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Found 141 results

  1. Death near the shoreline, not life on land December 13, 2018, Geological Society of America https://phys.org/news/2018-12-death-shoreline-life.html https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-12/gsoa-dnt121318.php Shillito, Anthony P. and Davies, Neil S. (2018) Death near the Shoreline, not Life on Land: Ordovician Arthropod Trackways in the Borrowdale Volcanic Group, UK. Geology. ISSN 0091-7613, 1943-2682 https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/gsa/geology/article/47/1/55/567352/Death-near-the-shoreline-not-life-on-land GSA Data Repository 2019022 https://www.geosociety.org/datarepository/2019/2019022.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  2. Hi all! Have been out the past couple of weekends to my local sharks teeth spot - Bawdsey in Suffolk, the first three trips i spent on the first area of the beach directly below the red crag cliffs. Found a few but none of really any quality. Best one was a very pretty patterned Carcharocles auriculatus ? (Can anyone confirm?) seen in the first photo top left, and a very worn large tooth (seen in the second photo, looks a bit Meggy?) - I have no idea about species on this one! As well as the usual Carcharias hopei and Striatolamia macrota, a couple of fish verts, some seed pods and ray teeth. Had my most productive day ever yesterday though, after not finding to many previously in my usual spots, went to a spot slightly further along and ended up with 156 teeth in about two hours!! None that were out of the ordinary however just the usual species. Some kid on the beach who was also searching had a perfect Otodus, it must have been nearly 3 inches long!! I was rather jealous of him! Can anyone ID the larger tooth that is bottom left? Still after the 6 inch Meg from this spot! Thanks for reading!!!
  3. Dear TFF Members, today this piece arrived from a seller, who unfortunately didn't know either the correct ID of the fossils, or the age - the only thing he knew in respect of the specimen was that it comes from the South of England. He suggested it's a water worm, but I would like a more precise ID. On the front of the rock - apart from the potential "worm" - there are also numerous trilobite tails. And on the back - an imprint of a snail? ammonite? , two parts of something that looks like shell and a chain of something? Absolutely no idea, what it could be . Please help me Front of specimen: With a flash: Close-ups of trilobites' tails:
  4. Bawdsey Trip - Tooth ID??

    Headed down to Bawdsey in Suffolk for a few hours. The beach has built up loads covering up the best big teeth grounds, still managed to find a few. Got the Striatolamia macrotas from the bottom of the shingle ridge and also a fish vertebra? (Can anyone confirm). The rest of the teeth were all from the red crag layer. Also found a possible cow shark tooth which i have never found! (Please say it is!!!) And some other fossil, i have found a lot of these previously but never as large. Apologies i cant take any better photos due to using my phone! If anyone can help with identifying these that would be marvellous! Thanks for reading guys and girls!
  5. I saw this nuthetes destructor tooth for sale from England. I thought it was incredibly rare until I saw some from France. My book tells me only pieces of jaw bone and isolated teeth have been found. My book also tells me that they are found in southern England. Is my book out of date or are the French ones not actually nuthetes destructor? Or is it just the English ones that are rare?
  6. Isle of Sheppey

    Today I am heading out for the first time to investigate the Miocene of England, previously I had only hunted the Jurassic I am going to the isle of sheppey and later today I will post the results of my trip
  7. Thought this would be an interesting one for anybody overseas, who has never heard of Yorkshire’s Golden Cannonballs. Theyre only found in the UK along the Yorkshire coastline. With a 1/15 chance of having something inside, it’s safe to say they can be quite rare, and are always sought after. More often than not, they either contain one, or multiples of Eleganticeras ammonites inside. I’ll never tire of finding them. Theyre found in the shake jet rocks, and take hours to polish up the iron pyrite to give them their golden glow of you like. Here’s one I recently prepared.
  8. Baryonyx vertebra?

    Hello, I’m wondering if this is actually a Baryonyx vertebra. It was found in Wealden formation, Sussex England.
  9. English Mammoth

    Headed up to Walcott in Norfolk Saturday just gone, got there nice and early to beat the crowds, luckily the cold weather had put a lot of people off! Anyway, walked off towards Happisburgh and headed down below the sea defences, was soon finding small pieces of bone but nothing of any major interest, when suddenly i spotted it, up against the sea wall, standing out like a sore thumb, a tooth fragment! I quickly grabbed my prize and gazed in awe at it. I have travelled many miles searching for one of these and now i held one in my hands. I stowed my price in my bag and continued on my way, skipping along the beach until i reached the next groyne, walking up to the corner where you are able to pull yourself up the wall i froze. In front of me, laying on the sand, another one, bigger, better and mine. I couldn't believe it, two in one day! Pure ecstasy filled my veins. The markings on this one were incredible. I continued down to Happisburgh with my bag now considerably heavier (for once). Upon reaching it i could see a lot of other people searching the beach there so i decided to walk back the way i came but search on the tide line now as it was nearly dead low. i walked and waded down the beach until i got to around the halfway mark, i was on the phone at the time to a friend telling him about my day (gloating) and i wasn't really paying much attention so much so i nearly stood on it, looking down, with waves washing over it was another, this one was half buried in the sand so i dug it out like a madman and soon held my prize, this one had been rolled by the waves more so and had been worn down a bit. I carefully packed this one away and walked back to my car. I met a few other hunters on the way with kids who were most impressed by my finds. Now i have no idea of species on these, other than the fragment and second one being Mammoth and someone suggested the last one could be a straight tusked elephant, if anyone could expand my knowledge that would be great! This is my super serious fossil hunting face. It may surprise you but i am filled with joy inside. Thanks for taking the time to read this!
  10. Suffolk Tooth ID?

    Hi Guys and Girls. Going through some of my old teeth on the weekend and found the one below. Any ideas on what it is? Doesn't look like any shark tooth i have ever found from my usual sites. Thinking possibly fish? It is around 13mm long. Out of the thousands i have found over the years none are like this. Unfortunately, i am unsure of exactly where i got it, but would have been either the Rocks at Ramsholt (London Clay and Red Crag) or Bawdsey (London Clay and Red Crag) as these were the only two places i used to collect from. Have also included what i think is a Cosmopolitodus hastalis/ Carcharodon hastalis that i found a few months back at Bawdsey. If Mods want to edit photos to make brighter etc please do!! Thanks!!!!
  11. Lyme regis vs Charmouth

    Some of you have probably heard of Lyme Regis in Dorset but less of you have heard of Charmouth(the coastline east of Lyme Regis). This topic will cover which one is better for fossil hunting. In Charmouth the common fossils are fools gold ammonites(which can be picked up just by walking along the beach),belemnites, beef rock ammonites, coprolites(most unidentifiable), random marine reptile bone fragments(usually ichthyosaur). The rarer Charmouth fossils are complete marine reptile bones. The incredibly rare fossils are Scelidosaurus(a primitive armoured dinosaur) bones. In Lyme regis the remains are almost the same but no Scelidosaurus and instead there is a possible species of Megalosaurus and rare sea urchins(these might also be in Charmouth). Unlike Charmouth the "common fossils" are not so common. My opinion is that Charmouth is better. But I am interested to hear other opinions. PS- Sorry for the lack of pictures and the large amount of brackets.
  12. English Ammonite

    Hello there, i usually dont buy fossils. What interested me is what i find basically. Nevertheless i acquired a batch of fossils during autumn, mostly tertiary shells ( i knew the seller and was ##### to see it leave a good home. There were also a few ammonites. Amongst those, there was this one labelled as "dactiloceras, england, jurassic" I assume that this is Dactyloceras from Whitby. Could someone confirm that ? Could it be possible to narrow it to specie? D commune ? And last what is the precise era ? Toarcian? Regards
  13. Is this a fossil?

    Found on a Southern England beach on our Honeymoon, just wondered what it was?
  14. I found this one at the Jurassic Coast along side some other fossils. The fossil is about 2.5 cm wide and is heavier than it looks (tried a magnet but it had no effect on it). The second picture is a close up of a crack at the side (top right on the first picture), from what i could make out it looked like pyrite which is most likely becuase i also found a pyritised ammonite on the same beach. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
  15. Baryonyx walkeri

    From the album Dinosaur teeth

    Baryonyx walkeri Wessex Formation Brook Bay, Isle of Wight, England
  16. possible egg?

    came across this on my travels and just wondered if anyone can shed more light on it? found on the north east coast of england. the 'egg' is about the size of a golf ball
  17. I was just wondering as I collect most of my fossils in Dorset and that is very far away so I rarely get to go
  18. Anthracothere Tooth (found 2014)

    From the album Fossils From Bouldnor, Isle of Wight

    Tooth from an anthracothere, probably Bothriodon or Elomeryx. Collected on the coastline at Bouldnor on the Isle of Wight in the UK. Upper Hamstead Member of the Bouldnor Formation (approx. 32 Ma)
  19. Anthracothere Tooth (found 2014)

    From the album Fossils From Bouldnor, Isle of Wight

    Tooth from an anthracothere, probably Bothriodon or Elomeryx. Collected on the coastline at Bouldnor on the Isle of Wight in the UK. Upper Hamstead Member of the Bouldnor Formation (approx. 32 Ma)
  20. Bothriodon Jaw (found 2014)

    From the album Fossils From Bouldnor, Isle of Wight

    A large fragment of mammalian jaw belonging to the anthracotheriid Bothriodon. Collected on the coastline at Bouldnor on the Isle of Wight in the UK. Upper Hamstead Member of the Bouldnor Formation (approx. 32 Ma)
  21. From the album Fossils From Lyme Regis And Charmouth

    Collected between Lyme Regis and Charmouth in Dorset, England. Charmouth Mudstone Formation. About 195-190 Ma.
  22. Ichthyosaur Jaw Fragment with Teeth (found 2017)

    From the album Fossils From Lyme Regis And Charmouth

    Collected between Lyme Regis and Charmouth in Dorset, England. Charmouth Mudstone Formation. About 195-190 Ma.
  23. Plesiosaur Vertebra (found 2017)

    From the album Fossils From Lyme Regis And Charmouth

    Collected between Lyme Regis and Charmouth in Dorset, England. Charmouth Mudstone Formation. About 195-190 Ma.
  24. Articulated Ichthyosaur Vertebrae (found 2014)

    From the album Fossils From Lyme Regis And Charmouth

    Collected from Monmouth Beach in Dorset, England. Blue Lias Formation. About 200 Ma.
  25. Ichthyosaur Jaw Fragment (found 2014)

    From the album Fossils From Lyme Regis And Charmouth

    Collected between Lyme Regis and Charmouth in Dorset, England. Charmouth Mudstone Formation. About 195-190 Ma.
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