Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'england'.

More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents


  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • The Crimson Creek
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles


  • Calendar


  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Bony Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 77 results

  1. belemnite battlefield?

    Funny story with this one, these are from a hunt from about a year ago. I put my bag in the washer and when taking it out this fell out. Lucky it survived after a wash. These are very small ones if they are belemnites.
  2. Hello all! I am planning a trip to Dorset in the near future, and have decided on 3 locations: Charmouth, Seatown, and Lyme Regis. May I ask, what tools should I get to help me with splitting nodules, rocks, etc? Besides, any info on what time of the year to go to these locations, as well as some tide information (I heard after a high tide is the best time to collect as the waves wash out the fossils) As well as, any idea how much competition will be there? I hope I don't leave empty handed...
  3. Crocodilian Bone ID?

    This small crocodilian fossil was collected on the beach at Bouldnor on the Isle of Wight in southern England. It comes from the Bouldnor Formation and is about 33 million years old. I'm certain it is crocodilian (from the small aligatorid Diplocynodon) based on the distinctive pitted texture. Scutes and vertebrae from this small croc are fairly common finds on this coastline. However this particular piece has stumped me, it is 3D and hollow on the inside, not like any scute i've picked up. I was thinking it must be some sort of skull element but i'd appreciate any help to rectify this! It measures 4 cm long.
  4. G'day all! After three years since my last visit to the UK, i finally returned in December 2017 for another massive collecting trip across England. This was my most ambitious tour of the UK's Mesozoic and Cenozoic vertebrate deposits thus far, with 20 days of collecting across ten different locations. These were (in chronological order from first visit): Abbey Wood in East London Beltinge in Kent Bouldnor on the Isle of Wight Compton Bay to Grange Chine on the Isle of Wight Lyme Regis to Charmouth in Dorset Aust Cliff in Gloucestershire Saltwick Bay in Yorkshire Kings dyke in Cambridgeshire Minster in Kent Tankerton in Kent. If you went collecting at any of these places in the last month, there's probably a 25.6975% chance you saw me looking very intimidating hunched over in my hooded rain jacket and muddy pants 14 of those collecting days were back-to-back, a new record for me, though it was very tiring! Having just come from the hot Australian summer, winter collecting in England was certainly a challenge at times and my fingers and toes froze to the point i could barely feel them on multiple occasions. Temperatures for many of the days reached 0 degrees celcius or below, with ice on the ground around me and even snow falling while i was trying to collect! I also went out during the middle of the night to collect using a head torch on some occasions (mainly at Bouldnor) due to the tidal conditions and bad weather which prevented collecting during the day. All in all i am certainly pleased with how the trip went, i was successful at all locations with the exception of Tankerton. For some of the locations (Aust Cliff, Kings dyke, Saltwick Bay) it was also my first and only visit, so i'm glad i still managed to do well with no prior experience at these sites and with such limited time at each. I have tried to write this trip report not only as a means of showing you guys my finds but also to provide an informative overview of some of the better locations for Mesozoic and Cenozoic vertebrates across England for others who might be planning similar trips. Anyway, here are the results! Pictures will be spread across the next 12 posts due to file size restrictions. Abbey Wood - East London (6/12/17, 30/12/17 and 31/12/17) Formation: Blackheath ('Lesnes Shell Bed') Deposit Age: 54.5 million years (Eocene) Fossil Diversity: Sharks, bony fish, chimaeroids, bivalves, gastropods, rare mammals, turtles and crocodiles This was one of only two inland locations i visited (the other being Kings dyke). As i have found, the majority of the UK's easily accessible fossil collecting locations are coastal! Abbey Wood is an excellent location just 45 minutes on the tube from central London. It is situated in a park called the Lesnes Abbey Woods and there is a small collecting area that is open to the public for shallow digging (see my first two pictures below). You definitely need a sifter, shovel and basin of water at this location to have any real success. Be warned though that once you combine the fine Blackheath sediments with water during sifting you get some pretty gnarly mud so expect to come away from this site looking like you've just been rolling around in the dirt. I'm sure i got some interesting looks from people on the tube going back to London it was all worth it though, as every single sift load produced at least one shark tooth across the three days i visited. Very impressive considering the number of obvious holes dotted around the ground from years worth of other collectors visiting. It should be noted though that the mammalian material from this location is of high scientific importance, and collecting here is allowed on the condition that any mammalian finds be brought to the attention of and handed in to specialists like Dr Jerry hooker at the Natural History Museum in London. I didn't find any such material on my trips unfortunately. Here is the designated collecting area. The statue at the front is of Coryphodon, one of the rare Eocene mammals that has been found at the site. The full haul of shark teeth from three days of sifting in the collecting area. Most are from Striatolamia and Sylvestrilamia. I gave up trying to count them once i got past 100 Some of the other fishy bits that often turn up during sifting, including guitar fish teeth on the far left and two dermal denticles (Hypolophodon sylvestris), one gar pike fish tooth in the middle (Lepisosteus suessionensis), one shark vertebra down the bottom and unidentified bony fish vertebrae on the right. I don't typically collect shells, but i picked these up for the sake of adding a bit more diversity to my Abbey Wood collection. These are bivalves and gastropods of various species. The molluscan diversity from this one location is actually quite impressive. Beltinge - Kent (7/12/17 and 29/12/17) Formation: Upnor ('Beltinge Fish Bed') Deposit Age: 56.5 million years old (Paleocene) Fossil Diversity: Sharks, chimaeroids, bony fish, rays, turtles, crocodiles, bivalves, wood This is my favourite shark tooth collecting location in the UK and probably my favourite that i have visited anywhere so far. The shoreline directly opposite the access point at the end of Reculver Drive in Beltinge is loaded with teeth and dare i say it's impossible to come here and walk away empty handed. The shore however is very flat so there is generally only about a two hour window of time that collecting can be carried out here, one hour either side of low tide. Conditions can also vary depending on how sanded over the shore is, whether the Beltinge Fish Bed itself is exposed and how low the tide drops. However even on a poor day you will still find teeth here, just not as many! I experienced this first hand as the first day i visited on December 7th the conditions were excellent. The tide dropped quite low, there wasn't too much sand covering the clay and the Beltinge Fish Bed was exposed. This allowed direct in-situ collecting of teeth from this rich layer and i ended up with something like 240 teeth from just a couple of hours of looking. The second visit i made on December 29 of the same month was almost the exact opposite. It's amazing how quickly these coastal locations can change! The shore was largely sanded over, the fish bed was covered and the tide didn't drop anywhere near as much. I was out about the same amount of time as the first but only managed 69 teeth (only ). Keep these things in mind if you are planning a visit. Luckily though i didn't just find shark teeth, i also managed to locate some of the other less common finds as you will see below! Here is the area of shoreline that produces teeth, photographed on December 7th. It was quite cold and rainy! Three teeth sitting next to each other as found. More as-found shark teeth. This one made me quite excited when i saw it. It's a large piece of chimaeroid fish jaw and mouthplate coming straight from the Beltinge Fish Bed itself (the darker, dull-green sandy clay in this picture). Beltinge is continued in the next post.
  5. Jurassic Bone Block ID? (Yorkshire, UK)

    Hi all, I recently found this massive bowling ball sized rock at Saltwick Bay near Whitby on the Yorkshire coast (Northern England). It is lower to middle Jurassic, i think about 180-170 million years old (possibly the Whitby Mudstone Formation). As you can see it it's full of various bones, which occur on almost all sides of the rock so they are probably running right through it. Prep for this one is going to be a nightmare i can tell and i don't have the right tools, but for now i really just want to try and figure out what i've got. I think it's fair to assume the bones are associated. The options for this bit of coast are fish (Gyrosteus), ichthyosaur, marine crocodile, plesiosaur or dinosaur. I was hoping based on the cross sectional shapes of some of the bones, and the texture of the bone itself, someone would be able to narrow down what it might be. Fish or reptile would be the first thing to determine. My obvious first assumption was marine reptile, but some of the fish on the Yorkshire coast like Gyrosteus are also huge (5m long) and i'm not very familiar with their bone structure. In this picture, i thought the rectangular bone towards the bottom might be a vertebra in cross-section. If so, from what? Could it be the edge of an ichthyosaur vertebra before it dips down in the centre? This bone is the biggest in the block, about 8 cm long and 3 cm thick. Continued in the next post!
  6. Claw ID Help - Bouldnor Formation, UK

    Collected recently from Bouldnor on the Isle of Wight. It is about 33 million years old (earliest Oligocene). Fossils of turtles, a small alligatorid (Diplocynodon) and land mammals (most commonly anthracotheres) are the usual finds. This is the first ungual i have ever found from this location, and i am having trouble finding images of other examples to compare with. It measures 18mm long. I first thought crocodile when i collected it, but i would like other opinions. I'm now tossing up between mammalian and crocodilian. I understand going further than that will probably not be possible. Cheers!
  7. tooth?

    Hi I bought this pterosaur tooth. On the specimen there are also numerous remains of fish and sharks. But one tooth is different. Did he belong to another reptile or brachiopod?
  8. UK Riker case

    Does anyone know of a good site for Riker cases located in the UK, besides Just In Case? They are not only pricey, but mostly sold out every time I visit their site. Thanks!
  9. County Durham, England - Fish

    Paleoniscum freieslebeni I thought you would like to see a complete fish that was found in 2001 and was donated to a geologist friend of mine for his lectures. Never taking my brother with me again as it was him that uncovered it, lump hammer and bolster chisel, he is 6 foot and has the weight to split the large slab it came out of, after that he panicked and did not know what to do, sis to the rescue. No prepping needed except to cut the block down to size, magnificent blue enamel like scales right down to the tip of its tail. Nose to tail 9 inches with only a few scales missing. Will post some more fish photos from the area later. A jaw with teeth from the same quarry and other complete and nearly complete from one nearby, different year. Watch this space. Enjoy
  10. Hi everyone, i don't know if this is the right section; if it's no, i'm sorry. I want to become a paleontologist, I was suggested to continue my studies at the University of Bristol. Can anybody give me some general information about Bristol or suggest other universities in Europe, where i can continue my studies?
  11. Scientists find fossilised cosmic dust in white cliffs of Dover by Colin Smith, PhysOrg, September 7, 2017 http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandeventspggrp/imperialcollege/newssummary/news_7-9-2017-10-59-59 https://phys.org/news/2017-09-scientists-fossilised-cosmic-white-cliffs.html Martin D. Suttle and Matthew J. Genge, 2017, Diagenetically altered fossil micrometeorites suggest cosmic dust is common the geological record, Earth and Planetary Science Letters. Volume 476, Pages 132-142 DOI: 10.1016/j.epsl.2017.07.0 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0012821X17304399 http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017E%26PSL.476..132S Martin D. Suttle and Matthew J. Genge, 2017, The Diagenesis and Replacement of Cosmic Dust in the Geological Record [#6010] 80th Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society 2017 (LPI Contrib. No. 1987) https://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/metsoc2017/pdf/6010.pdf https://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/metsoc2017/pdf/sess104.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  12. Out hunting today on Whitby Jurassic coast and came across this beauty, measures 10", now I have came across bits n pieces of these in the past but never a complete specimen, does anyone know the name and how would I go about prepping this ? Worth polishing for best results ? Thanks.
  13. Trip to Saltburn

    Took a family trip to Saltburn yesterday, just up from where we normally go (Redcar) and made some discoveries, one of which looks like a nautiloid. I made a video of that last one, the possible nautiloid:
  14. Walton on the Naze

    Is there a certain area I should be looking in or to avoid when looking for fossils at Walton on the Naze? I've never been to the area before so I'm unsure of what to expect, also I'm a complete amateur so it's mainly for fun. I would like to try to come back with something, even if it's small. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
  15. Can someone tell what is this?

    I found this some time ago on the coast of Lyme Regis. Cant identify it. Its like 20 cmt long
  16. Hi all, Out walking today with my wife at Walton on the Naze beach, I stumbled upon my second Otodus tooth in the space of a month. This has to be my best specimen yet and I'm really 'chuffed'! This would have come from the London Clay deposits c53mya I was wondering if it was possible to determine anything about the animal from the one tooth alone, or where in the mouth the the tooth might have come from as it seems much straighter than all the other specimens we have found. Any help would be great. Best wishes, Carl
  17. Fossil for Identification Please

    I found this interesting fossil today while walking along the beach at Seaham on the Durham coastline in North East England and I was wondering if anyone has any idea to what it is. The fossil is on a flint nodule which was picked up from the tideline of the beach. the rock shown is roughly around 40mm by 30mm with the fossil being around 15mm across.
  18. Is this a fossil

    Is this a fossil? I found it on a beach a few years ago, I thought it might be a fossil but I don't know anything about them so wasn't sure.
  19. Scanning a small coprolite from Lyme Regis, UK, I noticed this little button-shaped inclusion. I was just wondering if anyone recognized what this might be. My only guess would be an otolith. Any ideas? I'm tempted to try to remove it to get a good look at the other side. Thanks for looking!
  20. Axophyllum sp.

    A rare genus from this bed, one previous record seen from Cumbria. It is common earlier in the Mississippian of the region. The voids are filled with transparent calcite. This genus has a lonsdaleoid outer dissepimentarium (looking like large bubbles). As is most commonly the case, it was largely removed prior to fossilisation, leaving a trace on one side (see photo 4). The contorted axial region is typical.
  21. Ichthyosaur paddle concretion ?

    Hi guys/gals found this today after an unproductive hunt, possibly an Ichthyosaur paddle cross section concretion, anybody confirm this ? Thanks.
  22. Fenestella plebeia

    A small colony surrounded by Archaeocidaris debris. It shows the obverse side , i.e. the side with pores. It is preserved on the top face of a thin limestone lens that was overlain by shale. This is the most common fenestrate bryozoan in this area but the majority of specimens are found in shale and rarely split to show the obverse as it is the "stickier" side due to the pores.
  23. An unusually complete specimen although crowns are well known from this location. It is an early comatulid (feather star) and has a very short stem consisting of only six or seven columnals, all of which bear cirri. Reference: Simms, M.J. 1989. British Lower Jurassic Crinoids. Monograph of the Palaeontographical Society, London:1-103, pls.1-15 (No. 581) This was Invertebrate/Plant Fossil of the Month March 2015
  24. Bog wood

    From the album WhodamanHD's Fossil collection.

    A small block of bog wood from the fens. Not sure if this is fossil forum material, since it's only 4-6 thousand years old, but it is in the very earliest stages of fossilization. I would at least call it a subfossil. Bought online.