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Found 89 results

  1. This is a clutch of 3 eggs from Heyuan, China. The egg measures about 9cm. Are they genuine? What about the shell coverage %?
  2. Saitta, E.T., Vinther, J., Crisp, M.K., Abbott, G.D., Kaye, T.G., Pittman, M., Bull, I., Fletcher, I., Chen, X., Collins, M.J. and Sakalauskaite, J., 2020. Non-avian dinosaur eggshell calcite contains ancient, endogenous amino acids. bioRxiv 2020.06.02.129999 preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.06.02.129999 https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.06.02.129999v1 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/341881580_NON-AVIAN_DINOSAUR_EGGSHELL_CALCITE_CONTAINS_ANCIENT_ENDOGENOUS_AMINO_ACIDS https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Evan_Saitta Free pdf: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.06.02.129999v1.full.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  3. Dinosaur Egg

    Can someone please help identify this egg the texture is different from an Oviraptor egg I have? Possibly Macroolithus rugustus?
  4. Hi! This looks good to me, I just want to confirm if this is genuine. Thanks in advance!
  5. Concretions or Eggs

    Hi All, I'm new to the forum and I have no paleontology experience other than a class from undergrad 20 something years ago. My background is structural geology, hence my post here in hopes that I may confirm my suspicion as to the genesis of the specimens in the attached pictures. First a little background: I was in the field yesterday doing some reconnaissance work in east-central Wyoming. The land owners whose property I was on are multi-generational ranchers and they were extremely welcoming and enthusiastic about the geology of the area, despite having limited knowledge. At the end of the day, standing in their yard saying thank you's and goodbye's one of the college-age sons came running up with 2 specimens of what I presume to be concretions. However, the texture was smoother than other concretions I have seen and there was a dimpled character to the extremity of both which I found odd. The kicker is that the southern end of their property has a full section of Jurassic Morrison Fm exposed. When I asked what the rock looked like in the area that he found them, his description matched what could be interpreted as the variegated sands and shales of the Morrison Fm. Of course, it could also describer some of the Miocene sediments unconformably overlying the Cloverly Fm in the area as well. Regarding the photographs attached: I did not take the specimens with me, only the photos attached with my phone in the land owner's front yard. Therefore I do not have scale other than to say the index finger of my left hand is 9.5 cm and my left thumb is 7 cm from tip to base knuckle. Any help would be greatly appreciated as I told the landowner's son I'd be happy to do a little research on his behalf. Much thanks in advance! -WyoOtto
  6. Cretaceous vertebrates of North America

    here A new microvertebrate assemblage from the Mussentuchit Member, Cedar Mountain Formation: insights into the paleobiodiversity and paleobiogeography of early Late Cretaceous ecosystems in western North America Haviv M. Avrahami, Terry A. Gates, Andrew B. Heckert, Peter J. Makovicky, Lindsay E. Zanno PeerJ 6:e5883 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.5883 about 11 MB
  7. Oviraptor / hadrosaur eggs

    Finally able to properly display my 2 eggs
  8. Hello all! ive recently purchased this piece (I know I should have consulted beforehand) but I only saw it the last minute before the auction ended. I would still love some insight on it and maybe an actual idea of its locality and species (or genera). The seller claims there is no restoration other than gluing different parts together. He also claims its Enlongatoolithidae either raptor or oviraptor or other therapoda. I would love to have better information on it and even its locality in China, since I assume that’s where it’s from. The fossil is 15 cm long. Unfortunately these are the best photos I could get for the timebeing until it arrives. Best wishes to all, Mohammed
  9. Possible Dinosaur Egg?

    Trying to figure out what this may be it was found in Oregon but no information on the location or the size any ideas?
  10. Hadrosaur Egg

    My Hadrosaur egg finally came in I was really happy with it there’s also a place in the matrix where another egg laid
  11. I’m newer to the site and I’m trying to figure out if these eggs are real before I buy them they all come with a letter of authenticity and locations to where they was found and a bunch of other information can someone please shed some light on these photos for me
  12. Oviraptor eggs

    Hi All, hope everyone had a great Christmas. I hope someone can help, I recently received a quantity of egg shells, originating from China. They are from Oviraptor supposedly. My question is that some have nodes, others have ridges, some have something in between. Is this just something that differs from individual to individual or from species to species? A search on Google images show a selection of both nodes or ridges so I am none the wiser.
  13. My recent find

    Picked up lbs and lbs of these dinosaur egg shells this weekend at a show anyone know what these species they may come from? Thanks for everyone’s help the nest they were found in had a bunch of crushed eggs and only a few whole eggs which I will be getting next month I’ll make sure to post the pics
  14. I've really started to look for fossils of interest to me (I'm a newbie to it, and have had fun researching). Dino eggs make me the most nervous, after reading (including on this site) about all the fakes --- even those sold at "reputable" auctions. I'm especially interested in Sauropods and came across these. Details: "Hypselosaurus priscus", Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous, discovered in France. 1. I've been comparing to images on this site that users have noted are real --- and I feel those characteristics and things to look for align with these. But am I missing anything? 2. These are hatched, correct? This was my assumption based on unhatched examples (and the price!), but the auction language made it unclear. Thanks for your insights --- I've had fun lurking the site and learning as a non-member for quite a while.
  15. Need help

    so i went to Orlando Science Center today for the Dino Digs exhibition but in Jurassic Ridge dig pit area i know that there is a Camptosaurus, Camarasaurus, Ceratosaurus and a Stegosaurus, but there is some species and genus of dinosaurs and other animals that i dont know what there like take for example the turtle shell, the alligator crocodile like animal fossil, the ankylosaur like fossil and that bone that i dont know what species does it belong to and that nest that i don't know which dinosaur does it belong to.
  16. Dinosaur Eggs

    I am sure this is a ridiculous question.. but could these be dinosaur eggs?
  17. Clutch of small eggs?

    Found this a couple days ago on my ranch. Western Colorado - Morrison Formation. On the surface. No prep besides light brushing. I'm not that knowledgeable, but could this be a clutch of small dinosaur or other ancient reptile eggs? Lots of dinosaur activity in the area. Probably about 20 eggs total including what isn't visible in the middle. 105g total weight. They measure roughly 1/2 inch or 1.25cm each. Larger pics included in link. Thank you https://postimg.cc/gallery/nni2692y/508eae1d/
  18. Eggs?

    I believe my dad found these in northeast Texas. Can anyone help identify?
  19. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/ancient-mongolian-nests-show-dinosaurs-protected-their-eggs/ https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-7251971/Dinosaur-mothers-nested-groups-PROTECTED-eggs-predators-just-modern-birds-do.html
  20. My wife and I went to our other property to look for some stuff for the church garage sale. Gots lots of stuff but also ran into this box with my last dino eggs. I bought these in 1995 or 96? Been a very long time since ive seen these. My memory was that these were perfect? Now I can see that is not so! These eggs have problems for sure but im purty sure they are real, just a bit fixed up? Any ideas are appreciated. thanks RB
  21. fossil pregnant with implications

    LINK A GRAVID FOSSIL TURTLE FROM THE EARLY CRETACEOUS REVEALS A DIFFERENT EGG DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY TO THAT OF EXTANT MARINE TURTLES EDWIN-ALBERTO CADENA , MARY L. PARRA-RUGE, JUAN DE D. PARRA-RUGE and SANTIAGO PADILLA-BERNAL [Palaeontology, 2018, pp. 1–13] (slightly less than 6 MB a more popular capsule description of the find 2015-09-oldest-fossil-sea-turtle.pdf @MiseriKing @Tidgy's Dad
  22. One of my favorite fossil types. Dinosaur eggs come in all shapes and sizes — from an oval as small as a thumb, to a sphere as big as a basketball. These fossils are often faked by the hundreds, if not thousands, in Chinese factories (China is also the world's richest source of true dinosaur eggs). However, there are also many natural-occurring objects mistaken as dinosaur eggs such as concretions or even fortuitously-shaped rocks. Despite these hurdles, dinosaur eggs remain one of the most desirable of all fossils. NOTE: Dinosaur egg and eggshells, by their nature as an ichnofossil, are challenging for private collectors to identify. None of the IDs I provide here are acceptable on a scientific level as I lack the tools to examine the cross section slices of my eggshells. However, for the sake of documentation I will still provide accurate names and locality here to the best of my ability. First up are my Oviraptorid eggs "Common" Name: Oviraptor egg Elongatoolithus sp. 71 - 66 mya | late Cretaceous Nanxiong Basin, Guangdong "Common" Name: Citipati egg Macroolithus yaotunensis 71 - 66 mya | late Cretaceous Nanxiong Basin, Guangdong Length: 8.78 inches (Note: Has composited eggshells) "Common" Name: Oviraptorid(small type) Nest Elongatoolithus sp. 71 - 66 mya | late Cretaceous Nanxiong Formation Guangdong
  23. Egg?

    Hi I'm new to this but find it very interesting. I found what I thought was a petrified egg but now I'm not so sure. Is this just a rock?
  24. Fossilized Eggs? Found in Missouri.

    These came from a box of rocks my grandfather had collected. Fossilized eggs?? Probably not, but what the heck are they?
  25. A number of possible trilobite eggs from the Middle Ordovician Sueve Formation of the Cantabrian Zone were found and studied, during the construction of a tunnel in northern Spain. They found many pyrite spheres which they believe to be eggs from members of the pliomeridae family of trilobites. They also found different post-embryonic stages of calymenacean trilobites. I do not know as much as I would like to about trilobites, but I found the idea of fossilized trilobite eggs interesting. Does anyone know if trilobite eggs have been found before? I left links to the paper below! Thank you for reading. https://scholar.google.com/scholar?as_ylo=2019&q=trilobite+&hl=en&as_sdt=0,33&as_vis=1#d=gs_qabs&u=%23p%3D8GgXRgHLIFUJ https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=12qNDwAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PA23&dq=info:8GgXRgHLIFUJ:scholar.google.com/&ots=ndL4Yvl33A&sig=77hwzzM82cT_-YA_qeGIEKx1Z5Q#v=onepage&q&f=false
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