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Found 7 results

  1. UPDATE: Object with Embedded Shark Tooth!

    Hi all, I am thrilled to bring you an update on the object I posted not too long ago in the Fossil ID section. As advised, I brought it to the Calvert Marine Museum to be examined by expert eyes, but unfortunately the paleontology staff was not at the museum when I arrived, so I left the fossil with them along with my contact information and details about the location and age of the fossil. This was a few weeks ago. I just recently received a voicemail from the museum staff notifying me that an expert on marine mammals had taken a look at the fossil and rather easily recognized it as a dolphin periotic, a bone in the ear! When I called back and asked about the shark tooth that was buried in the bone, they said he must've missed that (I don't blame him; it's a small tooth!), but I asked if it would've been a result of feeding. They confirmed that the tooth undoubtedly wound up in the bone when a shark bit into the animal, but suggested that it is much more likely that it was a result of scavenging, not hunting. Because of the size of the tooth especially, it is most reasonable to conclude that a small shark scavenged the remains of the dolphin after it died, as a shark of that size typically would not pursue such large prey. Regardless, I think it's a spectacular find and it's certainly one of my favorite in my collection. A huge thank you to the experts at the CMM for their unparalleled expertise and willingness to help out an amateur. I'm very happy with my find, and can't wait to go pick it up next time I'm in the area. Thanks for reading this update! ~David (p.s. below is a picture of the fossil that I posted on the original ID thread. I'll post more detailed pictures once I pick it up from the museum)
  2. Shark Tooth Embedded in Bone?

    If this is truly what I suspect it is, it could be the most extraordinary fossil I've found to date. This was found at Bayfront Park, which is Calvert Formation. It appears to be some kind of bone, probably from a marine mammal. When I first found it, that's all I thought it was: a bone. It was only when I was back home from my trip and sorting through all my finds that I noticed something peculiar. There was something protruding from the bone. I couldn't believe my eyes. It was a fossilized shark tooth. I have always thought it would be incredible to find a fossil with tooth marks or even an entire tooth embedded in it, but I never thought it would actually happen! My best guess at the moment is that this is an ear bone from a small whale or dolphin that fell victim to a lemon shark, and when the shark bit the animal, its tooth was jutted into the bone. When the animal died, its bone fossilized with the tooth still inside it. My question for you is not whether or not the object protruding from the find is a lemon shark tooth; that is fairly clear. I am looking for confirmation that the fossil is indeed a bone, and would like to know what type of bone it is and from what animal. Since I believe this to be an extremely uncommon find, I am considering bringing it to the Calvert Marine Museum to be inspected by the experts there, and if they want to keep it I will gladly donate it. Thank you in advance. ~David (P.S. The tooth is only fully visible in the last picture)
  3. Theropod dinosaur teeth are usually ziphodont, but the morphology of the denticles varies between species and clades. Gorgosaurus (a tyrannosaurid) and Dromaeosaurus (a dromaeosaurid) both have rectangular denticles despite differences in body size and shape and tooth size. Saurornitholestes (a dromaeosaurid) has pointed denticles that, over time, can wear down to resemble those of Dromaeosaurus. Troodontids (like Troodon) have unique hooked denticles that differ significantly from those of dromaeosaurids. Paper looks at the biomechanics of these different morphologies, not for everyone but interesting. https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(18)30371-3
  4. IOW UK dino

    Kats Looking forward to the dental microwear analysis already
  5. predatory fish,or?

    uniline (piranha-like pycnodont(Vullo et al/Nature,dec.2017,free access,large: about 18 Mb)
  6. camarasaurus,Plateosaurus

    this is pretty new,as things go http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/pala.12266/epdf
  7. cetacean filter feeding

    two related pieces. Werth 2001 Bull MCZ baleencetacv cleaning.pdf Werth et al 2016 Baleen cetaceawear patterns.pdf
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