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Found 12 results

  1. Eusphenopteris neuropteroides 2.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Eusphenopteris neuropteroides Fern Eastern Kentucky Pennsylvanian Period (~ 330 million years ago) Pteridosperms or seed ferns are a group of extinct plants with mostly fern-like foliage but having real seeds. They were mostly small trees but other forms that exhibited climbing growth have been found. Some forms, notably those called the Medullosales as seen here had large fronds which could be up several meters long. Several groups can be distinguished within the Pteridosperms. The Pteridosperms evolved in the latest Devonian, and became common in the Carboniferous. The Medullosales took over the leading role during the Westphalian and persisted into the Permian. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Cycadophyta Class: Cycadopsida Order: †Medullosales Family: †Medullosaceae Genus: †Eusphenopteris Species: †neuropteroides
  2. Mariopteris ferns?

    Hello! I received these two pieces as a nice gift! I WANT to say Mariopteris - I think definitely in photo #1 - but photo #2, while I WANT to say Mariopteris, I am leaning a bit toward Eusphenopteris!
  3. Sigillaria Tree Fossil a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sigillaria Tree Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Sigillaria is a genus of extinct, spore-bearing, arborescent (tree-like) plants. It was a lycopodiophyte, and is related to the lycopsids, or club-mosses, but even more closely to quillworts, as was its associate Lepidodendron. This genus is known in the fossil records from the Late Carboniferous period but dwindled to extinction in the early Permian period (age range: from 383.7 to 254.0 million years ago). Fossils are found in United States, Canada, China, Korea, Tanzania and Zimbabwe. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Sigillariaceae Genus: †Sigillaria
  4. Sigillaria Tree Fossil a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sigillaria Tree Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Sigillaria is a genus of extinct, spore-bearing, arborescent (tree-like) plants. It was a lycopodiophyte, and is related to the lycopsids, or club-mosses, but even more closely to quillworts, as was its associate Lepidodendron. This genus is known in the fossil records from the Late Carboniferous period but dwindled to extinction in the early Permian period (age range: from 383.7 to 254.0 million years ago). Fossils are found in United States, Canada, China, Korea, Tanzania and Zimbabwe. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Sigillariaceae Genus: †Sigillaria
  5. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lepidodendron Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Lepidodendron — also known as scale tree — is an extinct genus of primitive, vascular, arborescent (tree-like) plant related to the lycopsids (club mosses). They were part of the coal forest flora. They sometimes reached heights of over 30 metres (100 ft), and the trunks were often over 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. They thrived during the Carboniferous Period (about 359.2 ± 2.5 Mya (million years ago) to about 299.0 ± 0.8 Mya) before going extinct. Sometimes erroneously called "giant club mosses", they were actually more closely related to today's quillworts than to modern club mosses. The name Lepidodendron comes from the Greek lepido, scale, and dendron, tree. By the Mesozoic era, the giant lycopsids had died out and were replaced by conifers as well as smaller Quillworts. This may have been the result of competition from the emerging woody gymnosperms. Lepidodendron is one of the more common plant fossils found in Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) age rocks. They are closely related to other extinct Lycopsid genera, Sigillaria and Lepidendropsis. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Lepidodendraceae Genus: †Lepidodendron
  6. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lepidodendron Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Lepidodendron — also known as scale tree — is an extinct genus of primitive, vascular, arborescent (tree-like) plant related to the lycopsids (club mosses). They were part of the coal forest flora. They sometimes reached heights of over 30 metres (100 ft), and the trunks were often over 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. They thrived during the Carboniferous Period (about 359.2 ± 2.5 Mya (million years ago) to about 299.0 ± 0.8 Mya) before going extinct. Sometimes erroneously called "giant club mosses", they were actually more closely related to today's quillworts than to modern club mosses. The name Lepidodendron comes from the Greek lepido, scale, and dendron, tree. By the Mesozoic era, the giant lycopsids had died out and were replaced by conifers as well as smaller Quillworts. This may have been the result of competition from the emerging woody gymnosperms. Lepidodendron is one of the more common plant fossils found in Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) age rocks. They are closely related to other extinct Lycopsid genera, Sigillaria and Lepidendropsis. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Lepidodendraceae Genus: †Lepidodendron
  7. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lepidodendron Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Lepidodendron — also known as scale tree — is an extinct genus of primitive, vascular, arborescent (tree-like) plant related to the lycopsids (club mosses). They were part of the coal forest flora. They sometimes reached heights of over 30 metres (100 ft), and the trunks were often over 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. They thrived during the Carboniferous Period (about 359.2 ± 2.5 Mya (million years ago) to about 299.0 ± 0.8 Mya) before going extinct. Sometimes erroneously called "giant club mosses", they were actually more closely related to today's quillworts than to modern club mosses. The name Lepidodendron comes from the Greek lepido, scale, and dendron, tree. By the Mesozoic era, the giant lycopsids had died out and were replaced by conifers as well as smaller Quillworts. This may have been the result of competition from the emerging woody gymnosperms. Lepidodendron is one of the more common plant fossils found in Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) age rocks. They are closely related to other extinct Lycopsid genera, Sigillaria and Lepidendropsis. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Lepidodendraceae Genus: †Lepidodendron
  8. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lepidodendron Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Lepidodendron — also known as scale tree — is an extinct genus of primitive, vascular, arborescent (tree-like) plant related to the lycopsids (club mosses). They were part of the coal forest flora. They sometimes reached heights of over 30 metres (100 ft), and the trunks were often over 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. They thrived during the Carboniferous Period (about 359.2 ± 2.5 Mya (million years ago) to about 299.0 ± 0.8 Mya) before going extinct. Sometimes erroneously called "giant club mosses", they were actually more closely related to today's quillworts than to modern club mosses. The name Lepidodendron comes from the Greek lepido, scale, and dendron, tree. By the Mesozoic era, the giant lycopsids had died out and were replaced by conifers as well as smaller Quillworts. This may have been the result of competition from the emerging woody gymnosperms. Lepidodendron is one of the more common plant fossils found in Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) age rocks. They are closely related to other extinct Lycopsid genera, Sigillaria and Lepidendropsis. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Lepidodendraceae Genus: †Lepidodendron
  9. 3-D CALAMITES a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamite Tree Fossil SITE LOCATION: eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (330 million years ago) Data: Calamites is a genus of extinct arborescent (tree-like) horsetails to which the modern horsetails (genus Equisetum) are closely related. Unlike their herbaceous modern cousins, these plants were medium-sized trees, growing to heights of more than 30 meters (100 feet). They were components of the understories of coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. The trunks of Calamites had a distinctive segmented, bamboo-like appearance and vertical ribbing. The branches, leaves and cones were all borne in whorls. The leaves were needle-shaped, with up to 25 per whorl. Their trunks produced secondary xylem, meaning they were made of wood. The vascular cambium of Calamites was unifacial, producing secondary xylem towards the stem center, but not secondary phloem. The stems of modern horsetails are typically hollow or contain numerous elongated air-filled sacs. Calamites was similar in that its trunk and stems were hollow, like wooden tubes. When these trunks buckled and broke, they could fill with sediment. This is the reason pith casts of the inside of Calamites stems are so common as fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  10. 3-D CALAMITES a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamite Tree Fossil SITE LOCATION: eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (330 million years ago) Data: Calamites is a genus of extinct arborescent (tree-like) horsetails to which the modern horsetails (genus Equisetum) are closely related. Unlike their herbaceous modern cousins, these plants were medium-sized trees, growing to heights of more than 30 meters (100 feet). They were components of the understories of coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. The trunks of Calamites had a distinctive segmented, bamboo-like appearance and vertical ribbing. The branches, leaves and cones were all borne in whorls. The leaves were needle-shaped, with up to 25 per whorl. Their trunks produced secondary xylem, meaning they were made of wood. The vascular cambium of Calamites was unifacial, producing secondary xylem towards the stem center, but not secondary phloem. The stems of modern horsetails are typically hollow or contain numerous elongated air-filled sacs. Calamites was similar in that its trunk and stems were hollow, like wooden tubes. When these trunks buckled and broke, they could fill with sediment. This is the reason pith casts of the inside of Calamites stems are so common as fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  11. The seashell fossils I usually find in the driveway gravel (not local) are brachiopods, but this one is larger (almost 3cm long), seems more oblong, and the umbo(?) is more curled. Based on the image results, I'm leaning toward bivalve, but I'm not confident about it. The humidity is fogging up my lens, preventing me from taking the photos outside. Please bear with the quality. (EDIT: Better pics in post #8.)
  12. While we've had gravel brought in since, there's a small patch of gravel near the garage that was already here before we moved here 13-ish years ago that never really caught my eye. I checked it out yesterday and, to my surprise, I actually found more than what I typically do while looking through the gravel in my much larger driveway in a day. I found this first, which resembles a cluster of miniature Cheerios. There's actually a lot of this in that patch. Coral instantly came to mind, but I can't find any pictures that look quite like it. After I took the picture, I noticed a small disc with radiating lines to the left that I'm not sure if it's a crinoid columnal (it looks like it might have a dot in the center) or a section through coral/bryozoan. Piece measures about 3cm wide. Then I found this that I thought was really cool. It appears to me to be a crinoid stalk. Piece measures about 3cm tall. Here are a couple of brachiopods that I also found in that patch if it helps ID the age (I assume Mississippian) and/or formation that they came from:
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