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Found 45 results

  1. Hello everyone. It's been a while since I posted a trip report, but I thought I would share my finds from yesterday. The rivers here in eastern North Carolina have been at un-collectible levels for the most part since last September when Hurricane Florence paid us a visit. Well, looking at the levels on the Tar for the last week or so, I saw a golden opportunity to hit the Tar right as the river dropped to a collectible level. And hopefully be the first one there! I had the day off and a fossil Buddy took a half day off of work. We hit a total of about 15 locations, all Rushmere member of the Pliocene Yorktown Formation. The first couple of spots we stopped at were a disappointment. Much of the upper cliff had slumped off and covered the fossil layers. But then things picked up. Here are the amazing finds! Great whites, I found the smaller of these two. My buddy found the larger. It is exactly 3 inches. Mine is a measly 2 1/4. Mine both sides after cleaning A mako I found, kind of beat up but the largest I have found from this area. more to come .................
  2. rapp creek hunting

    Beautiful day, lots of spring peeper frogs everywhere. Creek looked like it had been extensively worked while I have been away. Broken shells and torn down banks showed the local kids(?) have been busy. Everything greening up, yet not a lot of mosquitoes, water levels dropping. Hunting was mediocre, found four ecphorae in other people's tailings, none perfect (one encrusted with barnicles, not shown). Lots of small teeth (but no cow shark or angel shark teeth), some skate pieces, a few broken drum teeth, a nice fin Tilly bone. With Spring turkey season coming up soon, I'll be staying away from the creek for a while, trying the beaches instead.
  3. Hop 5 03/30/19

    1. Hemipristis serra: One of my first teeth of the day, found in the water. Small, but nice colors and perfect serrations. 2. Carcharias cuspidata: Flawless sand tiger. Symmetrical and super sharp, with both double cusplets intact. 3. Galeocerdo aduncus: Gorgeous tiger, almost looks like a G. cuvier because of size. Very nice root to crown contrast. 4. Odontocete tooth: Little porpoise/dolphin tooth with a long, thick root. In very good condition. 5. Ecphora sp.: A very nice small Ecphora, nearly complete, just missing the white part at the top. Rare to find more than a fragment of these at Brownies. Cast your votes! The poll will end in three days, on April 4th at 3:00 p. m. EST. Hoppe hunting!
  4. rapp creek hunting

    My hip is bothering me, but we've had beautiful weather the last few days so I had to get out. Ended up being a short trip. Most of what I found was broken and small and about half as many teeth as usual, but I tried. Tape is in cm. A three inch ecphora, but missing a tail. Two or three skate stinger pieces. A nice but hard to scan cowshark upper, and pieces, some fin tilly bones, a few angel shark and drum. Lots of animal tracks along the creek but no frogs, crawfish or salamanders, just scud shrimp.
  5. Ecphora Snail

    From the album Virginia Miocene

    Ecphora sp. Miocene Choptank Formation Virginia
  6. Exploring the Virginia Miocene

    Spent a cold, soggy day on a private trip along the Potomac yesterday. The mud was so saturated that we were sinking up to our knees where the sand met the mud at the base of the cliffs. It was totally worth it! Came home with treasures untold until I finish unpacking. I know there are some really nice whale vertebrae in there, including the one below. There are also a couple nice Ephora snails and what looks like maybe an echinoid -- really rare for the area if it is! My daughter found a couple snaggletooth shark teeth that are actually iridescent and blew me away! Here's a video report of the trip: Sorry I can't say specifically where this is. They are having problems with uninvited guests already.
  7. rapp creek hunting

    Hoping to get out before the weather turned colder, headed to the freshwater creek; the water was still high and extremely cold. I was surprised when I reached "my" cowhark teeth spot to discover that someone have shoveled deep into the creek bank leaving a gaping hole; not sure if they hauled the sand, dirt and gravel away or if they just dumped in in the creek to separate stuff in the abundant flowing water. I scratched around anyway and found stuff (like always) but no cowshark and no big teeth, only a few angel shark teeth and drum teeth. There were lots of small broken ecphora laying around in the creekbed; found one nicer one though missing it's tail-tip. A few small coral clumps, an interesting oblong vert, and tiny teeth, many with cusps. I became tired of sifting with no striking rewards, so I picked up some shells which I usually avoid (they often don't survive the trip home); will post on the ID section since I'm curious what they are. Guess I''l have to find some new spots.
  8. Cleaning Ecphora

    I've had this hanging around the house for a while, and thought I'd see if there's some suggestions for getting the limestone/ coral and barnacle growth off this rather large Ecphora (about 5 inches). Read about water with vinegar or bleach, but that sounds way too harsh. Thanks.
  9. Calvert Cliffs 2018

    So i dont post all the time anymore but as we approach the end of the year i always like to organize my finds and do a calendar. Well here are my finds for 2018 not a bad year and a found my benedini which is the rarest of the rare for Calvert. If anybody is interested in a calendar let me know i'm all done except for December still trying to find a couple more good finds! Hope everybody had a great 2018 and here is to an awesome 2019!!!!
  10. Matoaka Beach 11/07/18

    Hi all, I finally made the trek to Matoaka Beach, a fossil collecting site along the Calvert Cliffs on the Western Shore of the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland. The beach is accessible to the public for $5 per person per day. Once we arrived, we reported to the front office where the property owner and his adorable newborn daughter were happy to collect our fee and give us access to the beach along with advice on how to best hunt the grounds. He advised us to head North (left of the entrance), which was what I had also read online. Apparently, the farther North you head, the better the fossils tend to be. So my dad and I made our way down the stairs to the foot of the cliffs, and began searching. The beach is very wide, so it's difficult to decide where to walk. I was finding fragments of Chesapectan shells left and right, but nothing quite worth keeping. But then, after maybe 5 minutes of hunting, I looked down at my feet and saw a large, complete, Ecphora staring back at me. I could hardly believe it. At a site where invertebrates dominate the matrix, a nice Ecphora is just about equivalent to finding a Megalodon tooth. And yes, I am aware that Meg teeth can be and have been found at this site before, but the find that I was after that day was certainly Ecphora. It was a gorgeous specimen, much larger and more complete than any other I'd found before. And there it was, just laying out in the open, a couple hundred yards from the entrance. I excitedly showed my dad the find, and promptly continued hunting, although I knew there was likely no beating what I had just found at the very beginning of the day. As I walked farther North, I marveled at the cliffs, which were absolutely chalk full of invertebrate fossils. It was incredible, and unlike anything I'd ever seen before. I kept finding crushed shells and small pieces of fossilized coral, but nothing spectacular. That is, until I stumbled upon the section of the beach where many huge chunks of the cliffs had fallen. I decided to look for large shells sticking out of the cliff falls, and very quickly discovered the best method for finding fossils at Matoaka. Immediately, I began finding giant Chesapectan every couple of inches in the cliff falls. After unearthing about a dozen, I decided to head North again to see if I could find another similar section. I walked at least a mile farther and found next to nothing, so I turned around and headed back towards the digging site. When I arrived, I saw that my dad has discovered the falls and was digging through them just as I had been. We both set down our gear and decided to spend the rest of our day there carefully excavating shells from the matrix. This was certainly different than the fossil hunting I've done in the past. It felt more like the traditional "dig site" hunting that most people think of when they think of a paleontologist or archaeologist. It was really cool. At one point, I saw a familiar spiral structure just poking out of one of the falls, and quickly recognized it as a small Ecphora. I plopped myself down on the ground next to it and spent the next 20 or so minutes cautiously excavating it. I foolishly forgot to bring a digging kit, so I resourcefully used broken fragments of sturdy shells around me to dig out the specimen. Although I chipped off a few pieces of it, I managed to extract it from the matrix mostly intact. With that, we headed back towards the entrance. We decided to sift for a bit to try for some shark teeth, and eventually I found one and my dad found three. Matoaka is unrivaled for invertebrate fossils along the Cliffs, but it's definitely not a top spot for teeth. Overall, I was incredibly pleased with my first trip to Matoaka Beach. From the friendly owners to the beautiful scenery and wildlife and the fantastic fossil finds, Matoaka Beach is a must for any fossil hunter in the DMV area. We ended up finding a ton of Chesapectan, ranging from "itty bitty" nearly the size of my hand, some stunning Ecphora, fossilized coral and barnacles, some Turritella, and a few shark teeth as well. I already can't wait to go back to Matoaka. Thanks for reading my report. Hoppe Hunting!
  11. Ecphora Study

    Ecphora Study
  12. rapp creek hunting

    Made a final trip into the woods prior to opening of deer season here. Don't think they'll bother me if I avoid disturbing their game a few days before hunts. We had a lot of rain and shells and bits were everywhere in the creek. Surprising that I didn't spot much in the creek bed, but screening yielded the usual small stuff I find (eight angel shark teeth and a bunch of drum teeth-- tried to stand then flip over--, pieces unfortunately of two cow shark teeth, lots of sand tiger shark spikes, tiny teeth). Nothing big. Picked up an almost intact ecphora, bigger busted ones washed out everywhere along with with scallops (Chesapectins) and frilly oysters. I don't usually mess with shells. Beach has been horrible lately (wrong wind), but may be my only hunting for the next week. Maybe time to go fishing!
  13. Ecphora Snail

    From the album Calvert Cliffs

    Ecphora, probably E.megane, but I'll say for sure when I prep it! Virginia Miocene Collected on private property with permission.
  14. Ecphora species

    Who wants to play "name that ecphora! first one up is from choptank formation I believe. I didn't take field notes cause I'm a rookie.
  15. I haven’t been keeping any Ecphoras that I find because I have all I want but this one looked like it could be pretty big. Turned out not to be very big but big enough to be interesting. It was found in a river outcrop with a little bit exposed. Normally small ones can be easily cleaned with a toothbrush and soapy water but bigger ones tend to have cracks. This one had plenty of cracks and rotten spots that made it fragile. It had to be preserved with vinac. Here are some pics during prep.
  16. Hello everyone, I apologize for the delay in making my report, but my latest trip was delayed by an upper respiratory infection. I took this past week off from work, with plans to visit both Matoaka and Flag Ponds, but then the virus hit and so goes the best laid plans of mice and fossil hunters. By Thursday, after four days of long naps and lots of fluids, I decided I was well enough to make the hour and a half drive down. I also thought that some sunshine would do me good. The day was gorgeous, not the normal, swampy heat that my home state of Maryland is known for. We call it, 'the air that you wear.' Surprisingly, the crowd was small. for such a beautiful, sunny day. I arrived at the cliffs around noon. High tide was around 9:30 that day, so while I would have preferred to go earlier, I waited for the tide to roll out a bit. The waves were a bit stronger than I expected, so I am glad that I waited. It was not a day for teeth because I found nothing other than a few tiny lemon shark teeth. But after meeting Igotarock and seeing her report, I had shells on my brain more than teeth this time. Whodaman, I was not feeling up to going all the way up the beach to the second cliff, but I have been eyeing it up for weeks. It is on my list for a cooler day or maybe a day when I can get an earlier start. The material that fell down a few weeks ago at the first run of cliffs is still revealing gems. On my way to the fall, I made the mistake of slipping on the clay ridge at the base of the cliffs. I know that area is very slippery and I try to avoid it, but I stepped up on it for a minute because the sun had dried it fairly well so I thought I was safe and I wanted to look at a very large clam shell. On my way back to the sand, my feet both went out from under me at the same time. Fortunately my bum hit the sand and not the harder clay. I banged my left wrist up a bit and it was very sore last night, but no permanent damage. After sitting for a bit and making sure there was no real damage that would keep me from going on, I made my way to the fall, found some promising chunks and put them in a bucket that I had brought along with some bubble wrap. Tonight, I got out the toothbrush and the dental pick and revealed this,
  17. From the album Calvert Cliffs

    Carefully exposed all of these with a dental pick from the lump of matrix in which they were encased. Nothing got moved, just glued insitu. top: Scaphella virginiana center left: Mariacolpus octonaria center right: Ecphora megane bottom left: arcadae indet. sp. bottom right: Glossus sp.
  18. Ecphora Snail

    Collected on the beach after a storm. This is an index fossil for the Drum Cliff member of the Choptank Formation, Shattuck Zone 18. Choptank is the dominant formation at Matoaka Beach. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  19. Ecphora Snail

    Unusual coloration. Typically these are red, sometimes with buff patches, but not usually all buff. The broken areas show the buff color to be a layer on the outside as there is red showing through the breakage. Collected from fallen cliff matrix in the bay containing index fossils of the Drum Cliff Member, Shattuck Zone 18. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History
  20. Ecphora prep

    Went out and found some Ecphora! Now, time to prep! First one: Size:1.7 inches pre-prep prediction: Not great
  21. Tiniest Ecphora Ever

    Last week on a trip to the Tar River I brought home several decent sized Ecphora quadricostata along with an assortment of other gastropods and bivalves. This was on the same trip I found the Gannet ulna. While cleaning matrix from one of the larger ecphora's today, I found this teenie tiny ecphora quadricostata. It is 13.6 mm (.53 inch) long and 11.4 mm (.45 inch) wide. Here it is in a standard 4.35 inch by 3.35 inch riker mount.
  22. rapp creek hunting

    Nice Spring outing, very green, nice balance of frogs, salamanders, nesting birds (in the creek bank?), with poison ivy growing well and more background construction/ farming noise than usual. Not much has changed in the creek bed, could use a good rain to wash out more. The tooth hunting was slow (probably because I wasn't working at it hard enough). Still, came out with a nice intact(?) ecphora, two broken cow shark teeth, four angel shark teeth and a bunch of drum teeth (or facsimiles thereof; don't usually pick them up unless pretty, but it was a slow day). Some stuff in matrix, unusual for the creek but nothing clearly exciting. The sand shark teeth were small and many broken (guess the kids in the area have been picking these). Picked up a lot of bits and pieces (a few of the smaller ones are in the photo; guessing many are turtle= my default for flat pieces that look like but are not seashells). More to sort through. Small stuff to puzzle over.
  23. I went to Brownies for the first time last Saturday. It was beautiful as the water was completely blown out by the Nor'easter storm of the day before. There were trees down everywhere along the roads near the park. I didn't find much, just a few tiny teeth because of how the water was blown out. So I went back today and was thrilled to find one shark vertebra & two other vertebrae. One looks like it is from a fish. The third is unknown to me. Do you remember the scene in Raiders of the Lost Ark, where Harrison Ford gets into the fight with the guy with the sword & he blows him away with his gun? Well that is how I felt when I came across another fossil hunter & we chatted about our finds & I showed him my shark vertebra. I was so proud until he pulls out a whale vertebra as big as my hand!! I was dying inside, but I also had to laugh because I was so busted. If he is reading this right now, I was awed by your find. I went on to find some nice teeth, shells & two tiny Ecphora.
  24. Another Nice Day on the River

    After a couple of weeks of us being under the weather from an Upper Respiratory Infection, Mrs.SA2 and I decided to take the dogs and visit one of our favorite places this past Saturday. Despite the forecast for rain, we both had a great day. But, the true measure of a successful day was achieved when the totally exhausted dogs slept the entire way home. As some of you may remember, I'm still playing catch up with Mrs.SA2 as she found 5 megalodon teeth in January. Saturday, I got my 2nd of 2018, about 10 mins after we started hunting. It's a gorgeous little "hubbell" meg with nice serrations and coloring. That gives us 7 megs so far in 2018. In just the few hours we were there, I found teeth from 11 different species of sharks. Here are a few of my larger ones. Mrs.SA2 had her own bag of goodies. I'll post some photos of them when she gets them cleaned up. Along with teeth, we also found a couple of those dreaded Miocene snails called Ecphora. Even more interesting, we found 2 different species of Ecphora about 10 feet from each other. I'm sure @Fossil-Hound and @sixgill pete can appreciate just how dreaded these Ecphora can be. Mrs.SA2 found 3 of them, but mine was the largest and most complete and is the oddball with only 3 whorls. Adding these 4 to her collection, Mrs.SA2 now has 59 Ecphora specimens from MD, VA and NC. The goal is to get around 100 specimens and then donate the collection for study and curation. All in all, it was a great day and Mrs.SA2 was happy. Happy wife, happy life!!!! Cheers, SA2 and Mrs.SA2
  25. So to make up for the rain yesterday i walked all day today. I went sharks tooth hunting in the morning and found a huge sand tiger and a nice posterior meg, then a buddy of mine who lives down south was nice enough to ask me if I wanted to hunt down his way. So i scrambled off the beach and headed south. Well I was lucky enough to find a bunch of my FAVORITE fossil the ecphora!!! I was also able to collect a bunch of shell for mom not to shabby!!!
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