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Found 34 results

  1. I finally finished a shadowbox display for some of my Edmontosaurus fossils. The top 2 are a proximal and distal sections of dorsal ribs. Both found a few inches apart, but are probably not the same actual rib. Bottom right is a small rib head section my son found 10 years ago. Its either a juvenile rib head or an adult cervical rib. Bottom left is an ossified tail tendon and the only complete one I've found (or even seen found). You typically only find 1" - 2" long bits and never the vertebral connection. I find it rather funny how much time was spent cleaning, repairing and prepping these to remove all the matrix, only to carefully craft a display that makes them look like they are still embedded in matrix. The "sand" background the bones are mounted in is actually the matrix these fossil came from. I collected a small amount from the quarry, then screened it before gluing it to the mount surface. The final thing I have left to do is create an informational data plaque for it.
  2. T. rex bite marks on Hadrosaur skull?

    I recently got this rather nice Edmontosaurus annectens braincase from the Lance formation. But what's interesting, it has this large hole in the top of the skull. The seller has told me that the hole is not the result of any collecting or prep damage. The seller found the piece themselves and apparently it was found upside down in the field. I've bought from this seller before and they always have high quality fossils so I'm inclined to believe the seller when they say that this hole is old damage. So then my first thought would then be, could this be a big tooth mark? Although I don't want to jump to conclusions. It's a large gash on the top of the skull. On the top there are a few pieces of bone that kinda seem like they were pushed in and on the side there are some bone fragments that seem to be kinda push out. Something pushed in from the top and then ripped out to the side maybe? I have some T.rex replica teeth and one seems to fit fairly decently. So I'm wondering, how plausible is it that this is a T. rex bite mark? We know T.rex ate Edmontosaurus of course, and we know it can crush bone. Opinions? Braincase overview. Hole closeups.
  3. Although identification of Hadrosaurid teeth in North America is very difficult or impossible some older publications by John Horner give us some information to help us with a few. The information goes back a bit so there might be some new understanding but will share what is published. If anyone has publications that can add to the dentary information of teeth from North America please feel free to post it. Horner notes that on dentary teeth all Saurolophinae teeth have diamond-shaped crown whereas Lambeosaurinae teeth are more elongate see figure 13.4. So one may not be able to assign it to a specific genus but a Subfamily may be possible. Maxillary teeth can be different but not discussed.. Saurolophinae include: Edmontosaurus, Kritosaurus, Gryposaurus, Brachylophosaurus, Maiasaura, Brachylophoslaurus Lambeosaurinae include: Lambeosaurus, Parasaurolophus, Corythosaurus, Hypacrosaurus I would suggest that only complete teeth with fairly good preservation be used in any attempt to identify these teeth. Hell Creek & Lance Formation A publication on Edmontosaurus diversity in North America by N. Campione and D. Evans 2011 concluded that all there is only one species of hadrosaur in these faunas so all teeth found can be assigned to Edmontosaurus annectens. Judith River Formation Horner identifies dentary teeth with small denticles as Gryptosaurus (However not sure its been described from JRF so I would question this assignment) Two Medicine Formation Horner identifies dentary teeth with big denticles as Gryptosaurus latidens Horner identifies dentary teeth with very small denticles as Prosaurolophus maximus The figure below shows variations with several species of dentary teeth Book: John Horner: Evidence of diphyletic origination of the Hadrosaruian in Dinosaur Systematics Approaches & Perspective Currie & Carpenter Chapter 13 Book: Dinosaurs under the Big Sky by Jack Horner 2001
  4. Latest headache

    So, this is a labor of love I am attempting (probably poorly) to rebuild. Its a caudal (tail) vert from an Edmontosaurus from the SD hell creek formation. Highly fractured when recovered, and suffering from extreme root rot. Completely missing a "V" shaped portion of the anterior portion of the centrum, probably about 1/5 of the total. Surprisingly I do have the neural spine intact, just have to replace it after I finish reconstructing and filling the centrum. Also included a pic (and my guide) for what it should look like.
  5. Last year's Hell Creek finds

    Here are some of the better finds from my digging trip in South Dakota last year. First up is what is likely an osteoderm from Ankylosaurus. This specimen is gone for research. I've got a "stupid rookie" story to go along with this if anyone is interested. Next is a section of Edmontosaurus rib with the head and part of the main. This still needs final cleaning and consolidation. I'm still debating whether to leave them separate or re-create the missing portion and join them. This is the largest and most complete ossified Edmontosaurus tail tendon I have seen. Most of the time you only find little 1 inch sections. This one is completed prep, retaining some of the matrix and a random BOB, as dug. Nice chunk of turtle shell. I have a love/hate relationship with these. This is one is large and quite thick. Most of them are extremely thin and fragile as egg shell. Still needs final prep and consolidation. Unfortunately its a covered in CA, which is making it so much harder. A very nice Tricerotops tooth that my son recovered. He is like a magnet for these large trike teeth. This is the 3rd big one he's found. All I find are tiny spitters. This is a juvenile T-Rex tooth, found beside the Ed rib. This one is gone for research. There's also a small nano-T tooth missing its tip, and a large BOB which I think could be a bit of Trike frill. No pics of those available at this moment. I'll have to add them later.
  6. Edmontosaurus jaw

    Hello! I see these edmontosaurus jaws. Edmontosaurus jaw are common? What do you think? Are they good ones or not? Thank you so much. jaw 1
  7. Hello! I see this 3 edmontosaurus claws. The seller told me that are natural and not restored. Are restored? Wich one has better quality? Thank you so much!!
  8. Hi there, i found this tooth on an European auction site and was wondering whether the ID is correct and the quality of the tooth is acceptable. Now I am considering of buying it... Unfortunately there are no better pictures available. According to the rules I have edited them to hide any hints on the auction site. The tooth is labeled as „Edmontosaurus regalis“, the origin is: „Dog Bille quarry, Lusk, Wyoming“. Thanks in advance for your help!
  9. This was on several twitter paleo pages, posted this morning by several paleontologists. Comments and photos are that of the of North Dakota Geological Survey's Paleontology protection program. 2014 article https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2014/oct/21/dakota-ducbkilled-dinosaur-home-bismarck This was the old "Dakota" exhibit. It was meant to be temporary. The arm is the piece on the bottom edge. It was previously displayed with the palm up, and this side was not well prepared and wasn't exposed before. This is indeed a portion of "Dakota" the Dinomummy, which is part of the North Dakota State Fossil Collection. We are currently working on cleaning this specimen for a new exhibit to open Feb 2020 People were confused at exactly what they were looking at here, so we've thrown together a little guide to explain how the bones of the hand relate to the fossilized soft tissue. Yes, digit III has a large 'hoof-like' nail, and much of the hand is encased in 'mitten' of skin. What this means is that the fingers could not really move independently that much, but acted more as a single unit. The tiny pink finger (digit V) is reduced and had no nail. Note: these images are "in progress" images. More work has been completed since they were taken Tail skin
  10. Hello! Over the weekend I made some new labels for my fossil collection and I was wondering what everyone thought of them. I have QR codes which link to the corresponding "prehistoric-wildlife.com" species page for more info, and I added in some basic I.D. info to the cards to not crowd them. I also attached numbers to the labels and the fossils, so that I don't need to keep the labels directly next to the fossils. Would love to know what you think, and if anyone wants more information/the template I created. Thanks! P.S. Two of my I.D.s I'm still not 100% on (deltadromeus and Pectinodon) and I don't want anyone to assume I've completely I.D.ed them. Thanks!
  11. Dinosaur Fossil Rib Bone

    Hello everyone! I found this partial rib bone for sale, labeled as a dinosaur (Triceratops or edmontosaurus) rib bone, (reconstructed by the seller). The only locality information given was that it was found in the Hell Creek Formation, and that the rusty color of this specimen comes from the Iron in the matrix. The main thing I'm wondering is if it is a dinosaur rib bone (i'd be happy with just a "Dinosaur indet" I.D.) or if its from another animal. The lack of locality information has be a little concerned, and I wanted to check with the forum to see what you thought. Thank you for your help!
  12. A Dynamite Dino Donation

    A few months ago we purchased a T-Rex tooth from TFF member @Troodon and he also gave us a super nice Nano tooth. I never got his permission to mention that sale or the gift so I get that anonymous. That is our only T-Rex material and it was also the first fossil donation to our program from a Fossil Forum member. Those teeth really helped us get started becasue it allowed us to use our small budget to fill in other parts of the dinosaur program around having T-Rex stuff. We owe him a huge thank you for that and I wanted to share this on the forum. Well we now have another gigantic THANK YOU to give Frank. I arrived home from work yesterday to find a package from him and it was beautiful dinosaur fossils and some additional non dinosaur Hell Creek material. There were some fantastic fossils in that box and he helped us really strengthen not only the Hell Creek part of dino program but also our African dinosaur section as well. I say this in most of our posts now because it is true. We could not do what we are doing without the support of The Fossil Forum and the members here. @Troodon shares his knowledge and his identification skills with everybody here and that has been invaluable to me. Our dinosaur program is heavily influenced by the knowledge I have gotten from him and bolstered by his generous donations. Thank you Troodon and all of TFF members who donate fossils, share the knowledge and offer encouragement. We really could not do this without you The box o' dinos..... Thescelosaurus fossils (toe bone, vert, two teeth), a beautiful Ceratopsian tooth from HC, an Edmontosaurus tendon, some awesome HC croc teeth, an R.isosceles tooth, a really nice Spino tooth, an abelisaurid tooth,a beautiful Titanosaur indet tooth, and a Ornithomimid toe bone (possibly a juvie Struthiomimus).
  13. I have been working hard lately on all of our programs and we are very close to having the dinosaur presentation I want us to have. We have a name for this program, Dinos Rock. Yes it is not super creative but for 2nd graders, this is a geology themed program. For 3rd graders, it is adaptation based but the name works. We have added some pieces that gives us more than a few teeth. Nothing museum quality or anything but a few bones help the visual factor. I have been studying the biology, geology and ecology of dinosaurs so the science will be good. my son is working on the art but we wont have any done soon, he has school projects a head of this. We are close to being ready a full 6 months before I thought we would be. Hell Creek was going to be a focus for us because the fossils are available and this is the fauna that most kids will recognize. If you are willing to look hard, you can also find some real bargains from this formation. We turned a lot of early attention collecting attention to Hell Creek dinosaurs and I am actually really happy with where we are at with the fossil material we have. There is a lot of room to add and maybe upgrade in the future but this is a good start. This is the famous T-Rex and Triceratops fauna and we started our collection with those critters. Very early on, we were able to get a few Hell CreekTriceratops teeth. I am very happy that through a purchase from TFF member, we added two frill pieces. They are Lance formation but we are not covering the Lance formation yet so they will be used here. I also added a frill piece from Hell Creek. The kids will get to touch the largest frill piece which is a great bonus. An iconic dinosaur and I think well represented. Also early on, we stumbled into a great bit of a luck. A TFF member saw a post of ours and passed it on to another TFF member who sold us a beautiful Tyrannosaurus Rex partial tooth and gave us a really nice Nano too. It was very affordable and a generous gift was added that gave us nice pieces from the most famous dinosaur ever. The rock star really. I was not sure we would be able to get a decent example at all but to do it right off the bat was HUGE. This would not have happened if not for the members that decided to help us out. We are extremely grateful The first dinosaur fossil we got were two Hell Creek Edmontosaurus teeth that were a gift. We acquired a nice jaw fragment in a trade. I am a bargain shopper with a limited budget so I LOVE our Edmontosaurus as it has not cost much at all. I named this display Eddie I like it so much lol Hadrosaurs are important dinosaurs to talk about and I think a fair amount of kids may not know about them. I would like to add another bone later too. They seem attainable for us. Acheroraptor was behind only T-rex on the my list and we got a really beautiful tooth and it was another bargain pick up. I will talk a lot about this species and I will get deep into the biology/ecology of this awesome dino because I love Dromaeosaurids. Raptors are also an iconic dinosaur that kids love and this is a relatively new species which is another fun thing to discuss with the kids. We will also be introducing the kids to a theropod they have never heard of, Richardoestesia gilmorei. I have told me son to envision a toothed Cormorant type dinosaur as I lean toward them being a fish eater. It is pretty cool to get a Hell Creek dino that they will not know anything about. We have yet to add a Thescelosaurus fossil but we will before we start presenting. I want to add another piece of the fauna and it seems this is the most inexpensive option we will have. It will also give the kids another dinosaur they probably do not know and it will round out the basic Hell Creek fauna. There is no shortage of dinosaurs that we can add either. An Anky or Nodosaur scute is way up on the program list of fossils for me and hopefully we can find one from this formation. Dakotaraptor is #1 on my personal list and I will get one eventually. A Troodontid is also very high on the list as well. I know eventually i will also pick up an Ornithominid too. All three of these are more expensive so we will have to save and wait but each one would also make awesome educational dinosaurs. I also really want to add an Avian fossil. I have not researched this but my guess is they are very rare. Leptoceratops is another species I would love to add at some point too. They are really cute and kids will dig them. Anyway, here are some of the fossils. I think we have a good start going to our Hell Creek collection and I am looking forward to taking these to work with me very soon. Pic 1- Triceratops teeth and Eddie Pic 2- T-Rex, Nano, and Hell's Thief. I am so happy to have these fossils. Pic 3- One of the frill pieces. This one will end up in a larger Trike display with more teeth and another frill. Plus we will have nice frill for kids to check out too.
  14. We had an awesome item show up in our mail box today, an Edmontosaurus jaw fragment. It is the product of our first trade on TFF and it is really the first dinosaur piece we have that is not a tooth. We traded an extra dinosaur tooth for it. A Hell Creek for Hell Creek swap. Thank you @Captcrunch227 for an awesome trade and for being a great trade partner. We are super happy with the process and the end result. The mail brought another pleasant surprise. Our Acheroraptor tooth arrived. It is a beautiful tooth and a great addition. As if our day was not busy enough, we secured ourselves an Ankylosaurus tooth from Judith River and it is not a nodosaur. Right tooth from the right formation. I am not saying it is a tooth from Zuul at all but it gives us a chance to tell the kiddos that it MIGHT be . I think Zuul is the perfect species to discuss armored dinos that a lot of kids will recognize but also I am super fired about it. All and all, a pretty fantastic day off from work for me lol
  15. We all know that Magnapaulia was the biggest lambeosaurine hadrosaur that ever lived, but did you know that Kritosaurus means "broken lizard" due to the original specimen being found with broken nasal bones? Did you also know that the name Charonosaurus highlights the fact that it was found near a river by paying homage to the role of Charon in ferrying souls to the underworld along the Styx River? Also note that the name Hypacrosaurus means "under the top lizard" because Barnum Brown considered Hypacrosaurus to be almost the size of T. rex.
  16. On Sunday I took a trip to the Natural History Museum in London. I queued up before it opened at 10am and even before then there was a long queue. I have not visited this museum since I was a child and spent an entire day there (10am to 4.30pm - a long time). I was surprised as it is a lot bigger than I remembered and there was so much to see. This place has the most wonderful things and is an incredible place to learn. The museum showcases a Baryonyx, Sophie the Stegosaurus (the world's most complete Stegosaurus) and more! The moving Trex and Deinonychus are also really realistic in the way they move. If you like your dinosaur teeth, the Megalosaurus and Daspletosaurus teeth are out of this world! There is something for everyone in this museum and I would highly recommend that you visit here if you have not already! A lot of the dinosaur specimens are casts taken from other museums but they are still cool to look at. I had taken the photos on my SLR and due to the size of the photos I had to reduce the quality of them to be able to post on the forum which is unfortunate but it's the only way otherwise the photos would take a really long time to load. There are more non-dinosaur related photos that I will be posting at some point later on but may take me some time to pick out. Enjoy the photos from this section of the museum! Blue Zone Dinosaurs (has a mix of some photos of crocs too)
  17. Spring 2018 Dino Trip

    Anytime you can go collecting fossils its a good time and I would like to share my spring trip to South Dakota and Montana. My South Dakota site is in the upper Hell Creek Formation and full of the hadrosaur Edmontosaurus annectens. I've been collecting this site for over 20 years and its still delivering. We are on the edge of a bluff and the fossil layer can be between 2 to 4 feet. Lots of good bones are to be found but we also have lots of punky or junk bones and about 70 % is collectible. The site is quite large and like I said last year we have no idea of its size but it contains scores of hadrosaurs, all disarticulated. No skulls are found but all the elements that make up a skull can be found. I like collecting in the section where smaller bones, unguals-toe-carpal-verts, are more typical while others like to go after larger limb bones. My trip to these areas takes me through the Chile Capital of the World, Hatch, New Mexico. Greeting me is Mr Rex a good start to my trip. I hear he is harmless... all show no action Some pictures of the South Dakota site The collecting zone is between the white lines a layer of 2 to 4 feet. The layer is shown below. The top is very crumbly and full of concretions. My Collecting gear consists of a tool box with everything I need to collect My glue field consolidant, orange bottle, without strength but is easy to prep and my structural glue, red. Activator to accelerate curing which rarely used. Tips for the glue Basic Tools I like to use No its not a beach day but temperatures approaching 90 degrees (32C) can get pretty hot so some protection is needed
  18. Rib?

    So, I have a curiosity. I have been, as you may already know, preparing a pair of Edmontosaurus ribs that I obtained, (original location presently unknown, but I can find out.) As I have been piecing the bits together, I have found that I have a third piece that I have reassembled that does not match either rib, nor does it match the material of either rib, but I have been assured they were found in association. It definitely seems like it could be another rib, but I'm not convinced it's from the same critter, or even type of critter. Any thoughts would be appreciated!
  19. Edmontosaurus rib(s) prep

    So I've been working on what I thought originally was 1 Edmontosaurus rib. It has since turned out to be what appears to be an opposing pair of ribs. I thought I would share some of my photos as I go. Please be kind to me, as this is my first vertebrate prep work. Photo I took upon arrival. First rib, top 1/2 complete Top 1/2 with a seemingly extraneous tip, or other unrelated bone. (Not sure.) Working on the head end of the 2nd rib: Matching the other remaining unprepped halves
  20. Documented in this paper is baby hadrosaur that represents the first occurrence of an articulated nestling dinosaur skeleton from the latest Cretaceous (late Maastrichtian) of North America. It's from the Hell Creek of Montana, Garfield County. Edmontosaurus annectens Red... Scapula Purple.. Vert column Green..Pubis Blue.. Femur & Tibia Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. ....Paywalled for non members.. A nestling-sized skeleton of Edmontosaurus(Ornithischia, Hadrosauridae) from the Hell Creek Formation of northeastern Montana, U.S.A., with an analysis of ontogenetic limb allometry Mateusz Wosik,Mark B. Goodwin &David C. Evans http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02724634.2017.1398168?journalCode=ujvp20#.Wog2CXWObFg.twitter
  21. Hi all, I have a group of dinosaur teeth that needs identifying. They are either triceratops or hadrosaur teeth. They come from Hell Creek Formation of Powder County, Montana. All the teeth are roughly 1.5 cm tall 1) I am guessing hadrosaur 2) I am guessing triceratops 3) I am guessing triceratops 4, 5, 6) These 3 are extremely similar. I can't tell what they are.
  22. Edmontosaurus? Rib from Lance Creek

    I'd like to confirm that this is an Edmontosaurus (that's what the seller said). Would species be identifiable? thank you!
  23. Teeth and Bones from Hell Creek

    From the album Dinosaurs and Reptiles

    Teeth and Bones from Hell Creek formation, South Dakota, USA, Maastricthian, Cretaceous. Scalebar 1 cm. A. - Thescelosaurus neglectus tooth. B. - Denversaurus schlessmani tooth. C. - Nanotyrannus lancensis tooth. D. - Richardoestesia sp. tooth. E. - Dromaeosaur tail vertebra. F. - Edmontosaurus annectens shed tooth. G. - Triceratops sp. shed tooth. H. - Crocodile scute. I. - Borealosuchus sternbergi tooth. J. - Brachychampsa montana tooth. K. - Myledaphus pustulosus ray tooth.
  24. WOW pretty cool. Denver Museum of Nature & Science just received its largest fossil donation of more than 6,000 bones The donation includes skulls, vertebrae and limbs of edmontosaurus http://www.denverpost.com/2017/11/28/denver-museum-nature-science-received-6000-bones/
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