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Found 186 results

  1. Day Two ; Locality One (or Six if you include Day One) Black Sahara, South of Erfoud 20th February 2019 Well this is where things really get interesting, so stick with this thread as there are dozens of photos of fossils coming up. Looks at the tags if you want clues. I was up bright and early and wandered out at about 7 am to watch the sun rise over the still mighty Erg Chebbi dunes. And as night's candles were burnt out and jocund day stood tiptoe over the misty duney tops, the chaps came to join me and managed lots of photos. Here's one, if you would like to see more, I'm busy posting a kazillion of 'em under the Nature Photography thread.
  2. I found this Phlycticrioceras trinodosum heteromorph specimen in June of 2018 whilst hunting the middle/upper Coniacian Atco formation. It is the largest fragment of this species that I am aware of, having a whorl height of 51 mm as opposed to 47 mm of the largest fragment I've seen published. This genus is a bigger, rarer, and (mostly) younger cousin of Allocrioceras. I sent pictures of it to Keith Minor and he pointed out that there was also an echinoid sticking out of the specimen, something which I had totally missed! With much of the echinoid still stuck in the living chamber it is hard to get a definitive ID. But because it has such a shallow anterior ambulacra, which gives the anterior end a more smooth rather than definitive heart shape, he ruled out both Mecaster texanus and batensis. He suggested Micraster since the site has a strong European component in both the bivalve and ammonite faunas, and because the periproct side has the right shape. From finding other, although not as well preserved specimens that show similar morphology he appears to be right. I have yet to confirm this ID with Andrew Smith, but either way I think the piece is worth showing. And reading this thread got me thinking about how this could have happened and what effect it could have had on the echinoid's preservation. My thought is that because irregular echinoids lived and today still live most of their lives burrowing in the sediment it is unlikely that it would have crawled into the living chamber, but instead that it was blown into it post-mortem via currents that had dredged it out of the sediment. I already know that this site was a high energy environment from my other finds here so this seems the most likely possibility to me. But because of the fact there is still at least one spine still attached to the specimen it could not have been swept up from the sediment too long after death or all of its hairlike spines would have blown away. I do, however, find it interesting that it is positioned anterior first with its posterior towards the aperture, the position I would expect to see it in if it had indeed crawled into the shell. The specimen is also the best preserved echinoid from this site so far. Despite the ammonites being generally well preserved and not too crushed, most of the echinoids that I have from the site are terribly crushed, flakey, and often infested with rotting pyrite. I think being encapsulated in the chamber very much reduced those effects. Even though the ammonite and the echinoid are a bit crushed, the echinoid would have probably been worse off otherwise. The heteromorph fragment length is 70 mm and the whorl breadth, being a bit crushed, is 13 mm. I would think that this specimen, with its open planispiral coiling, would would have been at least over a foot in diameter when complete. It is the robust (female) morph of the species with a rib index of 5½. For comparison in Fig. 1 I pictured it with my most complete P. trinodosum specimen. From the part of the echinoid that is exposed I can measure 25 mm in length, 25 in width, and a thickness of 8 mm. I have also found abundant yet scattered fish remains at the site, so perhaps one day an ammonite-fish will come my way. But until then, anyone else got ammonite-echinoids to show? Fig. 1. Fig. 2.
  3. Large echinoid

    I found this echinoid fossil a few months ago. It is about 10cm long, I have only ever found two of these. It was found on a rocky beach in Abu Dhabi, UAE
  4. Odd Texas oyster

    I'll post a full story in trips when I get time, but I was searching around a new spot, being unsure of the formation (Austin I assume now) I was picking up everything I found including oysters which I would normally leave, I assume they're exogyra or ilymatogyra but the Mark on the back is strange to me, 2 of the three I picked up had them and I haven't seen anything like it in pictures. Species and out formation ID would be nice
  5. Nucleolites Scutatus - Les Roches noires

    From the album Best of 2018 finds - a year in review

    Nucleolites Scutatus an echinoid from Les Roches noires (oxfordian)
  6. Yankeetown, FL Echinoid Hunting!

    Hey guys! Here's something a little different from me... Echinoid Hunting! This was an extremely fun and productive fossil hunt, finding some of the oldest fossils Florida has to offer. In this video you even get a tour of my fossil-filled vehicle, which could have been a whole video in itself hahaha! You may also notice a quality change. We got some sweet new gear! Give the video a watch if you're interested and have some time!
  7. Macraster side view

    Post prep, heart urchin, Macraster sp., from Duck Creek formation, long side view.
  8. Macraster sp

    Post-prep, heart urchin, Macraster sp., from Duck Creek formation in north Texas.
  9. From the album Best of 2018 finds - a year in review

    A set of different urshins (Micraster decipiens and Echinocorys Gravesi) from chalk cliffs of Normandy. Saint pierre en Port and Senneville sur Fécamp (Seine Maritine) - France - Cretaceous
  10. Cidaridae spine - Les Vaches Noires

    From the album Best of 2018 finds - a year in review

    A Cidaridae spine from "les Vaches Noires" cliffs' oxfordian ooltih.
  11. Orthopsis miliaris 3.JPG

    From the album Campanian/Maastrichtian echinoids from SE Pyrenees

    Apical disc. Madrepores in G2 plate are clearly visible
  12. Me again here guys. Well, I just stepped on this fossil on that auction website and it caught my attention because of the round shape of the rock. As a newbie that seemed weird to me.... Would an echinoid fossil have this round aspect (Third pic speaks for what I mean)? (I don't know if I'm clear on what I'm meanbut somehow it seems fake to me...) Can anyone give more information on how to detect the fakes? Thanks in advance
  13. Here is an echinoid I collected several years ago while sifting in Post Oak Creek in Sherman Texas. I haven't ever seen another one come from there. Anyone have an idea on the identity of it. The grid paper is in mm so this echinoid is approximately 10x10 millimeters in size.
  14. During my organization and cleanup process in my never ending abyss of the fossil garage, I came across these gorgeous calcified fossils which are both cretaceous. I kind of misplaced them for a little while... I found them both at a sand pit in Coastal North Carolina a few years ago. So, show us your splendid, dandy and awesome calcified cretaceous fossils PLEASE! I shall start first on this cool lil' prospect to see what may be shared by other members. Libby First pic is a Flemingostrea subspatulata, Cretaceous oyster. Pee Dee Formation, North Carolina. Second pic is a Hardouinia kellumi, Cretaceous echinoid. Pee Dee Formation, North Carolina.
  15. Sea Urchin

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Boletechinus sp. Late Cretaceous Mount Laurel Formation C and D Canal, Reedy Point North Delaware City, Delaware, USA
  16. Sea Urchin

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Hemiaster delawarensis Late Cretaceous Mount Laurel Formation C and D Canal, Reedy Point North Delaware City, Delaware, USA
  17. https://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-news-from-elsewhere-46513790
  18. echinoid morphology

    BeadleCLASSIndispensablechinoi-1995-Evolution.pdf Steven C.Beadle Retrodisplacement of the oral and anal openings of dendrasterid sand dollars Evolution,49(6),1995,pp 1203-1214 edit: apologies/size,1,3 Mb approximately second edit:"1005" changed to "1995"
  19. There is a spot in the Peace, not far upstream of the Canoe Outpost, that yields relatively large quantities of the sand dollar shown in the photo below. I have these 2 relatively good examples and 3 more partials stuck together in a block. All are of nearly identical size. I had assumed Miocene based on the source, but the the publication from UF on "Pliocene and Pleistocene Echinoids" has the only sand dollars coming close. The closest matching in shape is Encope michelini, but the sample is twice the size of my examples. Anyone have experience with these?
  20. I've received papers recommended by forum members and I'm looking to identify or verify the ID's for a number of pieces still confusing me. In the Santa Fe river, while sifting limestone rubble, we find numerous examples of what previous posts on TFF identify as Rhyncholampas goldii (or the molds thereof) an Oligocene sea biscuit from the Suwannee Limestone. On much less frequent occasions we come across the molds of the sea urchin in the photo below. I'm having difficulty determining whether these are Gagaria mossomi or Phymotaxis mansfieldi. I'm leaning toward P mansfieldi, because the the regularity of the test. Can anyone help?
  21. Hipster Macraster

    When I saw the beard on this echinoid, the name stuck. Duck Creek or Fort Worth fm, North Texas. I don’t find them often with such a luxuriant plumage of spines, so I’m reluctant to prep further for fear of knocking off the fuzz.
  22. Fossil Sand Dollar

    From the album OBX

    Echinoid (Sand dollar) Pleistocene Found washed ashore at Avon Pier, Hatteras Island, North Carolina
  23. Echinolampas sp.

    From the album Fossil Collection

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