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Found 42 results

  1. Spiriferid brachiopod from DSR

    From the album Middle Devonian in Central New York

    Athyris spiriferoides Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Moscow Formation Windom Shale Deep Springs Road Lebanon, NY Collected 7/18/20
  2. Bellerophontid from DSR

    From the album Middle Devonian in Central New York

    Retispira leda Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Moscow Formation Windom Shale Deep Springs Road Lebanon, New York Collected 7/18/20
  3. Goniatite from DSR

    From the album Middle Devonian in Central New York

    Tornoceras uniangulare Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Moscow Formation Windom Shale Deep Springs Road Lebanon, New York Collected 7/18/20
  4. I found this a few weeks ago at DSR on the NYPS trip to madison county. Im having some trouble ID’ing it. Doesn't seem to be anything like it in Karl A. Wilson’s Field Guide to the Devonian Fossils of New York
  5. Greenops cephalon with one eye

    From the album Middle Devonian in Central New York

    Greenops barberi Windom Shale Moscow Formation Hamilton Group Middle Devonian Deep Springs Road Lebanon, New York Collected 7/18/20
  6. Well preserved greenops pygidium

    From the album Middle Devonian in Central New York

    Greenops barberi Windom Shale Moscow Formation Hamilton Group Middle Devonian Deep Springs Road Lebanon, New York Collected 7/18/20
  7. Headless greenops from DSR

    From the album Middle Devonian in Central New York

    Greenops barberi Windom Shale Moscow Formation Hamilton Group Middle Devonian Deep Springs Road Lebanon, New York Collected 7/18/20
  8. Eldredgeops cephalon from DSR

    From the album Middle Devonian in Central New York

    Eldredgeops rana Windom Shale Moscow Formation Hamilton Group Middle Devonian Deep Springs Road Lebanon, New York Collected 7/18/20
  9. Bushels of bivalves

    On this post I will be showing some of the nicer bivalves from my trip with the NYPS last weekend. Enjoy!
  10. Complete Rhinocaris with telson

    From the album Middle Devonian in Central New York

    Rhinocaris columbina with both valves and a telson. (One valve is underneath the other). Windom Shale Moscow Formation Hamilton Group Middle Devonian Deep Springs Road Lebanon, New York Collected 7/18/20
  11. Toss it?

    I'm thinking this might be a shard of bivalve shell, but I'm having a hard time placing it in the context of the possible taxa. Just wanted to post for ideas before I toss it in case it's something more notable. DSR, Windom Shale, Moscow Fm., Middle Devonian. Scale in mm.
  12. DSR Gastropod (?)

    This one has me stumped. I think it is the body whorl of a gastropod (DSR, Middle Devonian, Hamilton Group, Moscow Fm., Windom Shale). It is smashed, but the full circumference of the whorl is present, which means the aperture has to be on the left (which is consistent with the direction of the growth lines) (see arrow). If that is the case, there should be a shallow furrow or ridge in the center of the whorl running parallel with the cords and perpendicular to the growth lines if it were something like Mourlonia or even a Bellarophontacea. I see no evidence of such, not even on the crimped / folded / smashed edges above and below. One would think that with such distinct surface detail that this one would be easy... Any thoughts? The fossil is about 46 mm in length. Scale in mm. @Jeffrey P, @Fossildude19, @Darktooth, @Kane Here is outer side of the shell. Here is the shell flipped over to show the other side of the whorl. I think the broken area on the right is where the body whorl continued to the second whorl (which is missing). Here is both views side by side: Here is where I believe the aperture is located (I have prepped to the edge of the shell, and the shell ends there).
  13. Here is the final installment of my trip report to DSR (last spring with TFF group meet). These are the rest of the specimens including Gastropoda, Cephalopoda, Hyolitha, Phyllocarida, Trilobita, Ectoprocta, Plantae, etc. Scale in mm. A Palaeozygopleura encrusted with the bryozoan Leptotrypella amplectens. A close-up of Leptotrypella amplectens I am not sure what this is. I am assuming gastropod, but unlike the Bellarophontids, this one doesn't seem to have the ridge or furrow down the center. It's also quite large. And the striations look different than any I can find that are typical of the site. @Jeffrey P, @Fossildude19?
  14. These were collected at DSR during the TFF hunt last year. I am just getting around to processing the specimens. It's amazing that the diversity of bivalves I acquired was greater than the brachiopods! First, a picture of the site: Now the brachiopods (scale in mm):
  15. Hey everyone, Back again. Couldn’t resist lol. I figure I could offer up some positivity during these uncertain times. Unfortunately it’s getting pretty serious in New York State with C19 cases blowing up. Our family business is under some stresses and I had to make some difficult decisions today so this post is also a little therapy for me. I really love paleontology it allows my mind to wander away from the present! I got back out into the field again this past weekend on Saturday 3/14/20 and Sunday 3/15/20. This time of year I have very little to do other than go hiking/collecting on weekend. Summer activities aren’t here yet and collecting during those hot summer days can be rough. I’m itching to do more exploring for new locations in New York but I’m still drawn to the classics like Cole Hill. On Saturday 3/14/20 figured I’d check out the Middle Devonian Delphi Station Member of the Hamilton group in search of Dipleura. Still dreaming of an articulated specimen but I’m always happy with some nice cephalons. I took a couple field shots. They always look so nice fresh and wet haha. 2 nicer cephalons a nice inflated cephalon Some smaller cephalons Giving the pygidiums some love. One was big!! This looked interesting. Not sure what it is exactly. gastropods and bivalves!! A flattened cephalopod and I think that’s a branching bryozoan. Needs to be glued together. I didn’t get the complete specimen but I still enjoy the location. Does need some work to get into the bedrock. It’s getting tough to find places to work. Mother Nature helps out as time goes. up next is my Sunday 3/15/20 trip to DSR and I did really well!! Finally scored the Greenops I’ve been looking for! stay tuned
  16. Hello awesome people! Im finally out of hibernation . I don’t mind fossil hunting in the winter...as long as the snow isn’t deep. It’s been deep lately lol. So the winter hunts have been non existent pretty much. We finally had a good enough thaw and a warm enough weekend to make collecting possible! I went fossil collecting and fossil prospecting this past Saturday and Sunday (March 7th and 8th 2020). It was great getting back out in the field. what a sight!! The snow didn’t bother me I was happy it was well above freezing for once. South central New York tends to get more snow and it hangs around longer it seems ha. Anyway....I did a little exploring and was able to find more Eldredgeops specimens in a few different spots in the upper quarry. It seems if you want to find Eldredgeops you have to go to the upper parts of the quarry. Personally, I’ve only found 1 Eldredgeops cephalon In the bottom 2-3 meters of the quarry. Doesn’t seems to be any specific layers but more of an increased occurrence in the sequence. It would be interesting to try and track the shift in fauna to see if it correlates to a shift in lithology/environment. It’s a very noticeable thing that goniatites occur in the upper levels of the quarry as well. If I remember correct DSR has been described as having a coarsening up sequence in the literature. I bet extra analysis would support that idea. It’s a fun place to collect and get into deep thought about “how the heck did these fossils get here like this?”. It would be fun to try and collect/catalog data from DSR. It’s been a looong while since I made a detailed stratigraphic section. I always label my fossils (location+date) but maybe I need to start including elevation in the quarry....hmmm Anyway.....onto the AWESOME finds from DSR ........plus 2 small finds from a prospecting spot. scale bar used in specimen photos are all centimeter scale
  17. I had a rough work week last week with Central New York experiencing major flooding. It forced me to work the weekend and kinda ruined my fossil hunting thoughts. I only worked half a day Saturday 11/02/19 so I took advantage of what little sunlight I had. I had to be home before 5 to go to the mall with my wife to return some soccer shoes.......married life lol. With travel time I figured out I could go to DSR and get 70-80 minutes to fossil hunt! I needed this to de-stress so I went for it . I didn’t get much time but I tried to make it count. I knew I wasn’t going to be doing any major digging due to the lack of time. My plan was to try and keep working slabs I pulled from the interval I keep finding phyllocarids. When I got there I saw a large area to the left of where I worked that was ripped up with slabs around. It was the same interval and layers as the productive ones I worked 30 feet away. I wish I recorded the moment because I literally said out loud “I’m going to find a phyllocarid in these discards”.......walked 2 steps and found this in the discard pile.... here is a field shot....I was excited and terrified cause I realized I just found a Rhinocaris columbina phyllocarid with both carapaces and the telson but the telson is on the counterpart!! I thought I was going to have another fish that got away story but then I finally found the other half after an agonizing 40 minutes. Remember I didn’t have long haha. here is a field shot of the other half. Telson top left. I got a call from work and I was literally on the phone working and fossil hunting when I found the other half and silently cheered then continued my phone conversation here is a photo of the raw uncut slabs I collected from the field. I have a saw now so I’m not as concerned with reducing in the field as I used to be. Here are some photos of the finished product. This is a really exciting find because of the amazing association of both carapaces AND the telson. Really an informative specimen. It also came from the same interval I’m finding other phyllocarids. The very delicate disarticulation of the one carapace and slight spread of all the phyllocarid parts makes me very curious about the paleo setting. This is a photo of an artists recreation of a Silurian phyllocarid I found on google. This is not a Rhinocaris columbina but it does have some similarities that will help people visualize what a Rhinocaris may look like. this little something I circled had me wondering if it was possibly associated with this phyllocarid. Almost seems like a little appendage but there is really no way of knowing for sure I suppose. Interesting either way. thanks for reading! Not a whole lot just a single find that I think is really awesome . A quick little DSR trip (11/02/19) with a nice reward! Al
  18. the hunt goes on

    I like DSR. It's peaceful and quite. You get a nice little view. Over all a good spot. I have however been unsuccessful with finding an intact Dipleura! The detail that can been seen on them is fantastic. What amazing little monsters. A quick way to-be driven nuts. I know fossil hunting is a mix of: skill, knowledge, luck and time BUT gosh darn! I will keep trying. This is what I have to show for my effort so far.
  19. DSR

    I don't put much into small fragments once have learned what they are. They just go into a bucket at my house to use for practicing cleaning fossils or part for later. Maybe some sort of Frank in fossil art piece. Lol I recently went back and looked through this bucket to see if I had some bits from a fossil someone else found and needed the rest of. No luck, but I did come across this guy. I believe it is a dipleura eye. Gosh darn it trilobite fossils are so beautiful in their preservation! I can only imagine that someone found most of him, is missing the eye. A real shame. Please let me know if this is your eye.
  20. Hello forum folks I went to DSR again yesterday 10/05/19 as I had another free day to go collecting. I may not being able to fossil hunt until the end of the month so I had to take advantage! I have been noticing the phyllocarids are coming from certain intervals lower in the quarry...could be nothing....could be somthing....before I assumed I figured I should test it. I knew the exact bedding plane my last Echinocaris came from so I planned on opening a shelf on that bedding plane. My thought was if I could find another phyllocarid on that bedding plane maybe it could mean something....clearly not enough data to make any final assumptions but heck who wouldn’t dig a bedding plane that has produced lol. I was still specifically upset I couldn’t find the missing piece to my phyllocarid from last trip so I did some scanning I initially. I knew it was a waste so I got to work on the bedding plane I desired. before I got started I moved a lot of over burden and got some nice slabs moving. Loving the wedge and sledge combo....so much easier on my body physically. anyway....I found this Echinocaris punctata about 30 minutes into clearing off the shelf. Same bedding plane!!! Only about 1-2 feet from the one I found last trip. Bingo!! I’m going to show a few close ups...this is a really interesting specimen. It appears to be A double carapace folded in half. You can see the margins of the other half and some spots actually fold over slightly that confirm this. It would be great to reveal the other side but I would have a very thin, flattened, fragil specimen. also.....I’m feeling like the boy who cried wolf here but are these mandibles I see on the top left part of the specimen (Seen below)? The margins aren’t as easy to see but it’s clear there are some type or serrations on each part. Here is a close up that does a decent job showing what I’m talking about. They are really non photogenic because of the rust on the shale between the mandibles. It messes with the margins visually. It was still really messy with debris/rubble when I found it so I wasn’t sure where the counterpart was under the rubble. Foolishly it’s on a slab I left behind and I’m going to try and rush out after work to grab it this week. I found this another foot away from the phyllocarid above. When I found this I immediately thought I had a rhinocaris phyllocarid but now I’m not so sure? Unless someone can say for sure. Just doesn’t look right. here is a close up.....it has some lines running across it that make me question what this is. So for now I’m not sure. I found this Rhinocaris sitting out in the open so I have no idea what layer it came from. I’m positive this is a Rhinocaris and it’s very different from the other unknown specimen I found. Here is a reference photo for people who are unsure what phyllocarids are. I really think this specimen is special like the one I found last trip. Also, I do find it interesting that this was on the same bedding plane and very close to the last Echinocaris phyllocarid. More field work will help tell the tale. More to come....my trilobite finds from DSR and I found a layer with all Eldredgeops!!! Really awesome. Stay tuned for part 2
  21. Hey everyone! I finally had a day to go out and enjoy a Saturday fossil hunting with no time limit!! I decided to check 2 middle Devonian locations that have yielded nice dipleura specimens in the past. I’m still looking for “that one” specimen....eventually I’ll find one. I didn’t find the trilobite I tasked myself to find but I did find awesome stuff on Saturday . So here is a little trip report from Saturday September 28, 2019 plus some extra stuff I found earlier in the month. I’ll throw it in at the end. I got up really early so I could get to Cole Hill by sunrise. I had 2 sites in mind from the start. My new house is now only 30 minutes away from CHR which was a nice surprise! Early morning view I’ve had some tough outings at Cole Hill. This rock is so hard!!! I’ve tried clearing overburden just to get to more immovable rock. Anytime I get things moving I find something decent so that was the goal. Find rock that moves!! I ended up finding a spot way off the main outcrop and I got to work. I immediately found a plate with 5 cephalons!! It’s not being very photogenic so I took a picture after making them wet. the right shot shows 4 cephalons stacked in between the white scale bars....the left one shows the 5 hidden cephalon that Is under another cephalon. The bottom piece is just a cheek but could continue I’m not sure. Not very photogenic but rare to find an assemblage like that. I was able to find an area with more weathered rock and I found around a dozen cephalons!!! These are the better and bigger ones. I have a few nice juveniles but they are half covered in rock. I liked these 2 a lot. The left one is very 3D (also came in 10 pieces lol) and the right one has all the cephalon margins intact!! some nicer pygidiums I found. I found 7-10 total in various conditions. I found a lot of associated fauna as well!! The Gastropods came from mostly one bedding plane. The same spot I found the cephalon hash plate these were not far behind littered all over. I also found a bunch of bivalves! Way more than I usually do. I collected more on this trip than I have in the past. The rock kept moving and I kept finding!! After I worked the shelf back far enough I decided I wasn’t going to try and find a new spot. 4 hours of collecting and it was time to go to Deep Springs Rd. Even though I didn’t find exactly what I was after I found lots of amazing specimens compared to past trips . Kept my finder crossed that DSR would be as kind. DSR next post.....
  22. First dipleura!?

    Stop by deep Springs road quarry On my way back from work today. I was only able to be there for a short period of time because it started raining. Normally I really wouldn't care if I was getting rained on but of course with It being in the middle of nowhere and slick shale everywhere. NOPE. Thankfully I found a hotspot very quickly. Over all a good dig! I think I found a dipleura trilobite. Not sure. I saw a post from @Darktooth talk about them. It's in a strange position. All the trilobites I have found at DSR before are very small but other have found ones this big and bigger their.
  23. Deep Springs Road (first trip)

    I made my first trip out to DSR today and, with some helpful tips from some kind people on the forum, I was able to find the site and know what to look for. Its a nice little spot. Near the road, easy to get to, and quiet. I didn't find anything exceptional, but I thought I would post pics of my favorites for anyone looking up the spot. Thank you to the owners of the site for let everyone come and enjoy it.
  24. help the NOOB (DSR)

    how this today at Deep springs road quarry. I didn't make the line marks on it, it came out of the ground like that. It is small, round and dose not look like any of the other fossils I got from the site.
  25. With fall just around the corner, I was able to get in a hunting trip with my friend Jeffrey P, to the wilds of upstate NY: Specifically, the Deep Springs Road Site, in Earlville. I met up with Jeff at our usual meet up place, and time, (6:00 am at a park and ride near Jeff - about an hour away from my home.) and loaded his gear into my vehicle. Off we went. We enjoyed some very nice scenery, once the morning fog lifted. Hills, streams, farms, and wildlife. We both saw a bald eagle flying by, and some turkeys, chickens, and a deer or two. After a stop for gas and some food in Roscoe, NY, we headed up to Earlville. It was, as usual, a good ride, punctuated with some great conversation, and some interesting music. We arrived at the site around 9:50 AM. The place looked like it had be worked quite a bit, with large areas of rubble from other people's digging. The weather cooperated nicely, - it was beautiful, with temps in the low 70's, and we enjoyed sun and some cool breezes. We got to work quickly, and finds came in drips and drabs. We both made some decent finds, (pics to follow.) Jeff getting ready to start the day. We hunted until about 5 pm. With a 4.5 hour drive ahead, (for me) we got on the road. A brief stop at everyone's favorite Scottish Restaurant, and a quick stop for gas, we finished the day out with more good conversation and music. Traffic was great until after I dropped Jeff off. I spent about 25 minutes in stop and go traffic on I-84 through Southbury. I got home at around 9:45 PM. Jeff is such a great guy to hunt with. Informative, supportive, knowledgeable, and often quite funny. I always enjoy hunting trips with him. Thanks again for another great trip, Jeff. Please feel free to add your finds here, Jeff. Hope you enjoyed the report and finds. Until next time, Kind regards,
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