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Found 120 results

  1. Possibly European bone fragment

    Almost a month ago, trying to fight the boredom, I started to sort all the things that inevitably gathered in my basement. In an old box full of things donated by my granparents I found what i think are 2 fragments of bone, I don't know if fossilized or not. I've already called them but they don't rebember exactly how and where they acquired the finds. The only thing they say is that it was a gift from a friend they've encountered during a trip in central / southern europe. I know in the past they visited (apart from other localities in France) Romania, Italy and Austria. Describing now the bone fragments, I don't really know if they're fossil or more recent finds. One seems to be part of a jaw bone (the first 3 photos) but cannot identify even the family / order of the animal. The second one is a real mystery; it has a strange pattern on one of the outer surfaces and at first i thought it was wood. I think both of them could be mammal bones, but maybe I'm wrong. Many thanks to all who could help me out.
  2. Tyrolian belemnite

    atractitoa3988d.pdf Nino Mariotti ,Johannes Pignatti Atractites Jeletzkyi,a new xiphoteuthidid coleoid from the Lower Lias of Tyrol,Austria Geol.Roman.v.32,1996 Locus typicus:Pfonsjoch holotype: five fragments,glued together telum reasonably complete @Heteromorph @FranzBernhard
  3. devonian(syn)ecology

    New data on the intergrowth of Rugosa-Bryozoa in the Lower Devonian of North Gondwana Yves PLUSQUELLEC ,Françoise P. BIGEY Carnets Geol. 19 (18) Creative Commons License DOI 10.4267/2042/70538 PDF LINK
  4. paleozoic malacology

    DBNA Middle and Upper Devonian Cryptodonta (Bivalvia)from the Pelagic Hercynian Facies -Taxonomy, Stratigraphy, and Paleoecology Judith Nagel Inaugural dissertation,2006 ABOUT 5,8 MB the research areas on a Devonian geodynamic reconstruction :
  5. Paleoichthyology,Part one

    Knowing Carnevale's musical predilection,I can pretty much guess the origin of the genus name Bollettino della Società Paleontologica Italiana, 58 (3), 2019, 295-307. Modena ISSN 0375-7633 doi:10.4435/BSPI.2019.18 A dragonet (Teleostei, Callionymoidei) from the Eocene of Monte Bolca, Italy Giorgio Carnevale & Alexandre F. Bannikov CarnevaleBannikov2019-Gilmourella.pdf
  6. Hello, I am searching for geologic time dates for some formations. Most are named in the 1800's, so the names may make no sense. Europe Maybe France? carboniferous limestone of borlton, County of La Couronne Ireland, Lower Carboniferous Limestone, Ireland Calc carbonif Armagh? Formation and locality: Mountain Limestone, Armagh England, Ticknall Formation, Mississippian, Ticknall, South Derbyshire, England carboniferous limestone around Bristol Carboniferous Limestone: Oreton, Shropshire. United States Kansas, USA Plattsmouth limestone, Oread formation, Virgilian, upper Pennsylvanian, in a quarry in northwestern Franklin County, Kansas Indiana, USA Keokuk beds, Bono, Lawrence county, Ind. Clark and Harrison. counties Illinois, USA Subcarboniferous (Keokuk); Illinois, Iowa Chester limestone, Chester and Pope county, Illinois. Worthen used the name Chester limestone for the same beds which Hall called Kaskaskia, but included this Chester limestone with the underlying sandstone in what he called the "Chester Group." In the limestone above coal No. 8, Upper Coal Measures; near Springfield, Illinois. In the upper beds of the St. Louis limestone; Alton, Illinois. Pennsylvania, USA a stratum about one foot thick, black, carboniferous, and calcareous, head of inclined plane number 3 of the old portage railroad," which crossed the Alleghany Mountains from Hollidaysburg Ohio, USA coal measures of Cambridge, Ohio. Limestone near Cambridge Nebraska, USA Upper Coal Measures, Bennet's mill, near Nebraska City.
  7. Hey there, I´m quite interested in the history of earth, but I have no experience in fossil hunting at all. This summer i want to spend two month traveling around eastern europe with Interrail. I want to search fossils at least a couple of days. I want to go to a place where it´s possible to find very old stuff. The only places I´ve seen on the list of fossil sites on wikipedia where: the Sanpetru Formation in Romania - Cretaceous Donetsk - Ukraine - Carboniferous and Razdolne - Ukraine - Devonian It would be nice to know if it´s possible for amateurs to find stuff in theese places. When you need professional equipment or too much time to find anything i would like to know where else in eastern europe I have better chances as an amateur to find interesting fossils. Peace Out, Leon Noel
  8. Hello everyone! Like most Europe, here in Bulgaria the winter is also very warm. Today we had 16C with totally clrear sky, so I decided to go hunting on a placed I was gathering info. 150Km from Sofia to the North, is the village of Belotintsi. There is a small Gorge formed by a creek "Nechinska bara" and the outcrops are part of Jurassic of Bulgaria. My source was the National history museum of Sofia and some publications of professors found online. The initial goal was to observe mostly the area as I was little tired for climbing and not properly prepared in terms of equipment. The whole area around (Border with Serbia, Stara Planina Mts, Golo Burdo Mt close to Sofia) were the bottom of Tethys sea. Here is a general aspect of the locality. Next time I plan to go to the upper part of the formation (Oxfordian). Pictures numbered from 1 to 4 show some spiecements on the field. The rocks are rich in CaCO3 as they highly react with vinegar. The stones are easily separated with very light blows. Picture number 1, I think I forgot it there Pictures Sa-Sd: Macrocephalites versus or gracilis I think. Se: This big fella, sadly found in pieces. I believe it is a different spieces to Macrocephalites. Probably it was detached from a formation above. Sf-Sg: Some fragments Sh-Si: I gathered these only to try testing with preparation process. As a novice, I do not want to ruin something nice that was preserved for million of years due to lack of experience. Hope you like the pictures. None of the fossils are museum quality; nevertheless I really enjoyed the day. Wish to everyone happy and fruitful hunting trips! Regards, Dimitris.
  9. Hello! I am an MPhil student studying plesiosaurs, I am really struggling to locate Cretaceous aged specimens. Since I am based in the UK, most of the museum collections contain Jurassic age fossils so you can image I have an abundance of these! I thought it would be best to ask on the fossil forum since people from all over the world use this. Does anyone know of any museums in Europe or the US that contain large marine reptile collections that might contain a lot of plesiosaurs?
  10. additions to knowledge:Cretaceous Fish

    A new species of dercetid (Teleostei,Aulopiformes) from the type Maastrichtian of southern Limburg, the Netherlands Jonathan J.W. Wallaard, René H.B. Fraaije, Henk J. Diependaal and John W.M. Jagt Netherlands Journal of Geosciences, Volume 98, e2. wallaapiscrdnew_species_of_dercetid_teleostei_aulopiformee_type_maastrichtiasouthern_limbure_netherlands.pdf
  11. je suis un heteromorphe

    recommended!!! en Francais/In French [Trav. Lab. Géol. Grenoble, t. 42, 1966] Leptocères berriasiens du massif de la Grande-Chartreuse par Jean-Pierre THIEULOY thieuleptoceraheteromammollus(VACISEK)GA_1966__42__281_0.pdf
  12. hogstromhrsloegstroembrigsshunsrucklagerstincsedismachaeridiadevoniarsl1981.full.pdf A pyritized lepidocoleid machaeridian (Annelida)from the Lower Devonian Hunsruck Slate, Germany Anette E. S. Hogstrom, Derek E. G. Briggs, and Christoph Bartels Proc. R. Soc. B (2009) 276, 1981–1986 doi:10.1098/rspb.2008.1875
  13. german trilobites(dreilapper)

    wint Trilobiten aus dem Grenzbereich Emsium/Eifelium (Devon) im Raum Winterberg/Züschen (östliches Sauerland) Stephan Helling & Lothar Schöllmann Geologie und Paläontologie in Westfalen 90: 25-65 slightly more than 24 MB
  14. hexapoda/mantoidae/Oise /Pseudomantoida

    New Paleogene mantises from the Oise amberand their evolutionary importance THOMAS SCHUBNEL and ANDRE NEL Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 64 (4): 779–786. schuNELinsemantilagersthexapoapp006282019.pdf @Coco @fifbrindacier
  15. Echinoid ID

    Found recently in Split, Croatia, near Adriatic sea, on hill called Marjan Location If someone can tell the species? Thanks
  16. Oyster maybe?

    Found today in Split, Croatia Is it some shell? It is about 30 cm long (about 12 inches)
  17. Is this a ball joint fossil?

    I found it in Latvia (Europe), near Broceni, on my land. Excavator was digging pebbles and rocks for road repair, and about 2 meters deep I spotted this stone which looked interesting. Some of the other stones around contain small shell imprints. And at the depth of about 4 meters there is Zechstein rocks: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zechstein As I understand that means that millions of years ago there was a sea, where I am digging my rocks now. Please take a look at that piece of rock and tell me what you think, could it be a fossil? https://photos.app.goo.gl/VXCZtHJ1Jej9SiJy7 Thank you.
  18. Cretaceous nacre

    Here Stolarski J (2018) From pristine aragonite to blocky calcite: Exceptional preservation and diagenesis of cephalopod nacre in porous Cretaceous limestones. PLoS ONE 13(12): e0208598. https:// doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0208598
  19. Mammal teeth

    Hello together, here I have 4 fragmentary teeth and only a slight idea what they could be. Nr. 1 is the only one I found myself, in the gravel at teh rhine river. its relatively heavy and colourfull what makes me think it could be (sub-)fossil. Looks like a bovid or cervid to me. Any further ideas? Nr. 2 I bought on online, together with nr. 4, they where supposedly found in lignite. Nr. 4 looks like a tiny proboscidean to me (only a layer out of a tooth), with nr. 2 I have got no idea.(small piece of similar layer? Nr. 3 seems to be a carnassial, I think its from china. The texture may tell something to some of you? Thanks in advance for any information you can give me. Aloha, J
  20. brach anatomy

    I found this apparently silicified pedicle valve as an erratic boulder. The age is unknown, but presumably Ordovician or Silurian. Provenance of Baltica (found in Poland, but in gravel parking lot). Any clues on the order? The rest of the shell is hardly preserved. Can you help to verify my anatomical identifications?
  21. Humans pushed cave bears to extinction, their DNA suggests Washington Post, By Ben Guarino, August 15 2019 https://www.washingtonpost.com/science/2019/08/15/humans-pushed-cave-bears-extinction-their-dna-suggests/ Gretzinger, J., Molak, M., Reiter, E., Pfrengle, S., Urban, C., Neukamm, J., Blant, M., Conard, N.J., Cupillard, C., Dimitrijević, V. and Drucker, D.G., 2019. Large-scale mitogenomic analysis of the phylogeography of the Late Pleistocene cave bear. Scientific reports, 9. (open access) https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-47073-z Yours, Paul H.
  22. How to ID Fossils

    So I've been collecting fossils for a few years now, i have a bunch of ammonites, sea urchins, mollusks and plants but I have no idea where can i learn what exact species they are. I'm wandering if there is any books or sites to which you can point me so I can gather some knowledge . I know there is an ID section in this site but I want to be able to tell what species I have found, myself. By the way I'm from Europe.
  23. Hey folks maybe you can help me out. Especially the European collectors. Here in Texas we have historically had several species of Tetragramma listed as occurring in the Fredericksburg Group (Albian) that are possibly synonymous. For those of us who collect here in Central Texas there never seemed to be any doubts about what was a Tetragramma malbosii versus a T. taffi. T. taffi are always larger and seem quite distinct from T. malbosii. (see my two examples) But in 2016 William Morgan wrote the Collector's Guide to Texas Cretaceous Echinoids (Schiffer Publ.) and in it he lists T. malbosii as having precedence, suggesting that they are just not as full grown as taffi. He sites the work of Smith & Wright, 1993. I know T. malbosii is found in Europe. What about T. taffi? What does a very large European T. malbosii look like? The one I am using as an example is the largest one I have but it is still not as large as the T. taffi and doesn't have nearly the same number of tubercles in the interamb. Your thoughts, opinions, observations, etc.??? And if anyone can point me to a link or a PDF of the following paper I would greatly appreciate it and could reward with a nice Texas echionoid... British Cretaceous echinoids. Part 3, Stirodonta 2 (Hemicidaroida, Arbacioida and Phymosomatoida, part 1) Author: Andrew B Smith; C W Wright; Palaeontographical Society (Great Britain) Publisher: London : Palaeontographical Society, [1993] Series: Monograph of the Palaeontographical Society, v. 146, no. 593. Tetragramma taffi (Cragin, 1893) Tetragramma malbosii (Agassiz & Desor, 1846)
  24. Hello again! I'm almost ready to label my Carboniferous fossils, and since I know pretty much nothing about plants fossils, I was hoping to get some help Specimen #1 from Pennsylvania, USA: Specimen #2 from Illinois, USA - each half of one nodule: Specimen #3 from New Brunswick, Canada: Specimen #4 from New Brunswick, Canada: Specimen #5 from Poland: Specimen #6 from England: Thanks in advance for your help! Monica
  25. unknown in flint

    Found on a parking lot in southern Poland. The flints in the area can be either Late Jurassic or Late Cretaceous-Paleogene in age. The most common fossils are sponges, but ichnofossils, brachiopods, bivalves, echinoids, bryozoans and dasyclads also occur. Any idea on this one?
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