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Found 22 results

  1. A Dynamite Dino Donation

    A few months ago we purchased a T-Rex tooth from TFF member @Troodon and he also gave us a super nice Nano tooth. I never got his permission to mention that sale or the gift so I get that anonymous. That is our only T-Rex material and it was also the first fossil donation to our program from a Fossil Forum member. Those teeth really helped us get started becasue it allowed us to use our small budget to fill in other parts of the dinosaur program around having T-Rex stuff. We owe him a huge thank you for that and I wanted to share this on the forum. Well we now have another gigantic THANK YOU to give Frank. I arrived home from work yesterday to find a package from him and it was beautiful dinosaur fossils and some additional non dinosaur Hell Creek material. There were some fantastic fossils in that box and he helped us really strengthen not only the Hell Creek part of dino program but also our African dinosaur section as well. I say this in most of our posts now because it is true. We could not do what we are doing without the support of The Fossil Forum and the members here. @Troodon shares his knowledge and his identification skills with everybody here and that has been invaluable to me. Our dinosaur program is heavily influenced by the knowledge I have gotten from him and bolstered by his generous donations. Thank you Troodon and all of TFF members who donate fossils, share the knowledge and offer encouragement. We really could not do this without you The box o' dinos..... Thescelosaurus fossils (toe bone, vert, two teeth), a beautiful Ceratopsian tooth from HC, an Edmontosaurus tendon, some awesome HC croc teeth, an R.isosceles tooth, a really nice Spino tooth, an abelisaurid tooth,a beautiful Titanosaur indet tooth, and a Ornithomimid toe bone (possibly a juvie Struthiomimus).
  2. I have been working hard lately on all of our programs and we are very close to having the dinosaur presentation I want us to have. We have a name for this program, Dinos Rock. Yes it is not super creative but for 2nd graders, this is a geology themed program. For 3rd graders, it is adaptation based but the name works. We have added some pieces that gives us more than a few teeth. Nothing museum quality or anything but a few bones help the visual factor. I have been studying the biology, geology and ecology of dinosaurs so the science will be good. my son is working on the art but we wont have any done soon, he has school projects a head of this. We are close to being ready a full 6 months before I thought we would be. Hell Creek was going to be a focus for us because the fossils are available and this is the fauna that most kids will recognize. If you are willing to look hard, you can also find some real bargains from this formation. We turned a lot of early attention collecting attention to Hell Creek dinosaurs and I am actually really happy with where we are at with the fossil material we have. There is a lot of room to add and maybe upgrade in the future but this is a good start. This is the famous T-Rex and Triceratops fauna and we started our collection with those critters. Very early on, we were able to get a few Hell CreekTriceratops teeth. I am very happy that through a purchase from TFF member, we added two frill pieces. They are Lance formation but we are not covering the Lance formation yet so they will be used here. I also added a frill piece from Hell Creek. The kids will get to touch the largest frill piece which is a great bonus. An iconic dinosaur and I think well represented. Also early on, we stumbled into a great bit of a luck. A TFF member saw a post of ours and passed it on to another TFF member who sold us a beautiful Tyrannosaurus Rex partial tooth and gave us a really nice Nano too. It was very affordable and a generous gift was added that gave us nice pieces from the most famous dinosaur ever. The rock star really. I was not sure we would be able to get a decent example at all but to do it right off the bat was HUGE. This would not have happened if not for the members that decided to help us out. We are extremely grateful The first dinosaur fossil we got were two Hell Creek Edmontosaurus teeth that were a gift. We acquired a nice jaw fragment in a trade. I am a bargain shopper with a limited budget so I LOVE our Edmontosaurus as it has not cost much at all. I named this display Eddie I like it so much lol Hadrosaurs are important dinosaurs to talk about and I think a fair amount of kids may not know about them. I would like to add another bone later too. They seem attainable for us. Acheroraptor was behind only T-rex on the my list and we got a really beautiful tooth and it was another bargain pick up. I will talk a lot about this species and I will get deep into the biology/ecology of this awesome dino because I love Dromaeosaurids. Raptors are also an iconic dinosaur that kids love and this is a relatively new species which is another fun thing to discuss with the kids. We will also be introducing the kids to a theropod they have never heard of, Richardoestesia gilmorei. I have told me son to envision a toothed Cormorant type dinosaur as I lean toward them being a fish eater. It is pretty cool to get a Hell Creek dino that they will not know anything about. We have yet to add a Thescelosaurus fossil but we will before we start presenting. I want to add another piece of the fauna and it seems this is the most inexpensive option we will have. It will also give the kids another dinosaur they probably do not know and it will round out the basic Hell Creek fauna. There is no shortage of dinosaurs that we can add either. An Anky or Nodosaur scute is way up on the program list of fossils for me and hopefully we can find one from this formation. Dakotaraptor is #1 on my personal list and I will get one eventually. A Troodontid is also very high on the list as well. I know eventually i will also pick up an Ornithominid too. All three of these are more expensive so we will have to save and wait but each one would also make awesome educational dinosaurs. I also really want to add an Avian fossil. I have not researched this but my guess is they are very rare. Leptoceratops is another species I would love to add at some point too. They are really cute and kids will dig them. Anyway, here are some of the fossils. I think we have a good start going to our Hell Creek collection and I am looking forward to taking these to work with me very soon. Pic 1- Triceratops teeth and Eddie Pic 2- T-Rex, Nano, and Hell's Thief. I am so happy to have these fossils. Pic 3- One of the frill pieces. This one will end up in a larger Trike display with more teeth and another frill. Plus we will have nice frill for kids to check out too.
  3. We had an awesome item show up in our mail box today, an Edmontosaurus jaw fragment. It is the product of our first trade on TFF and it is really the first dinosaur piece we have that is not a tooth. We traded an extra dinosaur tooth for it. A Hell Creek for Hell Creek swap. Thank you @Captcrunch227 for an awesome trade and for being a great trade partner. We are super happy with the process and the end result. The mail brought another pleasant surprise. Our Acheroraptor tooth arrived. It is a beautiful tooth and a great addition. As if our day was not busy enough, we secured ourselves an Ankylosaurus tooth from Judith River and it is not a nodosaur. Right tooth from the right formation. I am not saying it is a tooth from Zuul at all but it gives us a chance to tell the kiddos that it MIGHT be . I think Zuul is the perfect species to discuss armored dinos that a lot of kids will recognize but also I am super fired about it. All and all, a pretty fantastic day off from work for me lol
  4. We all know that Magnapaulia was the biggest lambeosaurine hadrosaur that ever lived, but did you know that Kritosaurus means "broken lizard" due to the original specimen being found with broken nasal bones? Did you also know that the name Charonosaurus highlights the fact that it was found near a river by paying homage to the role of Charon in ferrying souls to the underworld along the Styx River? Also note that the name Hypacrosaurus means "under the top lizard" because Barnum Brown considered Hypacrosaurus to be almost the size of T. rex.
  5. On Sunday I took a trip to the Natural History Museum in London. I queued up before it opened at 10am and even before then there was a long queue. I have not visited this museum since I was a child and spent an entire day there (10am to 4.30pm - a long time). I was surprised as it is a lot bigger than I remembered and there was so much to see. This place has the most wonderful things and is an incredible place to learn. The museum showcases a Baryonyx, Sophie the Stegosaurus (the world's most complete Stegosaurus) and more! The moving Trex and Deinonychus are also really realistic in the way they move. If you like your dinosaur teeth, the Megalosaurus and Daspletosaurus teeth are out of this world! There is something for everyone in this museum and I would highly recommend that you visit here if you have not already! A lot of the dinosaur specimens are casts taken from other museums but they are still cool to look at. I had taken the photos on my SLR and due to the size of the photos I had to reduce the quality of them to be able to post on the forum which is unfortunate but it's the only way otherwise the photos would take a really long time to load. There are more non-dinosaur related photos that I will be posting at some point later on but may take me some time to pick out. Enjoy the photos from this section of the museum! Blue Zone Dinosaurs (has a mix of some photos of crocs too)
  6. Spring 2018 Dino Trip

    Anytime you can go collecting fossils its a good time and I would like to share my spring trip to South Dakota and Montana. My South Dakota site is in the upper Hell Creek Formation and full of the hadrosaur Edmontosaurus annectens. I've been collecting this site for over 20 years and its still delivering. We are on the edge of a bluff and the fossil layer can be between 2 to 4 feet. Lots of good bones are to be found but we also have lots of punky or junk bones and about 70 % is collectible. The site is quite large and like I said last year we have no idea of its size but it contains scores of hadrosaurs, all disarticulated. No skulls are found but all the elements that make up a skull can be found. I like collecting in the section where smaller bones, unguals-toe-carpal-verts, are more typical while others like to go after larger limb bones. My trip to these areas takes me through the Chile Capital of the World, Hatch, New Mexico. Greeting me is Mr Rex a good start to my trip. I hear he is harmless... all show no action Some pictures of the South Dakota site The collecting zone is between the white lines a layer of 2 to 4 feet. The layer is shown below. The top is very crumbly and full of concretions. My Collecting gear consists of a tool box with everything I need to collect My glue field consolidant, orange bottle, without strength but is easy to prep and my structural glue, red. Activator to accelerate curing which rarely used. Tips for the glue Basic Tools I like to use No its not a beach day but temperatures approaching 90 degrees (32C) can get pretty hot so some protection is needed
  7. Rib?

    So, I have a curiosity. I have been, as you may already know, preparing a pair of Edmontosaurus ribs that I obtained, (original location presently unknown, but I can find out.) As I have been piecing the bits together, I have found that I have a third piece that I have reassembled that does not match either rib, nor does it match the material of either rib, but I have been assured they were found in association. It definitely seems like it could be another rib, but I'm not convinced it's from the same critter, or even type of critter. Any thoughts would be appreciated!
  8. Edmontosaurus rib(s) prep

    So I've been working on what I thought originally was 1 Edmontosaurus rib. It has since turned out to be what appears to be an opposing pair of ribs. I thought I would share some of my photos as I go. Please be kind to me, as this is my first vertebrate prep work. Photo I took upon arrival. First rib, top 1/2 complete Top 1/2 with a seemingly extraneous tip, or other unrelated bone. (Not sure.) Working on the head end of the 2nd rib: Matching the other remaining unprepped halves
  9. Documented in this paper is baby hadrosaur that represents the first occurrence of an articulated nestling dinosaur skeleton from the latest Cretaceous (late Maastrichtian) of North America. It's from the Hell Creek of Montana, Garfield County. Edmontosaurus annectens Red... Scapula Purple.. Vert column Green..Pubis Blue.. Femur & Tibia Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. ....Paywalled for non members.. A nestling-sized skeleton of Edmontosaurus(Ornithischia, Hadrosauridae) from the Hell Creek Formation of northeastern Montana, U.S.A., with an analysis of ontogenetic limb allometry Mateusz Wosik,Mark B. Goodwin &David C. Evans http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02724634.2017.1398168?journalCode=ujvp20#.Wog2CXWObFg.twitter
  10. Hi all, I have a group of dinosaur teeth that needs identifying. They are either triceratops or hadrosaur teeth. They come from Hell Creek Formation of Powder County, Montana. All the teeth are roughly 1.5 cm tall 1) I am guessing hadrosaur 2) I am guessing triceratops 3) I am guessing triceratops 4, 5, 6) These 3 are extremely similar. I can't tell what they are.
  11. Edmontosaurus? Rib from Lance Creek

    I'd like to confirm that this is an Edmontosaurus (that's what the seller said). Would species be identifiable? thank you!
  12. Teeth and Bones from Hell Creek

    From the album Dinosaurs and Reptiles

    Teeth and Bones from Hell Creek formation, South Dakota, USA, Maastricthian, Cretaceous. Scalebar 1 cm. A. - Thescelosaurus neglectus tooth. B. - Denversaurus schlessmani tooth. C. - Nanotyrannus lancensis tooth. D. - Richardoestesia sp. tooth. E. - Dromaeosaur tail vertebra. F. - Edmontosaurus annectens shed tooth. G. - Triceratops sp. shed tooth. H. - Crocodile scute. I. - Borealosuchus sternbergi tooth. J. - Brachychampsa montana tooth. K. - Myledaphus pustulosus ray tooth.
  13. WOW pretty cool. Denver Museum of Nature & Science just received its largest fossil donation of more than 6,000 bones The donation includes skulls, vertebrae and limbs of edmontosaurus http://www.denverpost.com/2017/11/28/denver-museum-nature-science-received-6000-bones/
  14. Dinosaur Triva

    Tyrannosaurus rex, the initial indication that a big beast existed. This is the first recorded specimen of a T rex tooth collected in 1874. Displayed at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, not described until 1905. Yes other than footprints, dinosaur material has been found in Connecticut. The Jurassic dinosaur skull of Anchisaurus polyzelus, Peabody Museum of Natural History. The label says it all. Type specimen described 1827. The term Dinosaur was coined 1842 by Richard Owens. Did you known that the holes in the dentary of the famous T rex "Sue" were caused by a Trichomonosis like protozoan that may have killed her. Based on other the frequency found on other specimens it's hypothesize that tyrannosaurids were commonly infected by this type of avian parasite. http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0007288 Checkout paper found in Fruitbat's super library. Common Avian Infection Plagued the Tyrant Dinosaurs Ewan D. S. Wolff , Steven W. Salisbury , John R. Horner, David J. Varricchio One of the largest Edmontosaurus annectens. skulls around 50" (127 cm). Museum of the Rockies, Hell Creek Formation, Montana The forelimb of Sinornithosaurus millenii, the first described dromaeosaurid ("raptor") with preserved feathers
  15. This was a bone given to us by our guide in the Hell Creek Formation of South Dakota. I unfortunately did not label it. I think either Triceretops or Edmontosaurus? (those were the common finds for the day...). And would this be a limb bone? The far side is quite semi-circular, and then narrows to more of a smaller oval...
  16. Finishing identifying my daughter's find from this summer at the Hell Creek formation in South Dakota. This one was labeled edmontosaurus bone. Is there a way to get more specific as to *which* bone? It's got a nice curve to it on one side, and the other side has a curve that swoops inward. Just thought I'd ask if those were identifying features...
  17. September 2017 was a busy month for me. Worked a day in the Thornton, CO Triceratops dig with other DMNS volunteers and staff. Then headed up with my son to hang out with my friend Walter Stein (Owner of Paleo Adventures), and some of his friends, to help dig at his Tooth Draw Quarry. Several good fossils were found. I found a Nanotyrannus tooth, a Thescelosaurus ulna, and other teeth and small fossils. My best find though, was a very well preserved left dentary from a mammal that may very likely be Didelphodon, or something closely related. Had a fantastic time and and made new and fun friends. Then this past weekend, I went back up to SD by myself, to help my friend Tom Caggiano (Owner of Lost World Fossils) to dig up Edmontosaurus bones at a monospecific bonebed, with some friends of his that have been collecting there for a very long time. Friday was overall a nice day. But we got rained out on Saturday. So we all headed out to Hill City, SD. First we visited with Sandy Gerken. I got to see her fossil prep lab. And several cool fossils she is working on for clients. Then we went to visit BHI and it's museum. Had the guys pose next to the bronze Triceratops skull out front. Also checked out some nice rock shops in the area. On Sunday, weather caused us to have a late start at the Edmontosaurus Bone bed. Worked on trying to fully expose an Edmontosaurus ilium I found on Friday. It turned out to be much larger than we thought. Only had a little more than a half day to work on it so unfortunately, I only got 3/4 of it exposed for removal. I was leaving Monday morning for home, so Tom Caggiano was going to try and finish pulling it out Monday morning before he also leaves. Unfortunately, they got rained out on Monday too. So Ken And Glenn said they would double foil it cover it up for us. I also found a partial Edmontosaurus maxilla, Edmontosaurus sqaumosal, cervical rib, Ischium, small manus phalanx, and a few Edmontosaurus teeth, some with roots. It was a fun trip. It was a pleasure meeting Ken Roblee, Glenn LaPlaca, and @Troodon. All three are very nice gentlemen. They made me feel quite welcome. @Troodon was a pleasure to finally meet up with. He and I spent a lot of time talking about all things dinosaur fossils. Great guy! All four individuals are, in fact, great guys!
  18. Black Hills Institute Museum

    So I went to the Black Hills Insitute and I made a lot of photos, so I thought I'd share. The Black Hills Institute museum in Hill City is pretty small, it's just one hall. But this one hall is absolutely packed with stuff. This is also the home of the T. rex Stan. Many of the skeletons are casts, but there are plenty of real fossils here as well. The skeleton of Stan. This is the real skeleton and the real skull is placed beside it in the corner. But I didn't even notice that at the time. Skull of Torosaurus. Notice the holes in the frill. Triceratops doesn't have these holes in it's frill. Tylosaurus proriger. Another real specimen. Two Allosaurus skeletons. An Ornithomimid as well as Stan, the Senckenberg Edmontosaurus mummy and Tarbosaurus skull in the background. Skeleton of Albertosaurus, skull of Albertosaurus on the left and skull of Gorgosaurus on the right. A second T. rex skeleton. And a lineup of T. rex skulls in the background. Thescelosaurus and Pachycephalosaurus. Juvenile Edmontosaurus skeleton below the second T. rex skeleton. Cast of the Triceratops Raymond. Crestless Pteranodon on the left as well as a Nyctosaurus? arm/wing at the bottom. Dromaeosaurus in the middle between the legs of the Triceratops and a primitive Sirenian with legs on the right. Bambiraptor and Archaeopteryx skeletons. Foot and skull of Deinonychus and Herrerasaurus, Dromaeosaurus and Eoraptor skulls at the bottom. T. rex arm (cast of Sue) and brian endocast left. Nanotyrannus skull on the right. Mongolian Dinosaurs. Saichania and Saurolophus skulls at the top. Velociraptor skull and oviraptorid partial skeletons below that. Prenocephale, Oviraptor, Archaeornithimimus and Alioramus at the bottom. Tethyshadros top left, and Psittacosaurus nest, and skeletons on the bottom left. Brontosaurus leg in the middle and baby Apatosaurus on the right. Velociraptor and Protoceratops fighting on the far right. Edaphosaurus skeleton. And this is just a small selection of the photos I took. There's just so much stuff here and I only spent a few hours here. The gift shop is also worth a vist btw. I bought a rather nice replica of a tooth from Stan and a Thescelosaurus phalange.
  19. My Edmontosaurus collection

    Gday all, this is my Edmontosaurus collection so far. Most of the bones here are from the left foot of an Edmontosaurus but there are a few other pieces, rib sections and teeth. I'm trying to build a complete left foot, originally I didn't set out to do this but I bought a few toe bones and soon realised that the majority of them were from the left foot so I decided to turn it into a project. It will take me some time to source the correct bones but that will also give me some time to save for them! I have a few bones that aren't right, for example met 111-1 is the correct bone but just too small so I need a larger one to keep everything in proportion but waiting and searching is all part of the fun. Thanks for looking, Dave.
  20. Dinosaur bone repair question

    Gday all, . Recently I bought a nice Edmontosaurus metatarsal which arrived this week, unfortunately somewhere along the 20000 kilometre trip to Australia it was broken. It was packaged well by the seller but the box was ripped and damaged when it arrived on my doorstep - would be nice if the posties took a bit more care of people's property when it is entrusted into their hands but that's another story. The bone has been broken in half with a smaller piece being broken from one of the halves. I can match it up very well which is good but my question is what is the best glue to use for this purpose? I was going to use super glue to repair it but thought it might save me some grief if I asked here first before I make it even worse. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for taking the time to read this, cheers, Dave.
  21. Dinosaur skin are a highly sought-after fossil. The ones usually available to collectors are Edmontosaurus skin impressions from Lance, or Hell Creek Formation, and they aren't as rare or expensive as you might expect, fetching up to 100-200 USD per inch depending on quality. However, it is easy to mistake a bumpy piece of rock, mud sediment, septarian nodule, concretions, or a coral fossil as dino skin. Right now there are at least several of such on our favorite auction site. Here are examples of fossils/pseudofossils mistaken as dinosaur skin: And here are real Edmontosaurus skin impressions: Positives: Negatives: So how do we tell real skin impressions from misidentified ones? Honestly, it isn't always easy, but here are four basic guidelines. 1) Skin impressions come as negatives or positives. If it comes with both, even better! 2) Skin impressions are rarely ever a complete piece by themselves(not the way a tooth or an ammonite is). Instead, skin impressions are often fragments, or look like they are broken off from larger chunks 3) There should be a uniform shape to each individual scale/osteoderm. Refer to the negative pictures above 4) Most skin impressions come from South Dakota. If you get another locality, be on extra alert - it's either another species(and thus very expensive), or misidentified If in doubt, ask the forum before purchasing. There are plenty of experts here glad to help. Have fun shopping!
  22. My growing collection

    Here's a couple of pics of my growing collection. It is a mixture of purchased pieces and self collected pieces, it's all a bit disorganised at the moment but I will work out a way of displaying it properly. I really like the hadrosaur pieces, I would like to get to the point where I could put together a complete foot, although it will be mixed and matched I still think it would display well. Thanks for looking.
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