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Found 121 results

  1. Plant Hash Plate

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    1) Shrub/vining plant - Spenophyllum majus 2) unidentified seed fern 3) Neuropteris sp. 4) Scale tree- Lepidodendron sp. 5) Seed Fern- Alethopteris sp. 6) Seed Fern- Neuropteris? 7) Shrub/vining plant- Sphenophyllum sp. McIntyre Mt., Ralston, PA Pottstown member, Lewellyn Fm. Carboniferous
  2. Pecopteris sp.

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Fern leaf Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  3. Neuropteris ovata

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Fern leaf with colorful iron oxide coating left by the plant itself Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  4. Neuropteris ovata

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Fern pinnae Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  5. Alethopteris2.JPG

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Tree Fern leaf impression Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  6. Alethopteris fern with Cordaites leaf

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Tree Fern Leaflet The white highlights are most likely kaolinite left from the plant itself. Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  7. A very small group of us ventured into the wilds of northern PA last weekend, equipped with masks and a permit to poke around a state wildlife preserve with Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation exposures. It was a gorgeous day and the colors of the limestone really shone in the sunlight. As we got there, a pair of permit-less fossil poachers were just leaving. How do I know that they didn't have a permit? Because they absolutely did not follow the rules. Since it is a wildlife preserve, it is important that anyone looking for fossils not leave craterous holes in the ground and replant any plants that were uprooted in the process of digging said holes. They left holes everywhere. Our intrepid permit holder filled in most of the holes so that she could keep getting permits in the future. For this reason, I'm not going to be any more specific about the location. That said, there were so many wonderful plant fossils to find! The site is remarkable for its red, orange and yellow limestone, which makes for some terrific, high-contrast fossils. Many of them had crisp details. What's more, there was quite a variety.
  8. Hello, I was wondering where to find PA fern fossils. I've heard of both the Carbondale and St. Clair sites, but I've read these are both closed to collecting. Where else could I find some decent fern fossils? I am from NJ (so this would have to be on the East/Central parts of PA for a day trip).
  9. Chinese style hot dogs for breakfast.The "hot dog" was invented only in the last twenty years, and is a model of Chinese and Western combination:).I don't know if you've ever heard of steamed bread. The steamed bread is outside and the sausage is inside.It actually tastes ok.Then I drank some soy milk.Soybean milk is also a popular breakfast in China. Arriving at a plant fossil once found.It was a cloudy day and I was using telephoto, so it was a bit dark.The top of the hill is a temple, but I don't know if it's Buddhist or Taoist. The first discovery, perhaps, was of lepidodendron. The second one, it's a cute little guy. Found a beautiful leaf. Slowly uncover it.But because of the invasion of iron oxide, the rock was brittle. Ferns were found. Carefully dug for a long time, the result is still broken:( The next few. The final image is of an American Ivy in the wild.I like its leaves. They are very beautiful.But I don't know why the leaves closed a little bit, maybe I came too early.
  10. San Diego fossil plants

    Hey everyone pretty new here. My wife and I were at the beach collecting shells and I noticed some erosion on the cliffs and found these in the ruble. I think these are fossil plants. Looks to me like a leaf and fern? I’d love some help putting a name to these if possible. USA, California, San Diego, Sunset Cliffs on the beach
  11. St.Clair fern ID

    Hello everyone, I received this Carboniferous fern fossil along with many others from @Fossildude19 earlier this week. The largest one in the picture caught my eye due to the interesting shape of the pinnules, they are quite elongated and the ones lower down on the pinna are somewhat spiky at the base. I tried doing some research but was unable to find any ferns that had these structures. Any help is appreciated. Thank you very much, Misha
  12. Pennsylvanian Fern ID

    Several years ago I collected these ferns in central PA. I am currently working back through my collection making sure that everything has an identification. I have most of the identifications down, but could use some help pinpointing or confirming these identifications. Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks! #1- ???? - I tried to tip it in the light so that it is more visible. It measures about 53mm #2- Neuropteris ovata? #3- Macroneuropteris scheuchzeri? It measures 40mm #4- Neuropteris? #5- Neuropteris on the left? I know that it is Macroneuropteris scheuchzeri on the right #6- Macroneuropteris scheuchzeri? #7- ???? - It looks like a branch with thorns
  13. Late Pennsylvanian Seed Fern

    Hi all, Here’s an interesting plant find. I discovered it in a locality in Western PA known for producing good plant fossils. I’m thinking seed fern, maybe related to Alethopteris somehow but to be honest I’m not sure what the species is. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance Stratigraphy: Connelsville Sandstone of the Casselman Formation of the Conemaugh Group. Age-Late Pennsylvanian, ~305 MYA
  14. I recently acquired some fossils that were said to have been from the Breathitt Formation of Leslie County, Kentucky. The majority of the specimens were smaller slabs of rock with fern/horsetail fossils (Neuropteris, Sphenopteris, Macroneruopteris, Alethopteris and Calamites). However, two of the specimens that i received were quite large and I am struggling to come up with an identification for them. Specimen #1 - The rounded fossil measures 27.5 cm (10.8 inches) wide and is 7 cm (2.8 inches) at its thickest point. (second specimen will be in second post due to photo size restrictions)
  15. I don’t have a clue. Fern? Snake?

    I was looking at shale pieces that had some cool shells sticking out. I thought I would break the best piece off instead of toting the whole slab to the truck. I went to knock a chunk off and this was exposed. I first saw the snakeskin looking part and then I saw the red. I never would’ve know it was there if I hadn’t broke it. Can anyone tell me what it is and can it be saved? I think I managed to find the majority of the small bits. For reference it is only about 1.5in long. I ended up toting the whole piece back. Now I gotta see if it was worth it.
  16. small CP fern pinnae

    It is found in the same supposedly delta setting, together with plant branches, sphenophyllums, crinoids, and marine and non-marine shells. any idea what it could be? I am just guessing it is fall-off from some fern plant. The finest mark is 1mm.
  17. Hi everyone, i will bE going to corys lane around 10 or 11 am tomorrow if anyone is interested in joining. I will also be free to go any other time for the next week plus if anyone is interested in joining.
  18. Mazon Creek Insect Wing or Leaf?

    This concretion from the Mazon Creek area Chowder Flats site split earlier this week but I just had a chance to examine it today. It preserves a narrow ~10 mm long veined object, unfortunately with a portion missing from the middle. The shape and venation makes me think of an insect wing, but it could certainly be a partial leaf of some sort instead. I would love to hear thoughts from anyone with more experience. I had to take the pictures through my loupe since it is so small- the first two are of the part and the third is the counterpart.
  19. Coprolite? Fern? Bone? Wood?

    Good morning folks. I have an item that I picked up listed as "dino poo" about ten years ago. The seller knew nothing about it except that he thought it was poo by sliced it and now thinks it "could be" a fern or poo. Help please. It's very heavy an measures about 6" in length. I was thinking petrified fern or wood. It's a beautiful specimen that really needs a name so I can display it.
  20. Mazon Concretion

    Hey all! Just bought this piece at a rock shop here in Chicago. It was sold to me as a shrimp, the shop owner was pretty confident in this, but I'm pretty sure it's a fern instead. Not disappointed since I just appreciate the composition here, it's a super pretty one, kind of off-beat. Can anybody help ID the exact fauna? Thanks so much!
  21. Plant fossil???

    I’ve found other fern/plant fossils in this area. Is this one as well? If so, what’s on it? I have others to show as well. Found in Ohio in a river, north central area. Thanks for all information!
  22. Odontopteris perhaps? Fern / Plant

    I think this is Odontopteris. The flat leaf tips are what have me thinking that. I have lots of local shale that I can pull these from readily, but maybe once or twice over an hour I can pull one this size out. Any fern experts here able to validate? Attaching a couple fossil plates that I use to identify local ferns.
  23. Centralia's Bright White Ferns

    Deep in the heart of Pennsylvania's coal country runs the Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation. Once a vast tract of swampland, the area was home to 100 ft. tall Calamites (an extinct relative of modern herbaceous horsetails), giant tree ferns and other enormous plants, plus proportionally large insects. The conditions during the intervening millennia were just right for the plants to break down into iron-based minerals, including pyrophyllite and kaolinite, leaving a coating of white powder over the impressions in the rock. In rare spots, the iron minerals come in yellow, orange or red, too. All this makes the fossils stand out in sharp contrast to the dark, gray shale matrix. This is not a place for the timid. The shale is on a steep, slick slope covered in loose scree. The trees that look like good hand-holds are dead and rotten. Below the surface, fires burn in the coal veins, creating a sinkhole hazard all over the ghost town and on to the neighboring towns. However, the place I was hunting is definitely a beaten path these days, so there is probably a low risk of invisible disaster. I always say that no rock is worth your life, but that doesn't stop me from living a little dangerously. I went there for the first time last month. It was a short stop close to dusk. The fog was thick and the rocks were wet. The white powder was hard to make out in the gloom. Today, the light was good, the rocks were dry and the hunting was good!
  24. Should I Consolidate?

    I recently purchased this Alethopteris sp. at a local fossil show. It is typical of shale found in St. Clair Pennsylvania being beautiful, but also very fragile. It’s my first plant fossil that isn’t petrified wood so I’m very excited about it! My question to all you experienced preppers out there is... Should I consolidate it? It has the characteristic layering associated with shale, which tend to split and come apart easily. I don’t plan on the piece being handled much, if at all, but don’t want it falling to pieces in a few years as it sits in my display case. If best practice is to consolidate, what consolidant would you recommend?
  25. Fern ID

    So I got this Fern nodule yesterday. It came with no info. Approx 6 cm Any ideas?
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