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Found 6 results

  1. Epibionts on ammonites

    This weekend Natalie found an intriguing fossil: a Hypoturrillites whit an epibiont on the shell. I've rarely seen this kind of association and it makes me wonder if the epibiont was already on the shell when the ammonite was alive or dit it grow on it after it fell on the sea floor. If anyone has papers on the subject it would be greatly apriciated ( @doushantuo maybe? )
  2. Wenlock Weirdies.

    Hello, everybody! I have been sorting through my wenlock limestone material, Middle Silurian and have a couple of personal problematica. I am wondering if any of you brilliant folks could help me out. Here is an object which seems to be an epibiont on a Favosites coral. 5 mm long and about 1.5 mm diameter at the widest. Is it a cornulitid ? Or a single corallite of Aulopora? Something else, maybe? And another one? On a solitary rugose coral. 3 mm x 1 mm. And an example of Aulopora from Wiki to compare : And a cornulitid that looks a bit similar : I would be very grateful for any help. Then there is this. Is it the worm Keilorites? Length 1.9 cm, width 2.5 mm max.
  3. Hungry Hollow epibiont help

    Hello everyone! This past Saturday, Viola and I braved the cold to do some fossil collecting in the south pit of Hungry Hollow near Arkona, Ontario (Mid-Devonian). When I got home and washed up my specimens, I saw something interesting on one of the horn corals - I think it's a brachiopod - am I right? And does anyone know its identity? Thanks in advance for your help! Monica
  4. Community on the Half-Shell

    I love finding multiple fossils. I don't just mean multiple specimens in a single rock, I mean fossils that show evidence of more than one life-form. Shells with burrow traces, for one example. Dung beetle balls. Predation marks. And particularly, epibionts. Here I have a fairly ordinary specimen of the brachiopod Tropidoleptus carinatus. Ordinary, that is, until a closer look is taken.... This specimen supported an variety of other critters on its pedicle valve. Whether the epibionts took hold while the brachiopod was alive, or colonized the dead shell, I don't know; I would speculate the former, as the brachiopod is articulated. I think it is likely that the whole living community was buried together by mud. So who's here? Let's take a closer look. We have several examples of Cornulites hamiltoniae. Some are (relatively) large, while others are very small: Two more Cornulites pictures, then we'll see who else lived here!
  5. epibiont ID

    From a Callovian - Oxfordian site, rich in epibionts, e.g. serpulids. I don't recognize this one, do you?
  6. Epibionts And 'xenobionts'

    Does anyone know of any instances -- or suspected instances -- of organisms that are known only from associated fossils, i.e. organisms that left absolutely no trace (i.e. 'xenobiont'), but are detectable from various epibionts that were once attached? In the Pennsylvanian of Kansas City, there are thin limestone beds in the lower Wea Shale that contain an abundance of Crurithyris brachiopods and ammovertellid forams that range persistently at least for several tens of miles. From south Kansas City, MO: From Excelsior Springs, MO, approximately 30 miles to the north: The ammovertellids are the little white things, and the Crurithyris are the bluish bb-like shells. Normally, in other strata, these fossils are sparse or only locally present. I didn't think much of these beds until I read that both fossil types have been found as epibionts attached to calcareous algae (both) and echinoids (Crurithyris). (See http://palaios.geoscienceworld.org/content/18/4-5/435.abstract and PDF at http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Current/2005/sawin/sawinandwest.pdf (page 9) ). This made me wonder if there were some soft bodied organism (perhaps sea-grass-like algae) that were present in abundance but left no trace -- carbon films, impressions, root/holdfast impressions, etc -- but did leave behind a mess of formerly attached shells. I can imagine vast 'gardens' stretching over wide expanses of the shelf.
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