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Found 56 results

  1. Fossils from the new guy

    I'm brand new to Fossil Forum, and can't afford the big splashy wall display fossils, so my "collection" is modest, but it's a start. I have three of these fern plates from St. Clair, PA, and two diplomystus fish fossils from the Green River formation in Wyoming.
  2. On a short schedule for searching so it was a mad dash. I have very few ways to easily reach the Pennsylvanian Formations. Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian-Mississippian no problem. Anyway, I've found some interesting ferns in the Pennsylvanian Gobbler and wanted to see what I could find in another location about 3 miles as the crow flies away. About 1.5 miles into the site and a fairly productive morning for an initial search. Not the best of specimens but holds promise. Found this interesting brachiopod panel presenting itself with some glints. It was easily opened up by dragging my long chisel into it Some of the brachs. Not cleaned up yet.. A brach hash plate and the layer the brachs deposited on showing trace fossil depressions. Not cleaned yet A couple of phylloid algal limestone specimens
  3. With a little bit of the fern revealed I took my smallest chisel and smallest hammer to split this specimen. Width of left specimen is 5" (approx 100mm) about 25mm of fern was showing initially
  4. Arkansas ferns x3 and Annularia ID.

    These were fossils my dad found over 20 years ago I think and gave to me maybe 10 yrs ago. I had completely forgotten about them. My dad use to be a land man for an oil and gas company. So he traveled the area extensively trying to get leases to drill for gas. I believe they are from somewhere near Mansfield, Arkansas from the Atoka or McAlester formations, both of which are Pennsylvanian. Any my help with ID would be greatly appreciated. First Piece The longest blade is about 55 mm long by 13 mm wide. A close up of some of the blades on the left side. I think there are 2 varieties here, not sure if the arching one is like the ones in the center and to the left of it. The center one is the top side of the blade and the one to the left and arching one appear to be the underside of the blades. It’s cool to be able to see that much detail. Then there is a different variety on the top left corner. I’ll take some close ups of those and post in a bit. A pic of the right side a bit closer up. I think in this pic there are at least 3 varieties of ferns. The ones on the top right pointing downwards which may be the same as those on the top left above. Then the long blade in the center running vertically. I think it is the only one of its kind represented on this plate. Then at the bottom running mostly horizontally. I have no clue as to the genus or even group of Medullosans. If I had to guess I’d say Neuropteris for all 3, but it’s a wild guess. Second piece is an Annularia of some kind I believe. You can se the long slender stems and then many long, slender leaves, which appear to have numerous veins running the length of the leaf. They are all cross crossing each other so it’s a bit chaotic to try to isolate one cluster. This is the back side. It has a couple stems running across it. There is more stuff in between layers on both pieces.
  5. Hello. My name is dobare and I used to do a decent amount of fossil hunting on beaches around Maryland. I still do, just not as much. And I've split some rocks a few times also. I'm gong up to Hershey for the weekend and I was hoping to look for a couple of fern fossils and/or trilobites. Are there any in the Hershey/Harrisburg area or surrounding vicinity? Thanks! Feel free to message me. I understand that some sites should remain low-key.. thanks again.
  6. Hey guys. This is a pretty random selection of the Carboniferous fossils that my kids and I have collected. I have a lot at about this quality, and some better ones but we'd rather not sell them if we can help it. I hadn't planned on selling any of them, but life throws you curve balls and here we are. Whoever responds to this, thank you so much.
  7. I have a lot of unopened Mazon Creek concretions and though I do put some out in the winter for the Freeze / Thaw process, the vast majority, especially the larger ones do not open. So to dwindle my concretions, I have no problem whacking them with a hammer, and that is what I was doing today. As we all know, this is not the best way to do it since it can damage a nice specimen, but I take my chances. I always picked up any concretion that looked promising and never passed up larger ones. This all depends on the are that you are collecting, concretions from Pit 11 are never super large, but Pit 4 always produced larger ones - see below. Though these are large, they are by no means my largest. The vast majority of the time there is nothing inside, like the one below. Other ones produce something nice, like this Alethopteris that I cracked open today. Cleaned up_ A couple of my other finds from today, nothing spectacular, but is nice to get rid of the dud ones. Neuropteris Annularia Annularia, Neuropteris and Bark Asterophyllites Bark Essexella asherae Jellyfish
  8. Good Spots in West Central PA?

    I'm going to take a trip from Miami to Pennsylvania to see some family. I was also considering to fossil hunt myself for something to do. I've only hunted in the Peace River, however, and I don't have much experience of actual digging. I'm trying to find some good spots that I can almost definitely find something interesting like a well preserved trilobite or something. I'm also interested in places like Red Hill to find some teeth and bone, or places with diverse ferns and lycopods. I only have a day to do it, so I probably wouldn't be too intrusive. I'd probably be staying in Indiana or Dubois (which me and my mother could significantly raise the population) but I don't want to be too far east from there. I just want to know some good spots and some tips to find the best fossils. thank you!
  9. Cordaicarpus seeds or fish scales?

    Some more items from the Llwellyn formation at St. Clair that I'm trying to pin the ID down on. I have found oodles of these in some layers at St. Clair and the rounded shape makes me think they are Cordaicarpus seeds. However, there is not enough detail for me to be sure. Someone also suggested then could be fish scales but they have no blue tint (which is from the phosphates found in bones and scales) nor ornamentation. Thoughts?
  10. Mariopteris vs Sphenopteris

    As I am going through my boxes of findings from the Llewellyn formation at St. Clair, PA, I came across some more interesting plates. Normally I would call this short, rounded foliage "Sphenopteris" but some research with the PA Geological Survey's book "Fossil Plants from the Anthracite Coal Fields of Eastern Pennsylvania", General Geology Report 72, 1982, John Oleksyshyn, I'm thinking these might be more accurately called Mariopteris cf. lobata. Here is Figure 14 from the book that illustrates (plates A,B) what I think is a close match to what I have. The book also states that the specimens that are used for the plates come from St. Clair so it is known to occur there. Thoughts?
  11. Today I figured that I would crack open a couple dozen concretions to see if there was anything of interest. Hitting them with a hammer is not the preferred practice, but I have so many that I could never freeze / thaw them in 2 lifetimes. The concretions that I opened today were collected from Pit 4, mostly flora and fresh water fauna are found at that location. Today I found the run of the mill ferns, leaves and a couple very pretty pieces of bark.
  12. Carbondale, PA

    I took to trip to the Poconos this weekend and stopped by Carbondale for a hunt (thanks Jeffrey P for the info on it)! I think I did well and had a really fun trip. It was a little tricky to get there but definitely worth it! I found several fossils ferns and other plants as well as fossil bark - I'm not 100% done going though them yet, but these are my favorites of the trip. On the last two, I would appreciate any info. on what they may be. Thanks! ..
  13. Work has me in Exton, Downingtown this coming week. I was wondering if there are any accessible sites that I a FL boy could find something Older or Different than Shark's Teeth or Miocene era fossils. I'd love to find a bug or fern frond but if all you have is Shark teeth I'm happy to hunt for those too.... Thanks in advance, Kevin
  14. Members of the Green Party

    A pretty useful capsule review of leaf shapes in ferns. Recommended?You betcha. vascofernleaveslaminbotanyreviewnfpls-04-00345.pdf outtake:
  15. WV Localities

    If anyone has any material/links on West Virginian fossils and/or localities feel free to add to this page- I am going to continue to gather up resources on the state and post on here. LINK: <> https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/User:Abyssal/Paleontology_in_West_Virginia - Very brief explanations for localities in Eastern WV <> http://donaldkenney.x10.mx/STATES/WV.HTM - Largest collection of localities for WV I've seen to date, however, some that are listed are just locations that have only been known to contain one fossil. (^ Links I've found so far ^) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- (V Links posted by other members V) Looking on the western end of West Virginia, but everything is useful. (Links will be credited.) Thanks.
  16. Carboniferous fun in SW VA

    Fruits of "me time" in road cuts in Russell and Wise counties in southwest Virginia 3/25/17.
  17. Pennsylvania Ferns

    Well it seems that St. Clair is closed for fossil fern digging but I wanted to know if anyone had a status on Carbondale. I found this: The website that @Fossildude19 appears to be outdated. I also found: Sue used to live in PA and her specialty was ferns. I sent her a message about her discoveries and locations. Hopefully Carbondale isn't closed to the public. There has to be some place in eastern PA that is open to the public that has some decent ferns.
  18. St Clair PA Fern Hunting

    I was interested in driving up to Pottsville, PA to look for some fern fossils around St Clair. From reading: and then: It seems that the sites around St Clair are now owned by Reading Anthracite a coal company and that digging or collecting of the ground is strictly prohibited. I also found this: http://readinganthracite.com/access-permits/ That implies a $125 permit for going onto their property to do things such as ATV and bike. Nowhere on there do I see anything that mentions digging or collecting fossils but from the previous post I gather that such activities are prohibited. My question is two-fold: 1. There has to be somewhere close to St Clair that is full of fern fossils. Would someone mind sharing the location? I would be willing to mail this individual some of the finds and some of these finds would be going to a university. None of them would be for sale. 2. Would anyone be willing to make the trip with me? I could even pick you up and cover gas as I do have a Prius. My current location is Washington DC. Thanks everyone. I know there has to be some ferns still out there.
  19. Need Some ID-ing Help - Round Two

    This is my round 2, of things i found, and helping me properly name and catalog them. First picture, i think is some kind of coral? 2nd picture - Coral also maybe? kinda looks like little suction cup suckers? 3rd picture - Some kinda spiral shell? 4th picture - Another type of shell 5th picture - probally some type of clam shell, i was excited at first and thought it was a crab top shell. 6th picture - I find alot of these types, a shell of some kind? 7-8-9 - This one is weird, looks like some kind of shell, but then looks almost like it has teeth or little legs. Really want to know what this is? (Deer Lake, Pa.) 10th picture - I found this in a secret spot in St Clair, Pa., looks to me like a segment of a fossilized tree, its round, totally flat on top n bottom, and looks like striations lines in bark? if im right anyway knowing type of tree? Thanks in advance to anyone who helps out, i'll just list round one and two for now, till i get some answers, and if i get anywhere with answers i will post some more, thanks all. Paul.
  20. Need Some ID-ing Help - Round One

    Im really a rock and mineral collector, but gone on fossil trips when i get a chance, and pick up some here n there i find. Im finally getting around to picturing my rocks and cataloging them, and fossils im less an expert. So i would like more information to properly name and catalog them. So any help would be greatful. All of these i have found myslelf. TRILOBITES The first 2 pictures im sure is a trilobite, i found it at Deer Lake, Pa. im thinking a Hollardops or Greenops type? Third picture a trilobite, but probally not enough to identify what type? 4th picture maybe a trilobite head of some kind? PLANTS First picture, i found this in Wilkes Barre, Pa. which is a very high coal producing area. I believe this is a Lepidodendron Tree Casting? 2nd picture some type of tree bark? (Deer Lake, Pa.). 3rd plant picture, maybe lepidodendron leaves? 4th picture, a fern, but what kind of fern is this? these fern leaves look really full and big, and alot i have seen are skinnier and not as full? Any help naming all would be appriciated, give it a shot for me, I will call this round one. Thanks Paul.
  21. A winter hunt

    In Late December, Minnesota is a land impossible to hunt fossils in. So when I took a trip to Ohio this Christmas, I was hoping mother nature would be kind to me and allow me to peak under a few rocks. While visiting my sister in NW Ohio, I convinced her to run up to Paulding with me to check out the Lafarge Quarry. Have seen postings about trilobites from there. We left Lima with no signs of snow on the ground. Two miles from our destination, the ground turned white, and snow was about 4 inches deep. Now I remember why I hated lake effect snow growing up in Ohio!! As long as we drove this far, we decided to travel on just to see the place. Fortunately, there had been a brisk wind that night and the tops of the rock piles were blown fairly clean of snow. Good enough for me. My sister thought I was nuts and remained in the vehicle. Here are the results of my short venture. Would love to visit this place in better conditions. I know how darctooth felt when he posted about his winter, snow covered excursion last week.
  22. TKTW0126

    For identification see: Holmes, W.B.K. (2001) The Middle Triassic megafossil flora of the Basin Creek Formation, Nymboida Coal Measures, New South Wales, Australia. Part 2. Filicophyta. Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales 123, 39-87.
  23. Can someone help me with an ID for these? Thank you!
  24. Hello again to everyone on the forum and can't wait to learn from you. I just joined this week and this will be my first main post. I have always been very interested in fossils and geology and finally went on an official fossil Hunting trip this past week. I went with my family the first time and we scouted out the area. I did a lot of research beforehand and read that Pit 11 was one of the most popular concretion hunting spots at Mazon, but that also means they are harder to find. After more research, I decided we should check out an area to the south called the Mazonia South Unit. I read that this area had been less collected because there is much thicker vegetation. The vegetation was very thick. We hiked for a couple miles into the Forested area and we came to the bottom of a large hill. Me and my brother scaled the cliff and saw a way down the other side. The bottom of the other side of the cliff ended right into a river. After we made it to the bottom, my father found the first fossil, a small leaf, in an open concretion. We then saw concretions everywhere around us and started collecting. We only stayed for about an hour that day because the mosquitoes were relentless. I got home and saw I had some fossils and got so excited, I went back out there by myself the very next day. I scaled the cliffs up and down and got as many concretions as I could. Not satisfied, I just came back from another trip out to Mazon yesterday. I'm still refining my technique, but I spent most of the time going up and down the cliff sides looking and picking for concretions. I had a geologic pick, and a bag as my main tools. The first couple times, I picked everything I saw. After more research, I was more picky yesterday and did a lot of cracking in the field. I am not done processing all my concretions but I will post what I have found so far. Please let me know if you can help identify any of them and if the pictures are good for your viewing. Any general tips for fossil hunting and anything is also welcome I have more than I can post in this one post, but will follow up post with rest of my current photos.
  25. Hi, I would like to show you some plants that I found in the (middle probably) Bathonian of the soutwestern France, near the edge of the "Massif Central". So, I will describe the context of the find quicly : We can find some vegetals in micritic layers intercalated in sublitographic-limestone layers, very often they're fragments of lignitized wood (sometimes with a wonderful conservation and visible tracheids) but it can be reddish wood not lignitized or fragments of leaves. The first mention that I found is Monteil (1977) who indicates the discovery in a neighboring township of two leaf imprints of Otozamites sp. But this source isn't necessarily the most reliable because there are many inaccuracies or errors, but this is the only mention found this period and this area. So, for my own samples, this would be a flora from "wetlands", unusual for the french Jurassic (I believe that only one was found but a little younger, from the upper Oxfordian) and, more interesting, one (at least) of them was supposed to be Sagenopteris sp., a species of Caytoniales ("seed ferns"), never found in France. So here are the leaf imprints (or leaves) of some samples (normally the scales are correct but it is possible that I made a mistake). If someone has an identification idea or a suggestion I would be very grateful to him. 1a : Fern ? 1b 2 Fern with sporangia 3 ? 4 Fern with sporangia 5 Fern with sporangia 6 7 8 9 Fern with sporangia ? 10 Fern with sporangium 11 12 13 14 Fern ? 15
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