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Found 227 results

  1. In short, I'm trying to figure out exactly what was on the menu: fish or cephalopods. While sorting through some Oxford Clay fish coprolites, I came across this specimen. It was part of a batch purchased years ago. I must have just assumed the inclusions were fish vertebrae, but now I'm not too sure. I know some vertebrae from some fish fry can be hollow, but the texture/material of these inclusions look very different from anything I've seen (including vertebrae in Oxford Clay coprolites). Because of the color and layers, I'm thinking these may be chitinous. That said, I haven't seen enough fossilized chitinous material to be sure. The only thing I've seen are cephalopod hooks in coprolite (tiny and thin with no layers) and Arthropleura tergites (note layered because they weren't exposed to digestion?). I know back in the early 1800's, William Buckland thought some of the rings found in Blue Lias coprolites could be rings from the suckers of cephalopods, but acknowledged fish vertebrae should not be ruled out (On the Discovery of Coprolites, or Fossil Faeces, in the Lias at Lyme Regis, and in other Formations - Page 226). I have a number of specimens with that type of ring, but they are smaller and fossilization/mineralization isn't the same. So here are my questions: 1. Does anyone out there have any examples of beefy chitinous inclusions in coprolite? 2. Is there a quick test for chitin? 3. Has anyone seen vertebrae that look like these? 4. Has anyone seen fossilized rings from cephalopod suckers? Some extant squid have these, but their rings have little teeth/serrations on them. 5. Any other ideas what these could be? As always, thanks for looking! @MarcoSr, @DE&i, @Carl
  2. An absolute monster of a jaw section I recently prepped from the Yorkshire coast. Only a partial so shows how big it would have been. This is actually part of another block I’m currently working on, containing another section of jaw along with a tonne of other bone from the beast. There’s also a neural arch from a vertebrae sat in there too. The bigger block is not far off finished so I will post that once acid treatment is finished. Thanks for looking
  3. Teeth Everywhere

    Good afternoon everyone! Hit the beach this morning, big tides and strong winds had done a grand job of scouring out the cliffs and teeth littered the beach. The majority were Isurus, one baby Meg, few broken Otodus Obliquus and one Carcharodon Carcharias (showing faint striations) being the stand out teeth. Also found a couple of fish vertebrae and some ray plate chunks. One unknown tooth, any ideas on this one? It is a lot broader than the usual Isurus. Few photos of the beach showing the red crag cliffs with underlying London Clay. Broken WW2 pillbox lying on the beach. 3 years ago that was where the edge of the cliffs were! Thanks for reading everyone!
  4. Please help with some clues

    Hello, I found this inside a loose chalk boulder on the Eastbourne shore. Based on the colour of the chalk it appeared to be from the upper cliff levels, perhaps cretaceous levels.
  5. Hi guys. It's been a while as always when it comes to posting on here. Plenty of reason, too long to go into. I hope everybody is doing as well as they can be during this pandemic. Now onto the good stuff. A while back, I posted my phylloceras in a sorry state of affairs, sections missing everywhere, cracks everywhere. Basically it didn't look fantastic. You'll be able to find it somewhere on here from previous posts. Well, lockdown happened here in the uk, which means there was only one thing to do during this time, and that was to get to work in the workshop and finish a lot of stuff. This was was number one priority as I had been putting it off for so long. And here it is All the cracks we're filled in and painted up, there is a small section on the bottom that has been done and finished since I took this photo. There was a section of the outer whorl that had blown out and was none existent, and replaced by shale, probably some form of gas build up happened inside it and blew it out and destroying it. I then had to make a choice of rebuilding it, or figuring something else out. I decided to go against rebuilding, due to lack of experience and the fact it was such a large section, it probably wouldn't have looked quite right. Luckily, I have plenty of dactylioceras specimens of all shapes and sizes, and decided to filll the section with these, you do find these ammonites washed into the mouth borders of pyllos, so iv stuck with what would be there. I don't even know how many hours went into this any more, but it was a lot, and its definitely something that has forced me to improve as a preperator. I'm currently building a metal stand for it, as it weighs a fair amount and no plastic stand will hold it. It now finally sits proudly in my collection and probably always will I hope you all enjoy my work, and i'll be posting more regularly from now on due to a second lockdown in the uk. I actually have a rather large crocodile block i'm working on currently, including a rostrum, vertebrae ribs, teeth etc, theres a lot going on and it'll probably take a long time to complete due to the size and the fact that the majority of the work will involve using acid to remove everythign, either way, it'll certainly be a stunning piece once complete. Oh, and a rather large icthyosaur block measuring over two foot. (yes i have my work cut out for me haha) Thanks. Dan
  6. Retrospect Ammonite

    Parkinsonia parkinsoni (ammonite) Jurassic, Upper inferior Oolite Bridport Dorset. UK 6.5" The first photos I took a few years ago did nothing for this unique specimen. I found it difficult capturing the details and still think they could be better. The ammonite has many chambers preserved in calcite that glow when backlit. Calcite crystals can be seen growing inside some of the empty chambers. Fossil, mineral, crystals, art, science, love Happy collecting.
  7. Lyme Regis Brachiopods

    While looking at one of the shells in my collection that i had originally thought was a bivalve, from the stretch of beach between Lyme Regis and Charmouth, in Dorset (UK), another glance made me realize it is in fact a brachiopod: symmetry in plan view, asymmetrically sized valves in lateral view. So i dug out my British Mesozoic Fossils book and have identified it confidently as Cincta numismalis, which the book lists as occurring within the "Jamesoni Zone" of the Lower Lias at Radstock in Somerset. I am not familiar with the brachiopods of the Lower Lias at Lyme Regis in Dorset, but a quick search online using Fossilworks and plain google failed to show any other occurrences of this species from Lyme Regis. Do any of the Lias collecters here know if this is a common/widespread brachiopod taxon in both Somerset and Dorset?
  8. By measuring tooth growth rings and bone blood vessels in small Jurassic mammal fossils, scientists determined that small mammals lived for 9 to 14 years back then while similarly sized mammals today would live for 1 to 3 years. https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2020/10/12/world/mammal-teeth-reptile-intl-scli-scn-gbr/index.html
  9. Storm Alex Finds

    After storm Alex hit this weekend, went out for an hour this morning to a deserted beach. Waves have been pushing against the cliffs and a few fresh falls are evident. First find was a partial Meg chunk. With a little bit of enamel left. Picked up a nice isurus by the fresh fall along with an Otodus tip. Lastly and without doubt the find of the day was this what I think is a Carcharodon Hastalis. 62mm making it the largest one I’ve found. It has some wonderful blue colours to it that the photos don’t show to well. Thanks for reading everyone!
  10. Here's a recent fossil hunt that I recorded, feel free to watch it if you're interested. There is an added bonus of a sunrise too
  11. Deer?

    I have here a tooth meant to be from a fallow deer, found in St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England. It's 29 mm x 21 mm. While I don't necessarily doubt the ID, I'm looking to age it which may be a bit harder. The seller claims it's from the Holocene, but it "looks" fossilized to me. This will of course be easier to determine once I have it in hand. I'm curious, though, and wonder if anyone here can tell based on the information I've provided. My question then is dual. Would fallow deer be an accurate ID, or might it be a related find like red deer? And might this be Pleistocene as opposed to Holocene, based on the locality and/or appearance? Thank you, Bellamy
  12. Hi again, I’ve just posted my first find, and here is another I would like help with please. Found on the Isle of Wight Jurassic coast, grey coloured rock around 8cm in length, with what looks like some fish bone type markings. On the reverse side of the same rock is a round light grey circle about 1cm across with a thin white circle surrounding it. Please can anyone help with more information... thanks!
  13. Jurassic Coast ID please...

    Hi, first time fossil hunter here - so apologies in advance! Currently visiting the Isle of Wight Jurassic Coast and spent the day at the beach and have a couple of interesting finds - just not sure if what I found is actually anything more than just a pretty rock! So, this first one is about 11cm in length and had a sort of white slightly porous texture, with yellow brown markings. One marking has the texture of tiny bumps, whilst the other looks like smoother ridges. Can anyone please help?
  14. Could this be amber?

    I found this on Charmouth beach (west) UK, last week on the shoreline. It weighs 57 grams. It has a dark appearance but glows orange when backlit by bright light. Any identification ideas would be appreciated Thanks!
  15. Here is a video i just uploaded of some of my very recent finds from the Yorkshire Coast. These finds are all unprepared currently and in the video showed as found. They will be completed very soon and should come out lovely The best finds are the articulated string of verts, and very nice looking section of Ichthyosaur Paddle. Hopefully you enjoy.
  16. Article - William Buckland's Coprolite Table PDF file - William Buckland’s Coprolite Table By Richard Bull 2nd edition Werrett, B. 2011. Conservation of the Buckland Fossil Table housed at Lyme Regis Museum. The Geological Curator 9 (5): 301 - 304. Duffin, C.J., 2009. "Records of warfare… embalmed in the everlasting hills": a history of early coprolite research. Mercian geologist, 17(2), pp.101-111 Ford, T.D. and O’Connor, B., 2009. A vanished industry: Coprolite mining. Mercian Geologist, 17(2), pp.93-100. Yours, Paul H.
  17. Weekends finds

    Hello all. Put in quite a few hours over the weekend in between fishing sessions. A few teeth but nothing amazing, even the locals are all struggling. Need a big storm to bring a bit more of the cliff down.
  18. Unknown Red Crag tooth

    Hello all, Found this yesterday at Bawdsey, Suffolk. From the red crag bed 3.3-2.5 MYA. Any ideas on what species it’s from? Never found one this “chunky”.
  19. saber tooth ?

    Hi we found this in the spoil heap from sand clay flint mix dug from on top of a thick layer of boulder clay at about 1.5m in a shallow valley in north suffolk about 12 miles inland it has a clockwise twist I am hoping it is a tiger tooth but am prepared to be disappointed
  20. second find from pond no.2

    Hi We have found a second item from a pond dig in chalky clay at about 1.75m seems similar to the last find but the material is much more soft and chalky to the touch any ideas would be very gratefully received Thanks in advance Brian
  21. second find

    We found this in a pond we have dug on the site of an old pond at the juncture between the clay infill and the undisturbed clay under the old pond. depth 1.75m. Heavy clay with flint and chalk in it location Suffolk on boulder clay in the bottom of a very shallow valley I thought it was man made as it was so detailed but my my son and friend think it is a fossil so here are the pictures against a ruler showing inches and centimeters
  22. found our first fossil but need help

    Hi all Very new to this but we found this in Suffolk England in a shallow valley under 1.5 meters of sand and flint in the top 200mm of a deep layer of grey clay with some chalk and flint in it. on its own
  23. Small but perfectly formed

    I live in Thanet, England - classic White Cliffs country, chalky and flinty. Found this amongst the gravel in my driveway, so may be local, might not. Centimetre rule, so about 3 cm by 2 cm by 2cm.
  24. Help to identify please

    I found this years ago on a school trip on the Isle of Wight, the fossil hunter on our day out wanted to buy it off me, but being a kid I didn’t want to sell it, I was just wondering if anyone could tell me what it is? Also, if it’s worth anything? as he was keen to have it, many thanks, Hannah
  25. Suffolk Sharks Teeth Trip

    Hello all! Took the hounds down the local beach for a walk and thought I’d have a quick look for teeth as I was there. Sea was nice and rough with the wind coming off it pushing the waves against the cliff. Straight away I was finding lots of Isurus teeth on the tide line which had derived from the Red Crag. They often have lovely markings that look like white lightning and really are quiet pretty. Got one nice Carcharodon tooth at just under 50mm which is a nice size here. Few more bits n bobs and by that time the dogs were bored so we finished our walkies and went home! Thanks for reading!
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