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Found 717 results

  1. Fish tooth

    From the album Fossil Collection

  2. Megalichthys Linocut Print

    On finding a Megalichthys scale fossil from the Late Carboniferous in my local stream I designed, carved and printed a lino-block of the carnivorous freshwater fish. In the same slab of rock that the scale was found were Lepidodendron and Calamites fossils that would have been deposited at the bottom of the coal swamp. I would like to have thought of this fish hiding in the murky waters alongside these plants and I based my reconstruction on this. I plan to do a series of three including Rhizodopsis and Rhabdoderma, alongside their respective surrounding vegetation. Credit where credit is due the general proportions and pose of the fish are based on a reconstruction by ДиБгд as seen on Megalichthys' Wikipedia page.
  3. Rhabdoderma Scale ID

    I have a fish scale from the Pennine Middle Coal Measures Formation from North Cumbria (Cumberland Coalfield), UK. Found in the local stream, where there have only ever been 4 fish found, I have found all of them- Rhabdoderma, Rhizodopsis, Megalichthys & Platysomus. Attached is a photo of a scale; that I think is from Rhabdoderma. (The width of the scale is around 5mm [width as in from across from bottom left to top right of scale] Does anyone have any idea about taking this identification further- perhaps down to a species level? Thanks, Tom
  4. Edestus teeth

    From the album Sharks and fish

    The shark relative is genus of eugenodontia holocephalid from the Carboniferous-Pennsylvanian age Anna shale formation, Carbondale group, found in different Illinois coal mines. I dont know(yet)which mine these were found in. This unidentified species is of the "vorax-serratus- crenulatus-heinrichi" or "E. heinrichi group", with the teeth being more of a standard triangular shape, as opposed to being thinner and pointed at a forward angle as in the "E. minor" group http://www.thefossilforum.com/applications/core/interface/file/attachment.php?id=501751
  5. Birthday Fossils

    Hey guys, today (Sept, 8) was my birthday, and my parents, knowing I'm a fossil fanatic gave me some for my birthday. Heres what I got: Croc Tooth I will get better pics of the shrimp and croc tooth tomorrow, it's too late at night right now.
  6. What is this?

    I am a super novice and don’t know scientific names of these things. This one was ound in creek in western Pennsylvania. Lots of fossil stones around covered with black film... oil deposit nearby? Most impressions in black stones are of shells and some plantlike things. This one is more like granite and the thing on top looks sort of like a giant guppy (to me). What do you think?
  7. I was shark tooth hunting and found this fragment on Casey Key, Florida 9 years ago. I recently went through my stuff and found 3 pieces of Mastodon Tooth Enamel. So I'm not sure if it's too small to ID but has a interesting wood grain pattern with enamel on the top. Can you ID it? Thanks FF!
  8. Megalodon teeth

    From the album Sharks and fish

    Megalodon tooth and tooth fragments.
  9. Xiphactinus vertebrae

    From the album Sharks and fish

    Xiphactinus Audax vertebrae NorthEast texas Ozan Formation--Taylor shale upper cretaceous
  10. Hybodus

    From the album Sharks and fish

    Hybodus Houtienensis shark spine Permian to Cretaceous shark (impressive!!!!!) beautiful serration teeth down the back.
  11. Leedsichthys Problematicus

    From the album Sharks and fish

    Small section of a fin ray from a Leedsychthys Problematicus tail. About 2" Lower Ox. Clay, Callovian middle Jurassic. 160 mya Hampton Lakes Peterborough, Cambs, UK
  12. Fish ID- location unknown

    Hey everyone! I’m hoping someone can help with identifying these two fish for me. Seller does not know the location that the fish are from, just that they found it in their grandparent’s shed. There are two on the plate, front and back. The coin used in the photo is approximately 2 cm, so they are tiny fish. Thanks to all that can help!
  13. without a doubt, fish fossils are my favorite type of fossils. the fact something so squishy at first can be turned into stone in a million years or 2 absolutely FASCINATES me. i also have not seen much "lets see your latest" discussions, so i decided to make this .
  14. Hi everyone, on a trip over the weekend to the north of Scotland hunting for Devonian fish I struck it lucky and found a nice specimen of a rare placoderm fish in a hard carbonate nodule. It needs glued back together and reverse prepped and I definitely don't have the experience to do it myself. My 30th birthday is coming up in a few months and my family have really kindly offered to get it prepped for me as a birthday gift, can anyone recommend a preparator in the UK? Any suggestions much appreciated! Regards Sam
  15. Hello everyone, I'm an Italian amateur collector with a small but nice collection of fossils and minerals that I started when I was 5yo in 1995. Then at 15yo I put apart my passion until few days ago when, using my 3D printer, I made some nice modular drawer to reorder in my collection of +-1000 pieces. I will finish the project in the next weeks and I will share it with you, as it can be of inspiration for your collection as well. Doing this hard work, I looked with a more mature point of view some big fossils that my parents and friends (not experts!) gave me as present many years ago. I already noticed that some are painted or assembled, but I would like to hear your opinion about them. #1 Let's start with a good one. This was a present from my mom, so I know she spent not few moneys to buy this fossil fish. I think that it 99% real. My only concern is the right side/section of the matrix that has a change in color (you can see it in the video). Maybe just a not-too-bad restoration... I drew circles around fishes with the pencil when I was a child... I should delete them! #2 Now a bad one... In this example I noticed that maybe the fish body is real (but low quality), it is mounted on a new matrix, and fins are painted... Am I right? #3 Another bad one... This ammonoidea seems painted. The matrix has some fossil shells, it is cracked and repaired (you can see the crack in the video, back side). I'm wondering if it is totally fake/sculpted or only painted. What do you think? #4 The last assembled fossil fish. This one is funny! Sedimentary layers are not parallel with the fossil... Overall I think that the body is real but bad preserved and with some painting. What do you think? #5 This was one of the first fossils of my collection. I personally bought it in Morocco in 1995. I think that this is a real one, joint is perfect. Agree with me? #6 Finally, the last piece: a cambropallas trilobite. About this one, I know that it was bought in a good shop and I think it is not too bad. I'm not sure about the matrix (see the back side), but the main body seems real. It, of course, has some restorations. I'm looking to hear from you. Final thoughts... I'm considering giving away false ones, in particular #2, #3 and #4. But it is also nice to have them to show how fossils are faked/retouched - I think they're part of the amateur paleontology history. I hope you appreciate the photos/videos I took to show some of my fossils. Thanks in advance and best regards!
  16. Mystery Fish

    So I saw this whilst browsing the auction site, and I have zero idea what it is, with no detail to the location or formation that it was found in. I can't say I've ever seen a fish like this one, and without knowing where it was from, even fewer, but maybe the almighty wisdom of TFF might have an idea?
  17. Is this a fish fossil?

    Maybe a stupid question... Found it in Algarve, Portugal (miocene, I guess).
  18. Fish ID

    I saw these two fish swimming around in the sea of products of our favorite auction site, and they were so low priced I had to get them. The problem is the seller only said "found in country side", so I'm hoping with a little bit (or a lot) of help from you guys we can figure it out. They are not in my hands yet, so I can't get more/better pics. Thanks 1. 2.
  19. A nice green river bonus

    This afternoon I went to a local rock shop and scored a nice looking Knightia alta, and it's a keeper at about 4.5 inches length. One thing I always do with my fish is check the edges of the matrix for organic material because usually it's a tell tale sign for another fish hidden beneath the matrix. I noticed there was definitely an un-exposed fish, so I got my tools and went to work. The first thing I exposed was skull material which is purty cool, but soon enough I was on the trail of a complete string of verts! After about 3 hours of chiseling I ended up with.....well......I'm not sure what this is. My first thought was a Mioplosus but now I'm having some doubts. Im starting to think it's some kind of Knightia. But even if the fish can't be ID'd I'm still happy because I think it complements the K. alta quite well .
  20. So I recently bought this fish fossil from an antique shop, supposedly, from the Green River formation in Wyoming. The specimen is about 17 centimeters or 6 inches long, I purchased it because of its relatively low price, but most of all, it's quite large! I'm very limited in knowledge of fish, so I figured I would post it here on the forum, any ideas? I'll also add more photos if needed, thanks in advance.
  21. Fish Skull ID

    Suspect fish skull is about as specific as possible on this piece? Galveston Bay, Pleistocene.
  22. Fish/Reptile Skull Fragment?

    Collected from Galveston bay dredge spoils, late Pleistocene Beaumont formation. First thought was gar skull fragment but it lacks the central suture line evident in online photos. Hoping someone here might recognize it.
  23. Hi everybody, I am looking for a good and complete Hyneria tooth from the Devonian of Red Hill. Feel free to contact me if you have something nice. I can give good material, I have many stuff from the Solnhofen area and more. Best wishes from France :-) Frederic
  24. Picked this up at a show over the weekend and was wondering exactly what it is and if its real. Is it an Endochus jaw? The host rock is about 7 inches long and the logest jaw piece is about 4 inches long. Thanks! Eric
  25. Interestingly preserved Knightia?

    I found this really cool looking fish which is most likely a Knightia, but it's preserved in ventral aspect. The rear portion of the fish is missing including the dorsal fin so many of the diagnostic characteristics have been lost, but I still believe this is a Knightia based on the overall shape of the skull and the shape of the body. My question is more of a matter of ID'ing bones, because the main reason why I like this fish is you can see many of the bones that the typical Knightia does not show. I can see two operculum, one on each side. The lower and upper jaw I THINK are visible which is kind of weird because this is a ventral fish. The "gill" pieces which are my favorite part of the piece I think are called branchiostegals correct me if I'm wrong. But with many of the bones I have no clue. If anybody has input about this feel free to post what you have to say, I'm all ears!
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