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Found 20 results

  1. The Basic Dinosaur Egg Guide Many people often mistake a concretion for an egg, to help clarify what is a concretion, and what is a real egg, here is a guide. A quick overview with examples: How to spot a concretion: How are they different from eggs? A concretion is a rather common rock made of tightly compressed minerals. Typically, concretions are a smooth sphere or oval with little to no surface texture or just a few bumps. Often nearly a perfect sphere, sometimes more of an oval. In a concretion, there
  2. BirdsRDinos

    Veins?

    Are these vein imprints?
  3. Saitta, E.T., Vinther, J., Crisp, M.K., Abbott, G.D., Kaye, T.G., Pittman, M., Bull, I., Fletcher, I., Chen, X., Collins, M.J. and Sakalauskaite, J., 2020. Non-avian dinosaur eggshell calcite contains ancient, endogenous amino acids. bioRxiv 2020.06.02.129999 preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.06.02.129999 https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.06.02.129999v1 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/341881580_NON-AVIAN_DINOSAUR_EGGSHELL_CALCITE_CONTAINS_ANCIENT_ENDOGENOUS_AMINO_ACIDS https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Evan_Saitta
  4. Earliest example of animal nest sharing revealed by scientists University of Southampton, February 20, 2019 https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190220103421.htm https://phys.org/news/2019-02-earliest-animal-revealed-scientists.html Fernández, M.S., Wang, X., Vremir, M., Laurent, C., Naish, D., Kaiser, G. and dyke, G., 2019. A mixed vertebrate eggshell assemblage from the Transylvanian Late Cretaceous. Scientific reports, 9(1), article 1944. Open Access https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-36305-3 https://www.researchgate.net/publ
  5. One of my favorite fossil types. Dinosaur eggs come in all shapes and sizes — from an oval as small as a thumb, to a sphere as big as a basketball. These fossils are often faked by the hundreds, if not thousands, in Chinese factories (China is also the world's richest source of true dinosaur eggs). However, there are also many natural-occurring objects mistaken as dinosaur eggs such as concretions or even fortuitously-shaped rocks. Despite these hurdles, dinosaur eggs remain one of the most desirable of all fossils. NOTE: Dinosaur egg and eggshells, by their nature as an ichnofossi
  6. CBchiefski

    Advanced Dinosaur Egg Guide

    The Advanced Dinosaur Egg Guide Please share this with those who have egg questions. When possible, technical terms were avoided or defined. Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy, but it is always important to do your own research. This guide is merely a snapshot of information taken from many scientific publications. I am not an expert on eggs, rather I just love sharing what little I have learned over the years, what science has learned over the years. For an overview on how to spot a fossilized dinosaur egg and the sizes of eggs, see the basic guide:
  7. DatFossilBoy

    Surprise in the mailbox :)

    Hey everyone. Little compensation after a unsuccessful and rainy school day My 31 Megaloolithus eggshell fragments have arrived! Very happy with this Dino egg bundle since I did not have any before and bought them all for nothing. Some of them have really stunning detail. A special thank you to everyone who helped IDing them as Megaloolithus . A nice addition to my Dino collection. (Also bought 2 trilobites from the same seller including an Ampyx I will soon be posting .!) Hope you like the post. Kind regards to everyone.
  8. Masp

    Eggshell ID Pyroraptor?

    Eggshell experts out there, came across this fragment said to be Pyroraptor South of France. This is the only picture provided...is it rare and is it Pyroraptor?
  9. David Evans and crew from the ROM have been collecting in the Hell Creek of Montana instead of their usual Judith River localities. They have not reported finding much but today's Twitter feed David posted these pictures and commented "We found dinosaur eggshell today! It’s a rarity for the Hell Creek Formation. Thanks to Wendy Sloboda for her expert help finding it.". Have never been lucky enough to find any and like David indicated they are pretty rare in the HC. @-Andy- @HamptonsDoc @CBchiefski hazard a guess what type they are?
  10. mattman10

    Nanxiong Dinosaur Eggshell

    I have a large group of dinosaur eggshell fragments from the Nanxiong Formation of China. As they're isolated fragments I know its difficult to narrow them down to any particular oogenus, but I was wondering if it is possible to say anything about them just by surface texture alone? From what I can gather, eggshells with nodes and ridges from this formation would indicate a theropod eggshell, where as the smoother eggshells are more likely herbivour (probably hadrosaur). I've added pictures of each type. I've struggled to find a lot of detail on Nanxiong eggs which
  11. From the album: Vertebrates

    Dinosaur eggshell (Saltasaurus) from the Upper Cretaceous of Argentina.
  12. Mousehead

    Hollow Reptile Egg Fossil

    Hey guys! I'm curious about this egg fossil I've got here – it's been preserved with its hollow shell intact and sort of crystalized. I know there are loads of these eggs out there, but I've never seen one like this before so I'm wondering how unusual it really is. The other egg seems to be solid when held under a bright light. Here's what I know about it: – Ophidienovum sp – From a snake, I think – Tertiary/Miocene – From Mainz, Germany – Eggs are 2cm long Would love to hear your input!
  13. Hi all, I have come across numerous theropod eggshells sold as "Oviraptor from Mongolia" through the years. Mostly, I pay them no heed. As I am aware, whole Oviraptor eggs from Mongolia are in fact Elongatoolithus sp. eggs from Guangdong or other parts of China. True Mongolian eggs are very rare. What about these eggshells though? My guess is that thousands of them come out of China, the same way as the eggs and egg nests. But then again, eggshells are more common, and is it that implausible for some of them to be Mongolian in origin? I label mine as being from China, b
  14. mattman10

    Dinosaur Eggshell ID

    I traded some fossils for a bunch of European dinosaur eggshells a few years back, a mix from France and Spain. However, I stupidly misplaced the labels for these two sets of eggshells and now have no idea which site they came from (they appear to be from two different sites, judging by the colouration). I know it's a long shot, but if anyone with an interest in European dinosaur eggshells could shed some light on where these eggshells came from, it would be much appreciated. All are around 2mm tick.
  15. Ramon

    Dinosaur eggshell ID

    I recently bought this fossil which is a dinosaur eggshell that came from China. It is late cretaceous in age. You can even see red coloration which is the remaining sediment from where it was collected from. I want to know which dinosaur layed it. I think the fossil is Elongatoolithudae which is the type of egg that Oviraptorids layed. Front The back which is very smooth
  16. Czacha

    Gastornis eggshell ID

    Hello! I bought Gastornis eggshell with certificate. I am novice so I would like to ask you if I can be certain that it is authentic Gastornis eggshell? I am asking because maybe everyone can create similar certificate and selling fake fossils. I do no know. Can you help me?
  17. Ancient eggshell protein breaks through DNA time barrier Scientists have identified fossil proteins in a 3.8 million year-old ostrich eggshell, suggesting that proteins could provide valuable new insights into the evolutionary tree, much further back in time than was previously thought. The study, published in the journal eLife, suggests that survival of protein fragments in the ancient eggshell could provide genetic information almost 50 times older than any DNA record. The findings shed new light on how animals and humans lived and interacted in the past, how some sp
  18. megabass22

    Some New Fossils

    Heya! I´ve bought some new fossils the last few months, and thought that i would make a topic of some of them, so here they are: Here´s a shark tooth from Morocco: A quite large mosasaur tooth from Khourigba, belonging to Liodon anceps: Here´s a swedish trilobite, Asaphus expansus, it´s not in great condition but these are quite rare on the market anyway and there is something special about owning fossils depicting the prehistory of your own country: Here´s some Oviraptor eggshell fragments, its not an egg, but i like them anyway: Here´s my new favourite fossil, a beautiful piece of
  19. ThePrehistoricMaster

    What Dinosaur Is This Eggshell From?

    Hi. I got a little eggshell, but i'm wondering what dinosaur it is from. The only information i have is: 1. It was found in the city General Roca in Argentina. 2. It is about 80 million years old. 3. It is from a Titanosaur. Hope someone can find the dinosaur.
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