Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'enantiornithes'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 7 results

  1. I read news stories about the discovery of extinct birds in Myanmar being preserved in Burmese amber. Does any have an idea of how these birds could have survived in Burmese amber without their skin decomposing? Can you image a Miocene fossil bird from the Caribbean being preserved in Dominican amber?
  2. New bird from the Cretaceous of Utah

    hey everyone - hope you're all well Thought this was worth sharing - a description of a well-preserved enantiornithean bird specimen from the Late Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation of Utah. It represents a new genus and species, Mirarce eatoni. The specimen was originally collected in 1992, but it was only recently described (and published yesterday!). Atterholt et al. (2018). The most complete enantiornithine from North America and a phylogenetic analysis of the Avisauridae. PeerJ, DOI 10.7717/peerj.5910 Abstract: The most complete known North American enantiornithine was collected in 1992 but never formally described. The so-called “Kaiparowits avisaurid” remains one of the most exceptional Late Cretaceous enantiornithine fossils. We recognize this specimen as a new taxon, Mirarce eatoni (gen. et sp. nov.), and provide a complete anatomical description. We maintain that the specimen is referable to the Avisauridae, a clade previously only known in North America from isolated tarsometatarsi. Information from this specimen helps to clarify evolutionary trends within the Enantiornithes. Its large body size supports previously observed trends toward larger body mass in the Late Cretaceous. However, trends toward increased fusion of compound elements across the clade as a whole are weak compared to the Ornithuromorpha. The new specimen reveals for the first time the presence of remige papillae in the enantiornithines, indicating this feature was evolved in parallel to dromaeosaurids and derived ornithuromorphs. Although morphology of the pygostyle and (to a lesser degree) the coracoid and manus appear to remain fairly static during the 65 million years plus of enantiornithine evolution, by the end of the Mesozoic at least some enantiornithine birds had evolved several features convergent with the Neornithes including a deeply keeled sternum, a narrow furcula with a short hypocleidium, and ulnar quill knobs—all features that indicate refinement of theflight apparatus and increased aerial abilities. We conduct the first cladistic analysis to include all purported avisuarid enantiornithines, recovering an Avisauridae consisting of a dichotomy between North and South American taxa. Based on morphological observations and supported by cladistic analysis, we demonstrate Avisaurus to be paraphyletic and erect a new genus for “A. gloriae,” Gettyia gen. nov. here's the paper: Atterholt et al. Hope you like it! -Christian
  3. https://news.sky.com/story/prehistoric-baby-bird-could-help-shed-light-on-evolution-11277434
  4. Pterosaur or Enantiornithine coracoids?

    Dear Guys, I have found three coracoid bones in flintstone that are about 0,5 cm length and made the cavities of them by needle. There are two versions about these fossil ID in my opinion- enantiornithine bird or pterosaur (pterosaur is more possible because the lower wider part of bones is not very wide as in almost all birds and the pterosaur, e.g. ornithocheiridae coracoid shape is very similar!). If these are pterosaur coracoid bones they should belong to small species (maybe rhamphorhynchoids), if small bird bones- they should be very primitive, probably early Cretaceous and I do not know any birds with this shape except Enantiophoenix (Enantiophoenix coracoid is even little wider and the bone cavity is very small, not so big as in my specimens). Please help to identify these remains by the coracoid form in pterosaurs, primitive birds or even tiny dinosaurs. Any help will be appreciated! Best Regards Domas
  5. Bird bones in flint- please help to confirm

    Dear Guys, I recently collected three examples of interesting small bones that have the cavities in the same area, I found them in flint erratics of South Lithuania. One scientist (Jens Koppka) told be that one time the occasional bird bone in flint was found by his colleagues in Lithuania. I recenly found the link with very similar shape of bone known as Enantiophoenix in the middle picture of one publication that I share with you now : https://peerj.com/articles/1032/ Open this link and look for "Comparison of scapulocoracoid between the dromaeosaurid Balaur and other paravians", the cavity in the second scapulocoracoid picture is named as "snf". Please look at my fossil pictures and this link and help with confirmation if you could. Best Regards Domas
  6. New Mesozoic Bird From Brazil

    You should read these papers. They are very interesting: Carvalho, I.; Novas, F.E.; Agnolín, F.L.; Isasi, M.P.; Freitas, F.I.; Andrade, J.A.. (2015). "A new genus and species of enantiornithine bird from the Early Cretaceous of Brazil". Brazilian Journal of Geology 45 (2): 161–171. DOI:10.1590/23174889201500020001. Carvalho, I.; Novas, F.E.; Agnolín, F.L.; Isasi, M.P.; Freitas, F.I.; Andrade, J.A.. (2015). "A Mesozoic bird from Gondwana preserving feathers". Nature Communications 6. DOI:10.1038/ncomms8141. The discovery of Cratoavis in Brazil is remarkable because nearly all Early to Middle Cretaceous birds have been found in Laurasia (Nanantius is the only other pre-Santonian bird found in Gondwana). It'd be interesting to see if there might be any Early and Middle Cretaceous birds from North Africa and the rest of South America because we now know that the multitude of Early Cretaceous bird fossils in China was due to a Mesozoic version of Pompeii.
  7. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since May 3, 2018. Order Saurichia Suborder Theropoda Clade Ornithothoraces Subclass Enantiornithes Primitive Enantiornithes Ji, S.-A., et al. (2011). A new, three-dimensionally preserved enantiornithine bird (Aves: Ornithothoraces) from Gansu Province, north-western China. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 162. Kurochkin, E.N., et al. (2006). On the Brain of a Primitive Bird from the Upper Cretaceous of European Russia. Paleontological Journal, Vol.40, Number 6. O'Connor, J.K. (2012). A Revised Look at Liaoningornis longidigitrus (Aves). Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 50(1). Sanz, J.L., et al. (1996). An Early Cretaceous bird from Spain and its implications for the evolution of avian flight.Nature, Vol.382. Wang, M., Z. Zhou and C. Sullivan (2016). A Fish-Eating Enantiornithine Bird from the Early Cretaceous of China Provides Evidence of Modern Avian Digestive Features. Current Biology. Wang, M., H. Hu and Z. Li (2015). A new small enantiornithine bird from the Jehol Biota, with implications for early evolution of avian skull morphology. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, published on-line. Wang, Y., et al. (2016). A New Jehol Enantiornithine Bird With Three-Dimensional Preservation and Ovarian Follicles. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, e1054496. Primitive Euenantiornithes O'Connor, J. and G. ###### (2010). A Reassessment of Sinornis santensis and Cathayornis yandica (Aves: Enantiornithes). Records of the Australian Museum, Vol.62. Wang, M. and D. Liu (2015). Taxonomical reappraisal of Cathayornithidae (Aves: Enantiornithes). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, 14(1). Wang, M., Z. Zhou and G. Xu (2014). The First Enantiornithine Bird from the Upper Cretaceous of China. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 34(1). Family Avisauridae Brett-Surman, M.K. and G.S. Paul (1985). A New Family of Bird-Like Dinosaurs Linking Laurasia and Gondwanaland. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 5(2). Chiappe, L.M. (1992). Enantiornithine (Aves) Tarsometatarsi and the Avian Affinities of the Late Cretaceous Avisauridae.Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 12(3). Chiappe, L.M. and J.O. Calvo (1994). Neuquenornis volans, A New Late Cretaceous Bird (Enantiornithes: Avisauridae) From Patagonia, Argentina. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 14(2). Chiappe, L.M., et al. (2002). New Enantiornithine Bird from the Marine Upper Cretaceous of Alabama. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 22(1). Novas, F.E., F.L. Agnolin and C.A. Scanferla (2010). New enantiornithine bird (Aves, Ornithothoraces) from the Late Cretaceous of NW Argentina. C.R. Palevol, xx, xxx. (Article in Press) Sanz, J.L. and A.D. Buscalioni (1992). A New Bird from the Early Cretaceous of Las Hoyas, Spain, and the Early Radiation of Birds. Palaeontology, Vol.35, Part 4. Sanz, J.L., et al. (1995). The Osteology of Concornis lacustris (Aves: Enantiornithes) from the Lower Cretaceous of Spain and a Reexamination of its Phylogenetic Relationships. American Museum Novitates, Number 3133. Family Bohaiornithidae Peteya, J.A., et al. (2017). The Plumage and Colouration of an Enantiornithine Bird from the Early Cretaceous of China. Palaeontology, Vol.60, Part 1. Wang, M., et al. (2014). A new diverse enantiornithine family (Bohaiornithidae fam.nov.) from the Lower Cretaceous of China with information from two new species. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 52(1). Wang, X., et al. (2010). New Species of Enantiornithes (Aves: Ornithothoraces) from the Qiaotou Formation in Northern Hebei, China. Acta Geologica Sinica (English Edition), Vol.84, Number 2. Zhang, Y., et al. (2014). New information on the anatomy of Chinese Early Cretaceous Bohaiornithidae (Aves: Enantiornithes) from a subadult specimen of Zhouornis hani. PeerJ, 2:e407; DOI 10.7717/peerj.407. Family Gobipterygidae Chiappe, L.M., et al. (2001). A New Skull of Gobipteryx minuta (Aves: Enantiornithes) from the Cretaceous of the Gobi Desert.American Museum Novitates, Number 3346. Elżanowski, A. (1977). Skulls of Gobipteryx (Aves) from the Upper Cretaceous of Mongolia. Palaeontologica Polonica, Number 37. Elżanowski, A. (1974). Preliminary Note on the Palaeognathous Bird from the Upper Cretaceous of Mongolia. Palaeontologica Polonica, Number 30. Zhang, F., et al. (2004). Description of a new enantiornithine bird from the Early Cretaceous of Hebei, northern China.Can. J. Earth Sci., 41. Family Longipterygidae Hou, L.-H., et al. (2004). New Early Cretaceous fossil from China documents a novel trophic specialization for Mesozoic birds. Naturwissenschaften, 91. Hou, L.-H., et al. (1999). Archaeopteryx to Opposite Birds - Missing Link from the Mesozoic of China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 37(2). O'Connor, J., et al. (2010). Anatomy of the Early Cretaceous bird Rapaxavis pani (Aves: Enantiornithes). Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 56(X). O'Connor, J.K., et al. (2009). Phylogenetic Support for a Specialized Clade of Cretaceous Enantiornithine Birds With Information from a New Species. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 29(1). Wang, X., et al. (2015). New material of Longipteryx (Aves: Enantiornithes) from the Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation of China with the first recognized avian tooth crenulations. Zootaxa, 3941(4). Zhou, Z. (1995). Discovery of a New Enantiornithine Bird from the Early Cretaceous of Liaoning, China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 33(2). Zhou, Z., L.M. Chiappe and F. Zhang (2005). Anatomy of the Early Cretaceous bird Eoenantiornis buhleri (Aves: Enantiornithes) from China. Can.J. Earth Sci., 42. Family Pengornithidae Hu, H., J.K. O'Connor and Z. Zhou (2015). A New Species of Pengornithidae (Aves: Enantiornithes) from the Lower Cretaceous of China Suggests a Specialized Scansorial Habitat Previously Unknown in Early Birds. PLoS ONE, 10(6). Hu, H., Z.-H. Zhou and J.K. O'Connor (2014). A subadult specimen of Pengornis and character evolution in Enantiornithes. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 52(1). O'Connor, J.K., et al. (2015). Evolution and functional significance of derived sternal ossification patterns in ornithothoracine birds. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 28(8). Wang, X., et al. (2014). Insights into the evolution of rachis dominated tail feathers from a new basal enantiornithine (Aves: Ornithothoraces). Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 113. Zhou, Z., J. Clarke and F. Zhang (2008). Insight into diversity, body size and morphological evolution from the largest Early Cretaceous enantiornithine bird. J.Anat., 212. General Enantiornithes Cambra-Moo, O., et al. (2006). Estimating the Ontogenetic Status of an Enantiornithine Bird from the Lower Barremian of El Montsec, Central Pyrenees, Spain. Estudios Geológicos, 62(1). Chiappe, L.M. (1993). Enantiornithine (Aves) Tarsometatarsi from the Cretaceous Lecho Formation of Northwestern Argentina. American Museum Novitates, Number 3083. Chiappe, L.M., J. Shu'an, and J. Qiang (2007). Juvenile Birds from the Early Cretaceous of China: Implications for Enantiornithine Ontogeny. American Museum Novitates, Number 3594. dyke, G., et al. (2012). A drowned Mesozoic bird breeding colony from the Late Cretaceous of Transylvania. Naturwissenschaften, published on-line. Harris, J.D., et al. (2006). A second enantiornithean (Aves: Ornithothoraces) wing from the Early Cretaceous Xiagou Formation near Changma, Gansu Province, People's Republic of China.Can. J. Earth Science, 43. Hu, D., et al. (2012). A New Enantiornithine Bird from the Lower Cretaceous of Western Liaoning, China, and Its Implications for Early Avian Evolution. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 32(3). Lamanna, M.C., et al. (2006). a partial skeleton of an enantiornithine bird from the Early Cretaceous of northwestern China. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 51(3). Li, D., et al. (2017). Flight aerodynamics in enantiornithines: Information from a new Chinese Early Cretaceous bird. PLoS ONE, 12(10). O'Connor, J.K., et al. (2014). The histology of two female Early Cretaceous birds. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 52(1). Osi, A. (2008). Enantiornithine bird remains from the Late Cretaceous of Hungary. Oryctos, Vol.7. Walker, C.A., E. Buffetaut and G.J. ###### (2007). Large euenantiornithine birds from the Cretaceous of southern France, North America and Argentina. Geol.Mag., 144(6). Wang, M., Z. Li and Z. Zhou (2017). Insight into the growth pattern and bone fusion of basal birds from an Early Cretaceous enantiornithine bird. PNAS, Vol.114, Number 43. Wang, M., et al. (2017). A bizarre Early Cretaceous enantiornithine bird with unique crural feathers and an ornithouromorph plough-shaped pygostyle. Nature Communications, 8:14141. Wang, X., et al. (2011). A euenantiornithine bird from the Late Cretaceous Hateg Basin of Romania. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 56(4). Xing, L.-d., et al. (2017). A mid-Cretaceous enantiornithine (Aves) hatchling preserved in Burmese amber with unusual plumage. Gondwana Research, accepted manuscript. You, H., et al. (2005). A new fossil bird from the Early Cretaceous of Gansu Province, northwestern China. Historical Biology, 17. Zelenkov, N.V. (2017). Early Cretaceous Enantiornithine Birds (Aves, Ornithothoraces) and Establishment of the Ornithuromorpha Morphological Type. Paleontological Journal, Vol.51, Number 6. Zelenkov, N.V. and A.O. Averianov (2015). A historical specimen of enantiornithine bird from the Early Cretaceous of Mongolia representing a new taxon with a specialized neck morphology. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. Clade Euornithes Harrison, C.J.O. and C.A. Walker (1973). Wyleyia: A New Bird Humerus from the Lower Cretaceous of England. Palaeontology, Vol.16, Part 4. Zhou, S., Z.-H. Zhou and J.K. O'Connor (2013). Anatomy of the Basal Ornithuromorph Bird Archaeorhynchus spathula from the Early Cretaceous of Liaoning, China. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 33(1). Zhou, Z. and F.Z.Z. Li (2010). A new Lower Cretaceous bird from China and tooth reduction in early avian evolution. Proc.R.Soc. B, 277. Order Chaoyangiformes O'Connor, J.K. and Z.-H. Zhou (2012). A redescription of Chaoyangia beishanensis (Aves) and a comprehensive phylogeny of Mesozoic birds. Journal of Systematic Paleontology. Subgroup Ornithuromorpha Family Ambiortidae O'Connor, J.K. and N.V. Zelenkov (2013). The Phylogenetic Position of Ambiortus: Comparison with Other Mesozoic Birds from Asia. Paleontological Journal, Vol.47, Number 11. Family Hongshanornithidae Chiappe, L.M., et al. (2014). A new specimen of the Early Cretaceous bird Hongshanornis longicresta: insights into the aerodynamics and diet of a basal ornithuromorph. PeerJ 2: e234. Li, L., J.-Q. Wang and S.-L. Hou (2011). A New Ornithurine Bird (Hongshanornithidae) from the Jiufotang Formation of Chaoyang, Liaoning, China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 49(2). O'Connor, J.K., K-Q Gao, and L.M. Chiappe (2010). A New Ornithuromorph (Aves: Ornithothoraces) Bird from the Jehol Group Indicative of a Higher-Level Diversity. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 30(2). Wang, M, et al. (2015). The oldest record of ornithuromorpha from the early cretaceous of China. Nature Communications, 6:6987. Zheng, X., et al. (2011). Fossil evidence of avian crops from the Early Cretaceous of China. PNAS, Vol.108, Number 38. Zheng, X.-T., et al. (2014). New Information on Hongshanornithidae (Aves: Ornithuromorpha) from a new subadult specimen. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 52(2). Family Songlingornithidae Clarke, J.A., Z. Zhou and F. Zhang (2006). Insight into the evolution of avian flight from a new clade of Early Cretaceous ornithurines from China and the morphology of Yixianornis grabaui. J.Anat., 208. Zheng, Z., et al. (2014). New Specimens of Yanornis Indicate a Piscivorous Diet and Modern Alimentary Canal. PLoS ONE, 9(4). Zhou, Z., et al. (2004). Gastroliths in Yanornis: an indication of the earliest radical diet-switching and gizzard plasticity in the lineage leading to living birds? Naturwissenschaften, 91. Family incertae sedis and General Ornithuromorphs Naish, D., et al. (2012). A gigantic bird from the Upper Cretaceous of Central Asia. Biol.Lett., 8(1). O'Connor, J.K. et al. (2015). Osteohistology of the Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation ornithuromorph (Aves) Iteravis huchzermeyeri. Palaeontologia Electronica, 18.2.38A. Wang, M. and Z. Zhang (2016). A new adult specimen of the basalmost ornithuromorph bird Archaeorhynchus spathula (Aves: Ornithuromorpha) and its implications for early avian ontogeny. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. Wang, Y.-M., et al. (2015). New information on postcranial skeleton of the Early Cretaceous Gansus yumenensis (Aves: Ornithuromorpha). Historical Biology, 28(5). Wang, Y.-M., et al. (2013). Previously Unrecognized Ornithuromorph Bird Diversity in the Early Cretaceous Changma Basin, Gansu Province, Northwestern China. PLoS ONE, Vol..8, Issue 10. You, H-L, et al. (2010). A second Cretaceous ornithuromorph bird from the Changma Basin, Gansu Province, northwestern China. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 55(4). Zhou, S., Z.-H. Zhou and J.K. O'Connor (2013). A new piscivorous ornithuromorph from the Jehol Biota. Historical Biology, 2013. Clade Ornithurae Clarke, J.A. (2004). Morphology, Phylogenetic Taxonomy and Systematics of Ichthyornis and Apatornis (Avialae:Ornithurae).Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Number 286. Clarke, J.A. and L.M. Chiappe (2001). A New Carinate Bird from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia (Argentina). American Museum Novitates, Number 3323. dyke, G.J., et al. (2002). Europe's last Mesozoic bird. Naturwissenschaften (Short Communication). Gingerich, P.D. (1971). A New Partial Mandible of Ichthyornis. The Condor. Gregory, J.T. (1952). The Jaws of the Cretaceous Toothed Birds, Ichthyornis and Hesperornis. The Condor, Vol.54, Number 2. Li, Y., et al. (2011). New Material of Gansus and a Discussion on its Habit. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 49(4). McClachlan, S.M.S., G.W. Kaiser and N.R. Longrich (2017). Maaqwi cascadensis: A large marine diving bird (Avialae: Ornithurae) from the Upper Cretaceous of British Columbia, Canada. PLoS ONE, 12(12). Olson, S.L. (1975). Ichthyornis in the Cretaceous of Alabama. The Wilson Bulletin, Vol.87, Number 1. Porras-Múzquiz, H.G., S. Chatterjee and T.M. Lehman (2014). The carinate bird Ichthyornis from the Upper Cretaceous of Mexico. Cretaceous Research, 51. Shimada, T.R. and L.E. Wilson (2016). A new specimen of the Late Cretaceous bird, cf. Ichthyornis sp. from the Cenomanian of central Kansas, with comments on the size distribution of Ichthyornis in North America. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science, Vol.119, Number 2. Zelenkov, N.V., A.O. Averianov and E.V. Popov (2017). An Ichthyornis-like bird from the earliest Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) of European Russia. Cretaceous Research, 75. Zhou, S., Z.-H. Zhou and J. K. O'Connor (2012). A New Basal Beaked Ornithurine Bird from the Lower Cretaceous of Western Liaoning,China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 50(1). Zhou, Z.-H., F.-C. Zhang and Z.-H. Li (2009). A New Basal Ornithurine Bird (Jianchangornis microdonta Gen. et Sp.Nov.) from the Lower Cretaceous of China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 47(4). Subclass Hesperornithes Bell, A. and L.M. Chiappe (2015). A species-level phylogeny of the Cretaceous Hesperornithiformes (Aves: Ornithuromorpha) : implications for body size evolution amongst the earliest diving birds. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. Bell, A. and M.J. Everhart (2009). A new specimen of Parahesperornis (Aves: Hesperornithiformes) from the Smoky Hill Chalk (Early Campanian) of western Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science, Vol.112, Numbers 1/2. Buhler, P., et al. (1988). Cranial Kinesis in the Late Cretaceous Birds Hesperornis and Parahesperornis.The Auk, 105. Bryant, L.J. (1983). Hesperornis in Alaska. PaleoBios, Number 40. Davis, L.C. and K. Harris (1997). Discovery of Fossil Cretaceous Bird in Southwest Arkansas. Journal of the Arkansas Academy of Science, Vol.51. Eizanowski, A. (1991). New Observations on the Skull of Hesperornis with Reconstructions of the Bony Palate and Otic Region. Peabody Museum of Natural History, Postilla Number 207. Everhart, M.J. (2011). Rediscovery of the Hesperornis regalis Marsh, 1871 holotype locality indicates an earlier stratigraphic occurrence. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science, Vol.114, Numbers 1/2. Everhart, M.J. and A. Bell (2009). A Hesperornithiform Limb Bone from the Basal Greenhorn Formation (Late Cretaceous; Middle Cenomanian) of North Central Kansas. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 29(3). Gregory, J.T. (1952). The Jaws of the Cretaceous Toothed Birds, Ichthyornis and Hesperornis. The Condor, Vol.54, Number 2. Hou, L.-H. (1999). New Hesperornithid (Aves) from the Canadian Arctic. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 37(3). Houde, P. (1987). Histological Evidence for the Systematic Position of Hesperornis (Odontornithes: Hesperornithiformes). The Auk - Short Communications, Vol.104. Martin, J.E. and D.W. Varner (1992). The Occurrence of Hesperornis in the Late Cretaceous Niobrara Formation of South Dakota. Proc.S.D.Acad.Sci., Vol.71. Martin, L.D. and V.L. Naples (2008). Mandibular kinesis in Hesperornis. Oryctos, Vol.7. Panteleyev, A.V., E.V. Popov, and A.O. Averianov (2004). New record of Hesperornis rossicus (Aves, Hesperornithiformes) in the Campanian of Saratov Province, Russia. Paleontological Research, Vol.8, Number 2. Shufeldt, R.W. (1915). The Fossil Remains of a Species of Hesperornis Found in Montana. The Auk, Vol.XXXII. Tanaka, T., et al. (2017). The oldest Asian hesperornithiform from the Upper Cretaceous of Japan, and the phylogenetic reassessment of Hesperornithiformes. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, 2017. Williston, S.W. (1896). On the Dermal Covering of Hesperornis. Kansas University Quarterly, 5(1). Wilson, L.E. and K. Chin (2014). Comparative osteohistology of Hesperornis with reference to pygoscelid penguins: the effects of climate and behaviour on avian bone microstructure. R.Soc. open sci., 1. Zelenkov, N.V., A.V. Panteleyev and A.A. Yarkov (2017). New Finds of Hesperornithids in the European Russia, with Comments on the Systematics of Eurasian Hesperornithidae. Paleontological Journal, Vol.51, Number 5. Clade Avialae O'Connor, J.K., et al. (2014). The histology of two female Early Cretaceous birds. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 52(1). O'Connor, J.K., et al. (2014). Unique caudal plumage of Jeholornis and complex tail evolution in early birds. PNAS, Early Edition. O'Connor, J.K., et al. (2011). A new species of Jeholornis with complete caudal integument. Historical Biology. Zhou, Z. and F. Zhang (2003). Jeholornis compared to Archaeopteryx, with a new understanding of the earliest avian evolution. Naturwissenschaften, 90. Family Archaeopterygidae Alonso, P.D., et al. (2004). The avian nature of the brain and inner ear of Archaeopteryx. Nature, Vol.430. Bergmann, U., et al. (2010). Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Synchrotron Imaging. PNAS. Burgers, P. and L.M. Chiappe (1999). The wing of Archaeopteryx as a primary thrust generator. Nature, Vol.399. Carney, R.M., et al. (2012). New evidence on the colour and nature of the isolated Archaeopteryx feather. Nature Communications, xx(xxxx). Chatterjee, S. and R.J. Templin (2003). The flight of Archaeopteryx. Naturwissenschaften, 90, Short Communication. Christiansen, P. and N. Bonde (2004). Body plumage in Archaeopteryx: a review, and new evidence from the Berlin specimen. C.R. Palevol, 3. Elzanowski, A. (2001). A new genus and species for the largest specimen of Archaeopteryx. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 46(4). Erickson, G.M., et al. (2009). Was Dinosaurian Physiology Inherited by Birds? Reconciling Slow Growth in Archaeopteryx. PLoS ONE, 4(10). (read on-line or download from site) Hecht, M.K. and S. Tarsitano (1983). Archaeopteryx and its Palaeoecology. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, Vol.28, Numbers 1-2. Houck, M.A., J.A. Gauthier and R.E. Strauss (1990). Allometric Scaling in the Earliest Fossil Bird, Archaeopteryx lithographica. Science, Reprint Series, Vol.247. Ji, Q. and S. Ji (1997). A Chinese archaeopterygian, Protarchaeopteryx gen.nov. Geological Science and Technology (Di Zhi Ke Ji), Vol.238. Lee, M.S.Y. and T.H. Worthy (2012). Likelihood reinstates Archaeopteryx as a primitive bird. Biol.Lett., (2012) 8. Longrich, N.R., et al. (2012). Primitive Wing Feather Arrangement in Archaeopteryx lithographica and Anchiornis huxleyi. Current Biology, 22. Martin, L.D. and J.-D. Lim (2005). Soft body impression of the hand in Archaeopteryx. Current Science, Vol.89, Number 7. Mayr, G., B. Pohl, and D.S. Peters (2005). A Well-Preserved Archaeopteryx Specimen with Theropod Features. Science, Vol.310. Nudds, R.L. (2014). Reassessment of the Wing Feathers of Archaeopteryx lithographica Suggest No Robust Evidence for the Presence of Elongated Dorsal Wing Coverts. PLoS ONE, 9(4). Olson, S.L. and A. Feduccia (1979). Flight capability and the pectoral girdle of Archaeopteryx. Nature, Vol.278, Number 5701. Rauhut, O.W.M., C. Foth and H. Tischlinger (2018). The oldest Archaeopteryx (Theropoda: Avialae): a new specimen from the Kimmeridgian/Tithonian boundary of Schamhaupten, Bavaria. PeerJ, 6:e4191. (21.7MB) Speakman, J.R. (1993). Flight Capabilities in Archaeopteryx. Evolution, Vol.47, Number 1. Clade Euavialae Clade Avebrevicauda Family Omnivoropterygidae Pomeroy, D.I. (2013). A Morphological and Taxonomic Revision of the Early Cretaceous Sapeornithdae (Aves: Pygostylia) of Liaoning Province, China. Masters Thesis - California State University, Long Beach. Provini, P., Z.-H. Zhou and F.-C. Zhang (2009). A New Species of the Basal Bird Sapeornis from the Early Cretaceous of Liaoning, China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 47(3). Zheng, X., et al. (2014). On the absence of sternal elements in Anchiornis (Paraves) and Sapeornis (Aves) and the complex early evolution of the avian sternum. PNAS, Vol.111, Number 38. Zheng, X., et al. (2011). Fossil evidence of avian crops from the Early Cretaceous of China. PNAS, Vol.108, Number 38. Zhou, Z and F. Zhang (2003). Anatomy of the primitive bird Sapeornis chaoyangensis from the Early Cretaceous of Liaoning, China. Can.J. Earth Sci., Vol.40. Family Confuciusornithidae Chiappe, L.M., et al. (1999). Anatomy and Systematics of of the Confuciusornithidae (Therapoda: Aves) from the Late Mesozoic of Northeastern China.Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Number 242. Dalsatt, J., et al. (2006). Food remains in Confuciusornis sanctus suggest a fish diet. Naturwissenschaften, 93. Elzanowski, A., D.S. Peters and G. Mayr (2018). Cranial Morphology of the Early Cretaceous Bird Confuciusornis. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, e1439832. Hou, L. and Z.-H. Zhou (1995). Confuciusornis sanctus, a new Late Jurassic sauriurine bird from China. Chinese Science Bulletin, Vol.40, Number 18. Martin, L.D., et al. (1998). Confuciusornis sanctus compared to Archaeopteryx lithgraphica, Naturwissenschaften, 85. Navalon, G., et al. (2018). Diversity and evolution of the Confuciusornithidae: Evidence from a new 131-million-year-old specimen from the Huajiying Formation in NE China. Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, 152. Zhang, F., L. Hou and L. Ouyang (1998). Osteological Microstructure of Confuciusornis: Preliminary Report. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 36(2). Zhang, F., Z.-H. Zhou and M.J. Benton (2008). A primitive confuciusornithid bird from China and its implications for early avian flight. Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences, Vol.51, Number 5. Zheng, X., et al. (2017). Exceptional preservation of soft tissue in a new specimen of Eoconfuciusornis and its biological implications. National Science Review, 4. Zhou, Z. and L. Hou (1998). Confuciusornis and the Early Evolution of Birds. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 36(2). General Basal Birds Wang, M. and G.T. Lloyd (2016). Rates of morphological evolution are heterogeneous in Early Cretaceous birds. Proc.R.Soc. B, 283. Wang, M., et al. (2016). A new basal bird from China with implications for morphological diversity in early birds. Scientific Reports, 6:19700.
×