Dick and city I live in is that although it was not discovered directly in PV, it was discovered very nearby in Santa Barbara in the same formation and sublayer that exists here which highly suggests that it also swam here 16-14 million years ago. I tried to make this as scientifically accurate as possible using the resources I had, which included the entire 2015 paper establishing the genus Albicetus. I mainly used a pre-existing sketch of Aulophyseter morricei as body reference (which the paper stated is morphologically most similar to A. oxymycterus except for dentition) and used the paper's skull reconstruction for the head. I used a Zygophyseter-like head as the paper stated that the supracranial basin of the skull does not elongate to the end of the maxilla like that of Zygophyseter and Acrophyseter, which both posses snouts as a result. For the body size, I calculated the skull-body ratio by dividing the mean and lower condylobasal length estimates to the total calculated length, which came with either a 1:4.6 or 1:4.9 ratio. (Unrelated to the drawing, the 1:4-5 ratio is based on using a body formula for Physeter and Kogia spp.. If you use the upper Livyatan melvillei /Zygophyseter varolai estimates as reference, a ratio of 1:5.9 and total length of 8.6 meters is calculated) I don't know any of the advanced formulas some of you guys probably do know about and simply used division, so my calculations might not be the most accurate ones. I also put in a diver for scale this time! EXTRAS
  2. Penn Dixie Drawing!!!

    Hello, fellow TFF-ers! With the permission of our moderators—and provided I follow a few rules and guidelines—I am pleased to offer up a drawing exclusively for the members of TFF. On behalf of Penn Dixie Fossil Park and Nature Reserve, we are collecting names and e-mails for people interested in joining the Penn Dixie e-mail newsletter. This info may be sent via personal message to me—all submissions will be governed by the Penn Dixie privacy policy, (which can be viewed HERE), and will be used exclusively and solely for the purpose of the e-mail newsletter. On May 1st, we will be drawing randomly from the submitted names and giving away five copies of Amadeus Grabau's Geology and Palaentology of Eighteen Mile Creek as reprinted by the Hamburg Natural History Society. Amazon Reviewer Thomas Buckley writes: “This book has excellent descriptions and images of all the fossil fauna you are likely to encounter at Eighteen Mile Creek, the Shore of Lake Erie, and the Penn-Dixie quarry…In addition to being excellent visually, it is also an easy read. Grabau writes in a more modern prose, not in the vernacular of the late 19th century. If you are collecting in these formations, having this book is a necessity. You will not be disappointed. Especially for the price.” Details about the book can be found HERE. The selected winners will be posted on this thread on May 1st, at which point I will only ask for mailing addresses for the purpose of shipping out your new book! Thanks, and best of luck! -Jay Wollin Lead Educator Penn Dixie Fossil Park and Nature Reserve
  3. Took to pencil one of my favorite Trilobites, that just so happens to hail from my immediate area of Western New York. Arctinurus boltoni is a Silurian Lichid Trilobite from the Rochester Shale. I found my first Arctinurus on my first visit to Caleb's Quarry Midddleport on a field trip in 1995. A very lucky find it was. My drawing was done with 2B and 4B pencils on textured paper. I have included a picture of my real Arctinurus.
  4. I have an artistic side to myself (I have an honours degree in the Arts and not science, shame) and Ive always wanted to learn to draw/ paint dinosaurs ina similar fashion to the below sketch of a Prognathodon. Anyone have any knowledge of Dino art, their favourite artists and perhaps know how to draw like this sketch by Dmitry Bogdanov?
  5. I thought today would be a good day to stay inside, relax, keep warm and draw again. A friend requested a particular Trilobite drawing. The subject this time is Trilobite Dalmanites limulurus, a Silurian bug from Middleport, NY. The graphic is more like a technical illustration than a cartoon drawing. It came out how I hoped, using textured paper, a 4B pencil, Charcoal pencil and an eraser.
  6. Hello everyone, I've had an idea for a while now to write and illustrate a guide on the fossil shark species of SC and how to find their remains. I really am not sure where I would like to begin, but my brainstorming process apparently involves a certain amount of doodling. These pages represent studies for how I might like certain parts of the guide to look, though all text will be typed in the final product. I am looking for any feedback - critique of the artwork, topics you'd like to see covered, additional information, etc., etc. enjoy! Here's a page that started for a mock-up for the specific species Hemipristis serra. I also drew a representation of Isurus desori on the bottom... A page dedicated to Carcharocles/Otodus megalodon (as I imagine him) And a portion of a simple tooth guide (not really sure how to incorporate this yet) - And thats most of what I've got so far. What do ya'll think?
  7. Hi all, Slowly the pieces are coming together for our Permian panorama. This week I tried to make my first drawing ever of a crinoid. In my first attempt, things did not go well. Think of a kindergarteners crayon sketch of a big flower, and you get the idea. Next, I spent days studying the anatomy of crinoids in the Index Fossils of North America book and the Treatiis. My second attempt was more ghoulish stick figure than crinoid, and went in the trash. Finally, in the past few days I got something closer to reality. I hope you find it amusing....
  8. Ediacaran Fauna -- or Flub?

    Hi all, well this is the second drawing Ive ever made in my life other than stick figures. I consider my last post a total failure (trilobite) so Im trying another subject material. Since the last post, Ive watched a few hours of You tube videos on how to do basic drawings, and hopefully that made a difference. This one took me on and off - about two days to do. So what do you think - Fauna or Flub?
  9. Drawing of Simolestes vorax

    Over the past few days I've been drawing up another paleo-reconstruction. After some time conflicting on which animal to draw, I settled on the rather under-celebrated pliosaur Simolestes vorax. S. vorax is a Jurassic pliosaur related to Liopleurodon, but is estimated to grow up to 10 meters in length, rivaling the size of the more famous pliosaur Kronosaurus. Heck, at one point there were even some theories that Simolestes was the owner of a gigantic lower front jaw dubbed "The NHM Symphysis", which was believed to be from a pliosaur exceeding 15 meters in length! Again, I used a Huion 1060PLUS Drawing Tablet and used Photoshop CS6. This time, drawing was a bit annoying due to constant need of omitting head details depicted on the skull I referenced. It took me a week to finish, and probably 5-6 whole hours in solid time due to the constant drawing/erasing.
  10. So I drew a paleo-reconstruction of a noteworthy but sparsely-known apex predator Temnodontosaurus eurycephalus, which was believed to be the top apex of the Early Jurassic until the rise of proto-pliosaurs like Rhomaelosaurus. Unlike its famous squid sucking sister T. platydon (metaphor, not literally), T. eurycephalus had a thick skull with deep jaws and large robust teeth suggesting a macropredatory diet and probably fed on other ichthyosaurs, plesiosaurs, and anything else that it could swallow (Also, growing lengths of over 30 feet, it probably could swallow everything other than another Temnodontosaurus) This is actually my first time finishing a paleo-reconstruction using only a pen tablet and photoshop (All my other drawings were either unfinished or done on paper). I used a Huion 1060PLUS drawing tablet and Photoshop CS6 to draw this. Took at least 3 hours to draw, and I heavily referenced the holotype skull to draw the head. Turned out pretty neat, but I don't know if I should color/shade this.
  11. T-rex illustration

    Hey everyone! Here's my latest piece of paleoart, T-rex! I used ink and watercolors. I didn't want to color it the traditional green or brown so I looked at vultures for reference. I find it difficult to believe the theory that T-rex was exclusively a scavenger but I thought the vulture colors would make it look nasty. Hope you like it and I'd love to know what you all think! -Mike
  12. Allosaurus Illustration

    Hey everyone, Here is an illustration of an Allosaurus I just finished. I used ink on Bristol board. I plan on doing many more illustrations of other prehistoric animals similar to this and I'll be sure to post those on here too. My two passions are paleontology and art and I strive to learn as much as I can about both. If you want to see some of my other work in the meantime you can visit my website www.mikeosheaart.com. Thanks for looking! -Mike
  13. Hi! After seeing some great paleo art here I thought I'll give it a go. Here's a little drawing I knocked up. Its the first drawing I did since about 6years old. Its only a rough sketch but its supposed to be an Amplectobelua symbrachiata chasing an Elrathia trilobite. I tried to make it is as anatomically correct as I could. Down to the correct number of body segments and grasper podomeres. (the spots are artistic license!)
  14. Hadrosaur Embryo

    Hey guys! This is a picture I drew of a fossil hadrosaur in its egg. I used pen to draw and Photoshop to give it some color. If anyone ever needs a paleontology illustration I'd probably do it for fun. Cheers! Lauren
  15. Meguskus' Paleoart

    Hello, I'm new to this forum and relatively new to the world of paleontology, so please don't hesitate to comment on any potential anatomical mistakes or the like. I'd love meeting other aspiring and professional paleoartists to exchange knowledge and ideas. I could also do commissions, if anyone is interested.
  16. Sneek Peek Of The Creep

    I started on the Pterosaur sketch last night. I stayed up a bit longer then i should have last night (this morning....3am), because i am sick. But when the artistic Chee has been reached you need to let it flow. Plus i can't really shut off my brain when i get that way. I decided to up the game and go bigger. This is 18"x24". I plan on drawing two or three of these guys on this sheet, so don't think this is anywhere near completion. I started by lightly sketching the skull that i had found on Google. Then i added muscles, skin and textures. Im not sure about some of it, and it may change a bit. I find it extremely liberating to be able to sketch something that is open to interpretation. I also went to the Field Museum in Chicago for inspiration last weekend, but their Pterosaur collection isn't the greatest. But it was fun anyway. It's quite creepy. Which is more of my style. And it looks a bit weird for now. So now i need to work on balancing it out. Added his eyes and some of his neck
  17. Click Me And Vote Please.

    You can read more here about why I am asking you to vote. http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/52402-help-me-help-the-forum/ Simply cast your vote for which idea or creature you would like to see me recreate in a illustration. I will be auctioning the final sketch to benefit the forum. Thanks for clicking!
  18. Ammonite Recreation

    I figured this may appeal to a wider variety of people (it doesn't look so scary). I made this guy up, so he may not be anatomically correct, but that's part of the fun! I also decided to give him some primitive "feelers", no suction cups yet. He's a cross between Nautilus and Octopus. This will also go up for auction to help the forum on Monday. I hope you guys like it. I figured all of the Ammonite hunters would want this to hang by their finds. Here's a dollar to show some scale So call me crazy, but i wasn't satisfied with this guy. So i did some touch up. I think making the hard shell bits completely separate in texture then the body was the right move. What do you guys think? I enjoy constructive criticism.
  19. We'll i put in another hour tonight and finished my first Mosasaur drawing. You can read more here on how and why this came about. http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/52402-help-me-help-the-forum/ But this is NOT my final drawing for the auction. I still want to draw what you guys vote on. But seeing as how this turned out i may auction this separately. I don't quite know though. I'd love to hear some feedback on whether or not this should be auctioned solo or be a "inclusion" with the other drawing. Edit:added link
  20. Eotyrannus Head Illustration

    Hi, Thought that I might share a little head study of Eotyrannus (T.Rex's great great great grandpa in terms of evolution) this is a small part of a lot of commissions that me and a professional paleontologist are collaborating and working on together as a team. We are especially fond of dinosaurs found on our home turf (the UK specifically the Isle Of Wight). So he wanted to see Eotyrannus recreated and this is the first illustration that I came too, there is a lack of Eotyrannus material, but I got the privilege of handling the real material that's kept safely under lock and key (thank god that I didn't drop it). (- Because there is so little of Eotyrannus found, some of this reconstruction is based on the Dilong which is a similar tyrannosaur that lived around the same time as Eotyrannus and they shared a few similarities in anatomy and possibly environment.) Anyway I hope that a few people like this little study I hope to upload more later on! - Beth
  21. Where there is Land...Once was Sea

    From the album My fossil art

    Colored Pencil

    © © Mike Menasco

  22. At teh Edge of the World...Ancients I Seek"

    From the album My fossil art

    Colored Pencil

    © © Mike Menasco

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