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Found 104 results

  1. Is this a ball joint fossil?

    I found it in Latvia (Europe), near Broceni, on my land. Excavator was digging pebbles and rocks for road repair, and about 2 meters deep I spotted this stone which looked interesting. Some of the other stones around contain small shell imprints. And at the depth of about 4 meters there is Zechstein rocks: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zechstein As I understand that means that millions of years ago there was a sea, where I am digging my rocks now. Please take a look at that piece of rock and tell me what you think, could it be a fossil? https://photos.app.goo.gl/VXCZtHJ1Jej9SiJy7 Thank you.
  2. Cretaceous nacre

    Here Stolarski J (2018) From pristine aragonite to blocky calcite: Exceptional preservation and diagenesis of cephalopod nacre in porous Cretaceous limestones. PLoS ONE 13(12): e0208598. https:// doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0208598
  3. Mammal teeth

    Hello together, here I have 4 fragmentary teeth and only a slight idea what they could be. Nr. 1 is the only one I found myself, in the gravel at teh rhine river. its relatively heavy and colourfull what makes me think it could be (sub-)fossil. Looks like a bovid or cervid to me. Any further ideas? Nr. 2 I bought on online, together with nr. 4, they where supposedly found in lignite. Nr. 4 looks like a tiny proboscidean to me (only a layer out of a tooth), with nr. 2 I have got no idea.(small piece of similar layer? Nr. 3 seems to be a carnassial, I think its from china. The texture may tell something to some of you? Thanks in advance for any information you can give me. Aloha, J
  4. brach anatomy

    I found this apparently silicified pedicle valve as an erratic boulder. The age is unknown, but presumably Ordovician or Silurian. Provenance of Baltica (found in Poland, but in gravel parking lot). Any clues on the order? The rest of the shell is hardly preserved. Can you help to verify my anatomical identifications?
  5. Humans pushed cave bears to extinction, their DNA suggests Washington Post, By Ben Guarino, August 15 2019 https://www.washingtonpost.com/science/2019/08/15/humans-pushed-cave-bears-extinction-their-dna-suggests/ Gretzinger, J., Molak, M., Reiter, E., Pfrengle, S., Urban, C., Neukamm, J., Blant, M., Conard, N.J., Cupillard, C., Dimitrijević, V. and Drucker, D.G., 2019. Large-scale mitogenomic analysis of the phylogeography of the Late Pleistocene cave bear. Scientific reports, 9. (open access) https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-47073-z Yours, Paul H.
  6. How to ID Fossils

    So I've been collecting fossils for a few years now, i have a bunch of ammonites, sea urchins, mollusks and plants but I have no idea where can i learn what exact species they are. I'm wandering if there is any books or sites to which you can point me so I can gather some knowledge . I know there is an ID section in this site but I want to be able to tell what species I have found, myself. By the way I'm from Europe.
  7. Hey folks maybe you can help me out. Especially the European collectors. Here in Texas we have historically had several species of Tetragramma listed as occurring in the Fredericksburg Group (Albian) that are possibly synonymous. For those of us who collect here in Central Texas there never seemed to be any doubts about what was a Tetragramma malbosii versus a T. taffi. T. taffi are always larger and seem quite distinct from T. malbosii. (see my two examples) But in 2016 William Morgan wrote the Collector's Guide to Texas Cretaceous Echinoids (Schiffer Publ.) and in it he lists T. malbosii as having precedence, suggesting that they are just not as full grown as taffi. He sites the work of Smith & Wright, 1993. I know T. malbosii is found in Europe. What about T. taffi? What does a very large European T. malbosii look like? The one I am using as an example is the largest one I have but it is still not as large as the T. taffi and doesn't have nearly the same number of tubercles in the interamb. Your thoughts, opinions, observations, etc.??? And if anyone can point me to a link or a PDF of the following paper I would greatly appreciate it and could reward with a nice Texas echionoid... British Cretaceous echinoids. Part 3, Stirodonta 2 (Hemicidaroida, Arbacioida and Phymosomatoida, part 1) Author: Andrew B Smith; C W Wright; Palaeontographical Society (Great Britain) Publisher: London : Palaeontographical Society, [1993] Series: Monograph of the Palaeontographical Society, v. 146, no. 593. Tetragramma taffi (Cragin, 1893) Tetragramma malbosii (Agassiz & Desor, 1846)
  8. Hello again! I'm almost ready to label my Carboniferous fossils, and since I know pretty much nothing about plants fossils, I was hoping to get some help Specimen #1 from Pennsylvania, USA: Specimen #2 from Illinois, USA - each half of one nodule: Specimen #3 from New Brunswick, Canada: Specimen #4 from New Brunswick, Canada: Specimen #5 from Poland: Specimen #6 from England: Thanks in advance for your help! Monica
  9. unknown in flint

    Found on a parking lot in southern Poland. The flints in the area can be either Late Jurassic or Late Cretaceous-Paleogene in age. The most common fossils are sponges, but ichnofossils, brachiopods, bivalves, echinoids, bryozoans and dasyclads also occur. Any idea on this one?
  10. Importing fossils

    Hello all I recently saw a cool tooth on an American website. It's pretty expensive so I don't want to take too much risks. When I look up how much shipping and import costs to Europe would be it would be as much as half the price of the tooth itself. Is this normal or did I do something wrong? Anyone has any experience with this? The fossil is not illegal or anything, it comes from a perfectly legal location. I just think it's weird to pay like 1,5 times the price for a tooth. Looking forward to your answers and help. Greetings and thanks already.
  11. Fish teeth? Any ideas?

    We have found these on the same samples where we found some shark and ray teeth... it looks like teleost teeth?! Grid scale (5 mm) Any ideas?
  12. taphonomy & methodology

    Disentangling the history of complex multi-phased shell beds based on the analysis of 3D point cloud data Mathias Harzhauser, Ana Djuricic,Oleg Mandic,Martin Zuschin,Peter Dorninger,Clemens Nothegger,Balázs Székelyb,Eetu Puttonen,Gábor Molnárb,Norbert Pfeifer Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology Volume 437, 1 November 2015, Pages 165-180 1-s2.0-S0031018215004149-main.pdf taxa concerned: Paroxystele amedei (Brongniart, 1823) r Superfamily: Neritoidea Rafinesque, 1815 Agapilia pachii c Nerita plutonis (Basterot, 1825) f Superfamily: Cerithoidea Férussac, 1821–1822 Ptychopotamides papaveraceus (Basterot, 1825) f Granulolabium bicinctum (Brocchi, 1814) r Turritella gradata (Hörnes, 1856) r Oligodia bicarinata (Eichwald, 1830) r Petaloconchus intortus (Lamarck, 1822) c Superfamily: Calyptraeoidea Lamarck, 1822 Calyptraea depressa (Lamarck, 1822) f Calyptraea irregularis (Cossmann & Peyrot, 1919) f Superfamily: Velutinoidea Gray, 1840 Erato sp. r Superfamily: Naticoidea Guilding, 1834 Polinices pseudoredemptus (Friedberg, 1923) f Neverita josephinia (Risso, 1826) r Superfamily: Muricoidea Rafinesque, 1815 Ocenebra crassilabiata (Hilber, 1879) c Ocinebrina striata (Eichwald, 1853) c Janssenia echinulata (Pusch, 1837) r Nassarius edlaueri (Beer-Bistricky, 1958) f Cyllenina suessi (Hoernes and Auinger, 1882) c Tudicla rusticula (Basterot, 1825) c Superfamily: Cancellariidae Forbes and Hanley, 1851 Solatia exwestiana (Sacco, 1894) r Superfamily: Conoidea Rafinesque, 1815 Perrona semimarginata (Lamarck, 1822) r Perrona louisae (Hoernes and Auinger, 1891) r Perrona vindobonensis (Hörnes, 1854) r Class: Cephalopoda Cuvier, 1795 Aturia aturi (Basterot, 1825) r Class: Bivalvia Linnaeus, 1758 Superfamily: Gastrochaenoidea Gray, 1840 Rocellaria dubia (Pennant, 1777) r ok,am quitting the italics for once Superfamily: Arcoidea Lamarck, 1809 Anadara diluvii (de Lamarck, 1805) r Superfamily: Limopsoidea Dall, 1895 Glycymeris deshayesi (Mayer, 1868) r Superfamily: Mytiloidea Rafinesqe, 1815 Perna aquitanica (Mayer, 1858) f Septifer oblitus (Michelotti, 1847) r Superfamily: Pteriidae Gray, 1847 Isognomon soldanii (Deshayes, 1836) r Superfamily: Pectinoidea Rafinesqe, 1815 Pecten styriacus (Hilber, 1879) r Aequipecten macrotis (Sowerby in Smith, 1847) r Superfamily: Anomioidea Rafinesque, 1815 Anomia ephippium Linnaeus, 1758 r Superfamily: Ostreoidea Rafinesque, 1815 Crassostrea gryphoides (Schlotheim, 1813) f Ostrea digitalina (Dubois de Montpereux, 1831) f Superfamily: Lucinoidea Fleming, 1828 Loripes dujardini (Deshayes, 1850) r Megaxinus incrassatus (Dubois de Montpereux, 1831) r Diplodonta rotundata (Montagu, 1803) r Superfamily: Chamoidea Lamarck, 1822 Pseudochama gryphina (Lamarck, 1819) r Superfamily: Cardioidea Lamarck, 1809 Cardium hians (Brocchi, 1814) Acanthocardia paucicostata (Sowerby, 1839) f Superfamily: Mactroidea Lamarck, 1809 Ervilia pusilla (Philippi, 1836) r Superfamily: Solenoidea Lamarck, 1809 Solen marginatus (Pulteney, 1799) c Superfamily: Tellinoidea de Blainville, 1814 Tellina planata (Linnaeus, 1758) r Superfamily: Veneroidea Rafinesque, 1815 Cordiopsis islandicoides (Lamarck, 1818) r Venerupis basteroti (Mayer, 1857) f related editorial note: GEOSPHERE is a free access publication;the link is quite long,and i noticed i got the message : session timed out so: a slightly more indirect way of pointing the way: https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/gsa/geosphere/article/12/5/1457/189679/high-resolution-3d-surface-modeling-of-a-fossil High-resolution 3D surface modeling of a fossil oyster reef Ana Djuricic Peter Dorninger Clemens Nothegger Mathias Harzhauser Balázs Székely Sascha Rasztovits Oleg Mandic Gábor Molnár Norbert Pfeifer Geosphere (2016) 12 (5): 1457-1477. WARNING: 45 MB
  13. First air scribe

    Hello everyone I have decided to start prepping with some mechanic aid and was hoping for some advice. The compressor I have runs at 8 bar, 120l/min and has a 6l tank. The air scribe I am considering is from Krantz and has the following technical data: 36000 beats/min air consumption: 25–30 l/min pressure: 3–7 bar weight: 250 g size: Ø 17 x 160 mm length of the tube: ca. 2,5 m with internat. plug-in coupling pointer: acute, hard metal, medium, 38 mm My first question is if it looks like a good choice for a first scribe, any other alternatives anyone can suggest? My second question is if I need an external component to control the maksimum air pressure? On the compressor I can adjust the pressure range it runs on from x-8 bar, where x is the minimum pressure i allow it to go, before it brings it back up to 8 bar, but the scribe prescribe a 3-7 bar running pressure. Any spare parts worth getting straight off the bat? Best regards
  14. unknown

    Ordovician or Silurian. Pleistocene erratic boulder. Central Poland. Black, shelly object + nicely ornamented mould, which may or may not belong to the same fossil. As always - sorry for the unpreped state + poor photos. So far, I considered: Leptaena fragment, trilobite sclerite, or Catenipora in side view. Any ideas?
  15. the Serpukhovian unconformity

    Campionserpukmaloofochemistry-_Geophysics-_Geosystems.pdf Constraining the Timing and Amplitude of Early Serpukhovian Glacioeustasy With a Continuous Carbonate Record in Northern Spain Alison Campion , Adam Maloof, Blair Schoene , Sergey Oleynik, Javier Sanz-Lopez , Silvia Blanco-Ferrera , Oscar Merino-Tome , Juan Ramon Bahamonde, and Luis Pedro Fernandez Geochemistry,Geophysics, Geosystems, 19. https://doi. org/10.1029/2017GC007369
  16. Here is another piece of my dinosaur collection - this time material from Eurasian countries. Unfortunately don't have any Triassic or Early Jurassic material, so let's begin with Middle Jurassic (Bathonian) of Itat formation, Krasnoyarskyi region, Russia. Theropods are the most common dinosaurs from there, yet their teeth rarely exceed 15 mm in length. Here is my largest one - could be from Kileskus aristotocus, an early Proceratosaurid (ancestor of Cretaceous tyrannosaurs) and the only described dinosaur from this location. Here are a bunch of Kileskus teeth I had before There also likely were more theropod species, similar to contemporary Chinese Dashanpu formation - methriacanthosaurids (equivalent to Sinraptor), megalosaurids and ceratosaurs. Some teeth I have or had that could be megalosaurids due to bulkier shape and finer serrations (all around 1 cm). In addition I have some specimens from diverse herbivores - Stegosaurids Long-necked sauropods (Mamenchisauridae), possible embryonic teeth Heterodontosaurid fang tooth, 5 mm (huge for this species!)
  17. echinoderm ossicle

    Different views of a single element, 3 mm at its biggest dimension. I find a lot of echinoids as well as bourgueticrinid and starfish ossicles in the sediment. What's your opinion? Calyx fragment? Lower Campanian, marine, southern Poland.
  18. fish or reptile

    How to tell apart mosasaur and Enchodus teeth? This fragment is 2 mm in length. It has longitudinal striations (not visible on photo) and at least one cutting edge (there might be a second on the other side, but some surface is missing there, and a bit of sediment is adhering), the cross section seems to be oval-to-irregular (but see comment above). The lower part is witish, the upper - redish. Sorry for the poor quality picture. Lower Campanian, marine, southern Poland.
  19. heteromorph or gastropod

    What's your opinion? Lower Campanian, marine, southern Poland.
  20. Good evening, I'd like to ask if anyone knows if it's possible to find fish fossils in jurassic mudrock. As far as I can tell, it must be exceedingly rare in Slovakia.
  21. Hey guys, I’m heading to Raalte in The Netherlands for a family trip and wanted to know what the fossil/artifact scene is there and if there are any spots you all would recommend! I’d love to bring home some European fossils
  22. The Ordovician of Oland

    phosphthesi about 36 MB ******************** Phosphatized echinoderm remains from the upper lower Ordovician strata of northern Oland,Sweden preservation,taxonomy and evolution Magnus Svensson Examens arbete i Geologi vid Lunds Universitete n 105/1999 ******************** diacritics omitted("Oeland") Could the bee have any more knees? Nope. characterization:Monograph/thesis. 54 pages excluding bibliography
  23. Seasonal skate

    MArr A new Miocene skate from the Central Paratethys (Upper Austria): the first unambiguous skeletal record for the Rajiformes (Chondrichthyes: Batomorphii) Giuseppe Marramà, Ortwin Schultz & Jürgen Kriwet Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, DOI: 10.1080/14772019.2018.1486336 category: "stand well back when reading this" 10 out of ten
  24. Hello, Anyone knows where I can buy riker mounts to fossil display in Europe... I want to avoid problems with customs and a european site or seller will be perfect. Thanks
  25. A highly diverse molluscan assemblage associated with eelgrass beds (Zostera marina L.) in the Alboran Sea: Micro-habitat preference, feeding guilds and biogeographical distribution José L. Rueda, Serge Gofas, Javier Urra and Carmen Salas Scientia Marina 73(4) December 2009, 679-700 ruedamollusca1137.pdf size :3.1 MB
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