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Found 643 results

  1. Ok, today I did a bunch of work on getting some crab concretions ready for prep. Took me most of the day, but got 7 of them glued up and ready for prep once the glues sets up. Im going to do a step by step for only one crab though. Hope it turns out to be a good one? here are some pics of my work today. The first two pics are of the same crab that I will show the prep process of. RB
  2. Unidentified Testudine Carapace

    Hi, I've recently been sorting through my freshwater turtle pieces from the Bouldnor Fm. and have come across a couple of fragments that don't resemble the normal finds of Emys and Trionyx. I remember collecting them at the time and thinking how weird they looked but I presumed the markings were the result of damage etc. so didn't give them much thought. Interestingly I've found a reference in a paper from 1890 on the fossil chelonians of the Isle Of Wight that states: "There is a third species of chelonian, the remains of which are comparatively rare, and the outer surface of whose carapace is furrowed in lines, much after the manner of the larger species of recent land tortoises." This accurately describes the pieces I have, but as far as I know no large tortoise (or any tortoise material) has been collected from the Bouldnor Fm. and with the paper being nearly 130 years old I took it with a pinch of salt. I was wondering if anyone would be able to confirm if these pieces are actually from a separate taxa of chelonian or whether the markings could've been caused during diagenesis etc. Thank you, Theo
  3. Giant Eocene Penguin was Human-size

    Giant ancient penguin was human-size By Jen Christensen, CNN, December 12, 2017 http://www.cnn.com/2017/12/12/world/giant-ancient-penguin-found/index.html Ancient Penguins Were Giant Waddling Predators Carl Zimmer, The New York Times, December 12, 2017 https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/12/science/ancient-penguins-kumimanu.html Fossil hunters find man-sized penguin on New Zealand beach, The Guardian https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/dec/12/fossil-hunters-find-man-sized-penguin-on-new-zealand-beach Giant Penguin: This Ancient Bird Was As Tall As a Refrigerator By Laura Geggel, December 12, 2017 https://www.livescience.com/61178-giant-penguin-fossils.html Hospitaleche, C.A., 2014, General palaeontology, systematics and evolution (Vertebrate palaeontology) New giant penguin bones from Antarctica: Systematic and paleobiological significance Nouveaux os de manchots géants de l’Antarctique : importance systématique et paléobiologique. Comptes Rendus Palevol Volume 13, Issue 7, October 2014, Pages 555-560 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S163106831400058X?via=ihub Yours, Paul H.
  4. Hi, I thought I'd show some of my first micro-vertebrate fossils from the Bembridge Marls Mbr. of the Bouldnor Fm. I collected around 2kg of matrix from one of the 'shelly' estuarine horizons in the lower part of the member at Hamstead Ledge, and am really pleased the results so far! The Bembridge Marls form the basal member of the Bouldnor Fm. and were deposited between 34.0 and 33.75 million years representing the final 250,000 years of the Eocene epoch. The depositional environment varies throughout the member and many beds are laterally discontinuous (like the Insect Bed, which produces finely preserved insects, feathers, leaves, and lizard skin impressions). Generally however, the Bembridge Marls were laid down in a sluggish lagoonal/estuarine environment with areas of wetland and adjacent sub-tropical/tropical forests, in the southern regions of the Hampshire Basin. To the south were forested chalk uplands that are now the downs of the Isle Of Wight. There was also some fluvial influence from rivers flowing from the west, draining the uplands around Dartmoor in Devon. Fauna-wise vertebrates like fish and freshwater turtles are common, and mammal remains are rarely found (in comparison to the overlying Hamstead members which are rich in post and pre-grande coupure mammals), these include palaeotheres, creodonts, rodents, anoplotheres, choeropotamids, xiphodonts, and primates. So far I've only searched through a small amount of the matrix but it has produced indeterminate teleost vertebra, Bowfin teeth, fin spines, indeterminate fish premaxillae, and a very nice crocodilian tooth. (The quality of the images isn't always fantastic but I'm trying to find a way to work around it in the microscope's program) Isolated fish vertebra from teleosts are by far the most common micro-fossil, and I've collected more than 10 so far. Here's a nice example: Bowfin teeth are also quite common and vary in size from 2-7.5mm in length. Bowfins would have been ambush predators feeding on smaller fish and other vertebrates in the lagoons and estuaries. Based on vertebra I've found ex-situ on the beach it seems some of these fish were very large. (Close up of one the teeth) These pre-maxillae also seem to turn up from time to time and appear to be from some form of teleost. The closest match I can find is with some kind of Gadiform? And finally the best find so far, a crocodilian tooth crown. I spotted this on the surface of one of the matrix blocks. It's most likely from the alligatoroid Diplocynodon which was very common in the wetlands and rivers of Europe from the Palaeocene to the Miocene. Diplocynodon has also been found in the early Eocene marine deposits of the London Clay suggesting that they frequented both freshwater and brackish/coastal habitats. The matrix is nowhere near fully sieved and sorted through yet so hopefully there's a lot more micro-vertebrates in there! Hope this was of interest, Theo
  5. Hi, I collected some fossiliferous matrix yesterday from the Bembridge Marls Mbr. and Lower Hamstead Mbr. of the Bouldnor Fm. and was wondering if anyone could advise me on the best method to separate the clay from the micro-fossils. I've been interested in collecting micro vertebrate remains alongside the larger material for a while now and received a digital microscope for my birthday last week. I had a go at extracting some from some smaller pieces of matrix I collected last weekend (by simply washing the clay around in a bowl and then repeatedly decanting it) and produced a rodent incisor and various fish bones. I'm worried that just washing the clay around may destroy some of the fossils so I was wondering if there was a safer way to extract them that effectively separates the matrix from the fossils. The matrix itself is from estuarine facies, and is essentially clay that is heavily packed with gastropods, bivalve fragments, and vertebrate material (predominantly fish and crocodilians). Any help would be really appreciated, Theo
  6. Below are shark, ray, and bony fish coprolites from three trips from matrix that I collected from an early Eocene marine site in Virginia awhile back. I would find around 1,000+ coprolites from eight 5 gallon buckets of formation (40 gallons) per trip; so they were pretty common at the site. A good number are very small only a few millimeters to 10 millimeters. Lots of them have fish bone inclusions. I’m finishing searching the matrix (two trips worth left) that I collected from this site. I’ve donated thousands of these coprolites to the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science. Marco Sr.
  7. Help in identification

    hello what about this ? family? genus? Is this Athleta?
  8. The two specimens below are from the Eocene of Virginia. I’ve collected this site for many years and not found anything similar. They look like they are pieces of an echinoid. I’ve never found an echinoid, echinoid spines or pieces of echinoids from this site or any other site in Virginia before. EDIT: I should have put this information in the original post. These specimens are from a marine formation. They are very thin, almost paper thin. Yet they are hard and not flexible. Specimen 1 6mm x 5mm Specimen 2 5mm x 2mm Marco Sr.
  9. Blue Forest Fossil Wood Rough A.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Blue Forest Fossil Wood SITE LOCATION: Blue Forest, Eden Valley, Sweetwater Co., Wyoming, USA TIME PERIOD: Eocene (~ 50 million years ago) Petrified wood (from the Greek root petro meaning "rock" or "stone"; literally "wood turned into stone") is the name given to a special type of fossilized remains of terrestrial vegetation. It is the result of a tree or tree-like plants having completely transitioned to stone by the process of permineralization. All the organic materials have been replaced with minerals (mostly a silicate, such as quartz), while retaining the original structure of the stem tissue. Unlike other types of fossils which are typically impressions or compressions, petrified wood is a three-dimensional representation of the original organic material. The petrifaction process occurs underground, when wood becomes buried under sediment or volcanic ash and is initially preserved due to a lack of oxygen which inhibits aerobic decomposition. Mineral-laden water flowing through the covering material deposits minerals in the plant's cells; as the plant's lignin and cellulose decay, a stone mold forms in its place. The organic matter needs to become petrified before it decomposes completely. The Blue Forest digs have been producing fossil wood for many generations and the locality still continues to give up its treasures. It is located in the west end of Eden Valley approximately 30 miles west of Farson. The fossil wood found in this area is well known for the light blue chalcedony that can be associated with many of the specimens. This chalcedony is frequently found enveloping the fossil wood with botryoidal layers making for very attractive specimens. Those that know say that there is still tremendous collecting potential in the Eden Valley of Wyoming and the Blue Forest digs -- and if a collector spends enough time and energy exploring these deposits his efforts will surely pay off with great finds. Kingdom: Plantae
  10. Blue Forest Fossil Wood Rough A.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Blue Forest Fossil Wood SITE LOCATION: Blue Forest, Eden Valley, Sweetwater Co., Wyoming, USA TIME PERIOD: Eocene (~ 50 million years ago) Petrified wood (from the Greek root petro meaning "rock" or "stone"; literally "wood turned into stone") is the name given to a special type of fossilized remains of terrestrial vegetation. It is the result of a tree or tree-like plants having completely transitioned to stone by the process of permineralization. All the organic materials have been replaced with minerals (mostly a silicate, such as quartz), while retaining the original structure of the stem tissue. Unlike other types of fossils which are typically impressions or compressions, petrified wood is a three-dimensional representation of the original organic material. The petrifaction process occurs underground, when wood becomes buried under sediment or volcanic ash and is initially preserved due to a lack of oxygen which inhibits aerobic decomposition. Mineral-laden water flowing through the covering material deposits minerals in the plant's cells; as the plant's lignin and cellulose decay, a stone mold forms in its place. The organic matter needs to become petrified before it decomposes completely. The Blue Forest digs have been producing fossil wood for many generations and the locality still continues to give up its treasures. It is located in the west end of Eden Valley approximately 30 miles west of Farson. The fossil wood found in this area is well known for the light blue chalcedony that can be associated with many of the specimens. This chalcedony is frequently found enveloping the fossil wood with botryoidal layers making for very attractive specimens. Those that know say that there is still tremendous collecting potential in the Eden Valley of Wyoming and the Blue Forest digs -- and if a collector spends enough time and energy exploring these deposits his efforts will surely pay off with great finds. Kingdom: Plantae
  11. I started this one today. Went deep to try and find the carapace and BAM!!! Hit the dang carapace!!! I hate that but it does happen. Here are pics of different stages of prep so far. got a ways to go but after that monster big concretion from New Zealand, its nice to see progress so soon!! RB
  12. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Baltic Amber, Fossil, Formicidae, Ant Probably Kalingrad area, Russian Federation Eocene epoch, circa 44 million years ago The Baltic region is home to the largest known deposit of amber, called Baltic amber or succinite. It dates from 44 million years ago (during the Eocene epoch). It has been estimated that these forests created more than 100,000 tons of amber. Today, more than 90% of the world's amber comes from Kaliningrad Oblast of Russia. It is a major source of income for the region; the local Kaliningrad Amber Combine extracted 250 tonnes of it in 2014,[3] 400 tonnes in 2015. "Baltic amber" formerly thought to include amber from the Bitterfeld brown coal mines in Saxony (Eastern Germany). Bitterfeld amber was previously believed to be only 20–22 million years old (Miocene), but a comparison of the animal inclusions in 2003 suggested that it was possibly Baltic amber that was redeposited in a Miocene deposit. Further study of insect taxa in the ambers has shown Bitterfeld amber to be from the same forest as the Baltic amber forest, but separately deposited from a more southerly section, in a similar manner as Rovno amber. Other sources of Baltic amber have been listed as coming from Poland and Russia. Because Baltic amber contains about 8% succinic acid, it is also termed succinite. Ants are eusocial insects of the family Formicidae and, along with the related wasps and bees, belong to the order Hymenoptera. Ants evolved from wasp-like ancestors in the Cretaceous period, about 99 million years ago, and diversified after the rise of flowering plants. More than 12,500 of an estimated total of 22,000 species have been classified. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Insecta Order: Hymenoptera Family: Formicidae
  13. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Baltic Amber, Fossil, Formicidae, Ant Probably Kalingrad area, Russian Federation Eocene epoch, circa 44 million years ago The Baltic region is home to the largest known deposit of amber, called Baltic amber or succinite. It dates from 44 million years ago (during the Eocene epoch). It has been estimated that these forests created more than 100,000 tons of amber. Today, more than 90% of the world's amber comes from Kaliningrad Oblast of Russia. It is a major source of income for the region; the local Kaliningrad Amber Combine extracted 250 tonnes of it in 2014,[3] 400 tonnes in 2015. "Baltic amber" formerly thought to include amber from the Bitterfeld brown coal mines in Saxony (Eastern Germany). Bitterfeld amber was previously believed to be only 20–22 million years old (Miocene), but a comparison of the animal inclusions in 2003 suggested that it was possibly Baltic amber that was redeposited in a Miocene deposit. Further study of insect taxa in the ambers has shown Bitterfeld amber to be from the same forest as the Baltic amber forest, but separately deposited from a more southerly section, in a similar manner as Rovno amber. Other sources of Baltic amber have been listed as coming from Poland and Russia. Because Baltic amber contains about 8% succinic acid, it is also termed succinite. Ants are eusocial insects of the family Formicidae and, along with the related wasps and bees, belong to the order Hymenoptera. Ants evolved from wasp-like ancestors in the Cretaceous period, about 99 million years ago, and diversified after the rise of flowering plants. More than 12,500 of an estimated total of 22,000 species have been classified. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Insecta Order: Hymenoptera Family: Formicidae
  14. Eocene Leaf ID Help

    Today I was going through some drawers and came across this leaf fossil that I acquired from a friend about 20 years ago. It was labeled Elm Leaf Eocene with not location. I am even wondering if this is an Elm leaf. Does anyone recognize this Fossil and location?
  15. Gray shark tooth

    A tiny tooth of an Abdounia minutissima. Bought from an old collection. The site at which it was collected, the Egem quarry, is now unfortunately closed. I have had some confusion to the family: on fossilworks.org, in the order Carcharhinoformes, it says that Abdounia is a subtaxa, while it's already a genus. It goes straight from Order to Genus, and it doesn't cite any family. If anyone knows more about this, please feel free to send me a PM and I will edit the post.
  16. Sigmesalia intermedia

    Shell preservation
  17. Shell preservation.
  18. Shell preservation
  19. Claw from the Eocene of Virginia

    I just found this 7mm by 3mm claw searching matrix that I collected years ago from an Eocene site in Virginia. The site was a near shore, marine environment. I found a good number of turtle and croc fossils at the site in addition to fish, shark and ray fossils. However, I also found close to 100 bird bones of different species and several terrestrial mammal specimens. Unfortunately the specimen is not in the greatest condition. I've found lots of crab claws at the site but it is definitely not crab. Out of the possibilities of reptile, bird and mammal the claw looks like it is from a bird to me based upon the curve. What do you think? Marco Sr.
  20. Mioplosus labracoides Cope, 1877 Hatchling

    From the album Vertebrates

    Mioplosus labracoides Cope, 1877 Middle Eocene Ypresian Green River Formation Kemmerer Wyoming USA Length: 3.5cm
  21. From the album Some of my best Sheppey fossils

    This is a beautiful calcite cast of the centre of a cimomia imperialis nautilus. You can clearly see the septa and siphuncle detail.
  22. From the album Some of my best Sheppey fossils

    This is a selections of my nautilus collection from the Isle of Sheppey's London clay. The nautilus on Sheppey are often crushed or heavily pyritised but occasionally good quality 3D specimens can turn up.
  23. Chuckanut Formation Fossil Flora

  24. Euthryofusus (Wrigleya) regularis

    Siderite steinkern
  25. Cassidea ralligensis

    Siderite steinkern
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