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Found 965 results

  1. An Eocene summer

    It was a busy summer, and now it is snowing. I got out a few times this summer and here is my report for y'all's enjoyment. Most of my outings were into Wyoming's early Eocene. Way back in the spring I went to a newly discovered mammal site. I showed one jaw here: Here is a view of the site. This is the early Eocene Wind River Fm in central WY. (Wasathcian in age). Lots of land to look at out here, and I have only prospected a wee bit of it. My pack is down thereon the flats... let's see if we can find any fossils down there. OH, look... a mammal jaw. And can you find an additional bonus tooth in there? Right next to this there were a group of crocodile bones. Again... find the bones. I dug around quite a bit to try to find the source of these bones and got totally skunked. I usually get out into the Eocene beds of southwest WY on Labor day, but this year it happened a month late, so here are some pix from the first weekend of October. It starts getting cold at this time of year. The first photo is me at an abandoned oil well site where the oil folks had scraped up a limestone layer in their bulldozing. The layer has bones in it... mostly turtle pieces and lots of very small (and practically un-prepable) fish bones. If you break rocks long enough you will find good stuff. Below are a the best things I found on this visit. For those interested, these things are prepped with ye ole air abrasive under the microscope. Dolomite at about 20 psi. There is potential for the air abrasive to abrade the bones and I am not sure if these teeth got overly air abraded or are suffering form Eocene erosion. It is very slow prep, so I don't focus too much on this layer. First a little croc dentary. Note that the bone runs off the edge of the rock. I spent a long time looking for the rock that contains the rest of this jaw... again, skunked. But this is a good little find. The empty roundish area to the right of the jaw is the impression of a snail. fresh water snails of the genus Physa are the most common fossils. This next bone is the angular bone of a small croc. The angular is one of the bones in the lower jaw. The limestone layer is in the Wasatch Formation. After busting up enough rocks, I went to one of my favorite sites about a half mile away. Also in the Wasatch Fm. This layer sits just above the same limestone layer that I collected at the oil well site. Here I am digging. Note the weather is getting nicer; I have jettisoned the coat. This site is full of small randomly distributed fossils. Again, mostly turtle pieces, but also some good croc material and occasional mammal teeth and jaws. And here is a distant view of the quarry. The limestone with bones is seen as an small cliff just below my backpack. So, let's look at a few fossils. First an emerging soft shelled turtle piece ( a costal plate). That is a dental pick for scale. The digging here is best done slowly so you don't break the bones. You can see other pieces of bones in here. The first photo in the next post is the same turtle piece fully exposed.
  2. Massive concretions

    Hello I found this along a small spring fed stream in Gonzales county, Texas. This area has produced plenty of ice age fossils and was home to numerous boiling mud pits which ended in the late 70s due to oil production; not sure how relevant that it haha
  3. Striatolamia macrota (Agassiz 1843)

    From the album Pisces

    12mm. Sand Tiger. Upper Posterior. Eocene Khouribga, Morocco
  4. Striatolamia macrota (Agassiz 1843)

    From the album Pisces

    22mm. Sand Tiger. Lower posterior. Eocene Khouribga, Morocco
  5. Ive been working on a most wonderful crab concretion these last few weeks and finally got to the grinding stage to smooth out the tool marks. While grinding at times I would realize a bad smell? About the 3rd or 4th time I smelled this smell I began to wonder what was going on? and no, I wasn't passing gas, (just to stop any of you funny business type fellows). My guess is sulpher? I noticed when i was prepping this crab that its got a bit of pyrite in it so the rock must too? Right? Has anyone ever experienced this? Can grinding on a rock with sulpher in it produce a bad smell? Its not a big deal but just wondering. RB
  6. First fossil dragonflies from B.C. identified and named Simon Fraser University, November 04, 2019 http://www.sfu.ca/sfunews/stories/2019/11/first-fossil-dragonflies-from-bc-identified-and-named.html Fifty-million-year-old dragonfly species that once flew in B.C. identified for first time. Identifying dragonflies from fossils involves mapping their distinctive wings and comparing the results to species living today. By Kevin Griffen, Vancouver Sun, November 4, 2019 https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/fifty-million-year-old-dragonfly-species-that-once-flew-in-b-c-identified-for-first-time The open access paper is: Archibald, S.B. and Cannings, R.A., 2019. Fossil dragonflies (Odonata: Anisoptera) from the early Eocene Okanagan Highlands, western North America. The Canadian Entomologist, pp.1-34. https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/canadian-entomologist/article/fossil-dragonflies-odonata-anisoptera-from-the-early-eocene-okanagan-highlands-western-north-america/74A59170711807272E35236BA309AC9A Related paper is: Archibald, S.B., Greenwood, D.R., Smith, R.Y., Mathewes, R.W., and Basinger, J.F. 2011a. Great Canadian Lagerstätten 1. Early Eocene Lagerstätten of the Okanagan Highlands (British Columbia and Washington State). Geoscience Canada, 38:155–164. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/262485004_Great_Canadian_Lagerstatten_1_Early_Eocene_Lagerstatten_of_the_Okanagan_Highlands_British_Columbia_and_Washington_State Yours, Paul H.
  7. Thaumaturus intermedius Weitzel 1933

    From the album Vertebrates

    Thaumaturus intermedius Weitzel 1933 Eocene Messel near Darmstadt Germany
  8. I’m posting the nicer Phyllodus pharyngeal plate specimens that I’ve collected over the years from the Eocene Nanjemoy Formation of Virginia because many collectors really never get to see Phyllodus specimens. These mouth plates come from bony fish. I only find a nice specimen every 7 or 8 trips to the Nanjemoy Formation so they are not common. There is a wide variation in the tooth morphologies of these mouth plates. No two mouth plates are identical. The mouth plates are comprised of individual varying sized and shaped teeth and can have up to six layers of replacement teeth. However, White (1931) demonstrated that these variations were merely variants among a broad range of possible intergradational morphologies and Estes (1969) synonymized the previous named species with P. toliapicus. Some specimens still have formation matrix and other debris on them because I don’t clean them in my ultrasonic cleaners like other specimens because individual teeth can dislodge very easily. The below specimens range in size from 7 mm to 22 mm in the longest dimension. Continued in next reply Marco Sr.
  9. What do y'all think these are? They're bits of debris from a slide I was working on. All I can really tell you is that they were photographed at 40X magnification, scale bar 50 microns. This set of slides is across the Paleocene to Eocene, but I unfortunately don't know what rock this single slide sample is from. Sample is from the Hanna Basin in Wyoming.
  10. Fish spine?

    Hi guys any ideas on this?it’s Eocene from the khourigba mine in Morocco
  11. Fossil Tooth for ID

    Hello All, this was found in Micro Matrix from the basal Calvert lag deposit in Central VA. Oligocene, Eocene, and Early Miocene teeth can be found here. About an inch in length, 14/16 in width of root, cusps about 2/16 Maybe @isurus90064 might know this one. Or any of you VA shark tooth experts out there, as I know there are many! Thanks, FA
  12. Cyclurus kehreri Andrae, 1893

    From the album Vertebrates

    Cyclurus kehreri ANDRAE, 1893 Middle Eocene Lutetian Messel near Darmstadt Germany Length 20cm
  13. I scored some nice Eocene fish plates from the Green River formation in Lincoln County Wyoming. Can anyone help me ID these three fish? Any help is greatly appreciated.
  14. Fish story for the ages: High schooler unearths rare fossil by University of Chicago, September 30, 2019 https://news.uchicago.edu/story/fish-story-ages-high-schooler-unearths-rare-fossil https://phys.org/news/2019-09-fish-story-ages-high-schooler.html Yours, Paul H.
  15. I donated 20,000+ Eocene marine Virginia coprolites to the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science in 2015. There have been several formal presentations given on these coprolites to date and a major paper is in final review. To see numerous coprolite pictures and read about/see previous presentations check out the below TFF link: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/50059-what-ate-what/& A copy of the latest poster presentation given on these Virginia coprolites at the GSA Annual Meeting in Phoenix, Arizona, USA on September 22, 2019 is below (If you click on the below picture which will open it in a new window and click on the + symbol twice, you can read the text): Marco Sr.
  16. Ductor vestenae VOLTA, 1796

    From the album Vertebrates

    Ductor vestenae VOLTA, 1796 Eocene Ypresian Monte Bolca near Verona Italy
  17. Barely a month had gone by since my last trip to New Mexico and Colorado, but I already had plans for this trip in the works. Primary focus this time, which was a solo trip, was fossil collecting, visiting well known sites that have been on my radar for quite some time. I flew out to Salt Lake City and drove directly to Kemmerer, WY. My first stop there was Fossil Butte National Monument: Here is a view of the visitors center (free admission) and the surrounding barren, but awesome landscape that surrounds it:
  18. Deep-water trace fossils

    Hello friends! Today I'm seeking your help to identify a few fossils that I've found over the years. They are trace fossils and I collected them in northern Italy, along a creek. They were not in their original setting, but nearby outcrops dated to the Cretaceous or the beginning of the Caenozoic. These deposits were formed by the action of turbidity currents, in deep waters. If you have any idea for the ID, they are more than welcome! Thank you!
  19. ID for this bivalve from Morocco

    Anybody have any idea on the indentification and age for this bivalve? Purchased online ex china (was advertised as from the "Devonian of Yunnan", but is clearly from younger deposits of Morocco). I have found conflicting ages on the net: either Cretaceous or Eocene. Some say from the Dakhla region others from the Essouria region.
  20. I got back from my last fossil hunting trip just 3 days ago. My middle son did all the work but im the one who came home a bit beat up! I was rather tired on this trip but it was still a lot of fun. I stopped by some freinds of mine and bought some more of those agatized Aturia and then stayed with some more friends of mine and did some trading with them. With the few crab concretions we found and the ones I traded for I came home with a few more to prep this winter. Only thing I didnt like about this trip was the rain! and the traffic on I-5 passing Tacoma!!! RB This is at the end of driving aaaaaaaaal day long and having a drink. The rains just started and didnt stop till noon the following day! Here is a crate of crab balls from 2 different sites. A very lovely sight for a crab guy. Here are some crab balls I traded for. The one in plastic, (3 pieces), is the one I'm most excited about. Should be a very large and very nice crab!!! With these 5 Aturia I now have 10. These are one of my most favorite fossil! My youngest son was in eastern Montana while I was in Washington. This is not the best fossil but still purty cool. This looks to have been preditated apon but still makes for a realy cool ammo on concretion!
  21. ?? shark tooth

    Hi friends, can you help me with this? I went to Khrase city, Eocene area , to the east of Riyadh and found many shark teeth but this one is strange . It was a surface find. what could it be?
  22. Carcharias hopei (Agassiz 1843)

    From the album Pisces

    36mm. Eocene From Khouribga, Morocco
  23. Hypotodus robustus (Leriche 1921)

    From the album Pisces

    3cm. Eocene From Khouribga, Morocco
  24. Argentina sphyraena Linnaeus, 1758

    From the album Vertebrates

    Argentina sphyraena Linnaeus, 1758 "lesser argentine" Late Paleocene to Early Eocene Fur Denmark Length 6cm
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