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Found 11 results

  1. Just a short video of a quick trip to the beach last week to enjoy the spring sunshine!
  2. I found this rock 50 years ago on the farm where I grew up in northern Illinois. The bedrock is far below the surface there. The surface rocks are erratics, dropped by glaciers that moved southwest from Canada through Michigan and into Illinois. It appears to be a kind of agate with some druzy quartz on it. I've recently shown it to several people and have gotten several different opinions on what it is and how it was formed, including that it is some kind of fossil. What do you think? The surface lines you see in some of the photos (most clearly in the third photo) are narrow and evenly spaced. There are about eight lines per millimeter. I increased the contrast in the ninth photo in an attempt to make the lines more visible. The other photos have not been manipulated, except by cropping. The pit in the third photo is about 2mm x 3mm and about 15mm deep.
  3. trilobite

    Erratic boulder from central Europe. Ordovician or Silurian. Any ideas as for the trilobite group, e.g. order? The ornamentation is quite characteristic, I presume. Librigena?
  4. any ideas on this 'earthworm'?

    Any ideas??? Trilo spine? Coral? Brach shell edge fragment? Erratic boulder (Ordovician or Silurian in age), central Europe.
  5. crinoids - ossicles

    Ordovician or Silurian erratic boulder from Poland. Sorry for poor quality photos - I'm not able to get better for now. What are these 8-shaped lumen ossicles? Also, can you spot fragments of calyx?
  6. crinoids - stems

    Ordovician or Silurian erratic boulder from Poland. Sorry for poor quality photos - I'm not able to get better for now. Is this a chance association or can you spot fragments of calyx, stem, and cross sections through arms? What crinoids are these - crotalocrinitids?
  7. crinoid on sponge?

    Erratic boulder from Poland. Age unknown but likely Late Cretaceous to Danian. The silicified concretion is developed around a sponge, visible in view places, like the spot on the photo. This specific spot bears also a ramose feature. Could it be part of the sponge anatomy or a crinoid root?
  8. Bivalvia or pygidium

    Ordovician or Silurian erratic boulder from Poland. It's not the first time I come across this type of fossil. Would you say these are bivalves or some big trilobites' pygidia?
  9. total mystery (asterozoan?)

    I found it today in gravel on a parking lot in Poland. Age remains uncertain, as the rocks present were all erratic boulders. What can that be? An asterozoan, perhaps?
  10. Coral, Sponge or Bryozoan?

    I'm stumped. I've been collecting erratics off the beach along the Delaware Bay for the last six months and I keep coming up with mysteries. This specimen is 1" long. Unfortunately, because it is an erratic, all I can tell you is that rocks of this type wash down from the Appalachians all along the Delaware River and Bay til it reaches the Atlantic Ocean. They are Paleozoic, but I don't know enough of the geology from PA and NJ to narrow it down by rock type to a formation. Can't find a high enough resolution GEO Survey map, either. Other fossils in this type of rock are rugose corals, tabulate corals, bryozoa, and pinhead-sized crinoids, so big possible spread on the time frame. No trilobites yet, unfortunately! I have a small id sheet from the Mahantango Formation and an ID book for the Middle and Upper Devonian of NY, but neither have anything similar. I posted on the FB group and got three people saying it was one of these (yeah, I knew that) but each thought it was a different phylum. Can I get a consensus on phylum, if not a genus here? Can anyone give me links to good reference material for my other mysteries?
  11. Greetings. This is my first post, and I have a real puzzle for you folks to look at. Let me preface by say that I usually research any question I have as much as I can before seeking assistance by asking for help through forums online. This time, however, I have absolutely no idea where to start. I understand most of the basics about geology and fossil formation, from stellar formation right up through tectonics, volcanism, and the development of life and how it ends up dead in the mud and eventually on display in a museum somewhere. Unfortunately, I live in the Kennebec River valley in Central Maine at the falls in Madison, near the marine limit of the last ice age and countless before. Our farm is on a silty clay deposit sitting upon gravel moraine and ancient riverbed and bedrock, all of it gouged, cut-up, stirred, covered over, stirred again, turned up, covered, washed over, spit on and ground up by and finally given a goodnight kiss from the meandering Kennebec River and what I understand was the occasional 5-mile thick wall of ice and rock. So, really, I have no idea, at all, geologically, what the heck is going on. I have glacial erratics on the property so big they look like bedrock outcroppings, but they are really like little tiny parts of Canada. So when I found a well-eroded river rock with a crazy mish-mash fossil well-packed with what look like seaweed or ferns and a bulbous eye-like feature I can't help but wonder what it is, and when it is from, but I have no idea where to start. The rock itself came from inside a tall moraine being harvested for gravel, pretty much exactly above the last ice age's marine limit. The stone itself is eroded enough to make me think it must have spent some time in a riverbed after having fossilized, so that must be some sort of clue to its age. It also has spent at least the last 12,000 years in that ridge, of course. The other bizarre thing about the fossil is that in the days after I cracked it open, it changed color. I had suspected there was something inside because of the odd characteristics of the rock, so I gave it a couple good whacks with another rock and when it opened it was pretty even colored, but a few days later, it had taken on the richer colors you can see in the photos below. I hope that it isn't some deadly ancient mold spore which is actually responsible for the devonian extinction. Anyways, if anyone has any insight, please, I'm so curious I could burst.
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