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Found 1,087 results

  1. Rhizodus teeth

    Rhizodus is probably the most well known Carboniferous fish. I have seen Rhizodus teeth over 20cm in length, which shows the huge size this fish could reach. Fossils of Rhizodus are quite difficult to obtain due to their rarity and because most of them were found a long time ago. I do however have two teeth from Rhizodus. I intend to allow these teeth to be studied by experts if they are of interest to them. The first tooth is a tusk tooth from Newsham, Northumberland, England. It measures 37mm long. The second tooth is from Cowdenbeath, Fife, Scotland. I believe this comes from the Limestone Coal formation, Dora opencast. It measures 42mm.
  2. Sulphur River Texas

    I found a little bit of everything at my last Sulphur River Texas hunt. I really like the mosasaur flipper bone and the tiny vert.
  3. Fish remains?

    I feel like this is a smattering of disarticulated fish bones, but I'm not positive. The preservation is not amazing so even under magnification I'm not sure if these are bone or not. Found in Pennsylvanian black shale in Illinois. Any thoughts? @RCFossils Various levels of magnification
  4. Mystery Yorkshire Fish

    Hello Everyone, I found this eroded partial nodule while on a fossil hunt at Runswick Bay last year. I think it contains part of a fish but I'm not sure of the type. I've had a look at some other Yorkshire fish material, primarily Gyrosteus, but haven't seen anything like it yet. Most of the Gyrosteus material seems to be much bigger then whats in this block. I was wondering if anyone could help me identify what it is, I think I have sections of fin as well as possibly a cluster of ribs eroding out of the block. I've also included an annotated image of the front and back since the material is very difficult to pick out in pictures. I'm sure I have missed a few bits but I drew in everything I can see. Also, is there any way to prep this sort of material? The block is full of calcite veining so I assume manual preparation is near impossible, certainly well beyond my beginner abilities. Any and all information you can give me is greatly appreciated. Thank you, Benton
  5. Fish in the Rock

    I found this fish a few years ago in Stewart County Tn on the Tennessee River bank.
  6. New member w/fossil fish

    Hello fossil hunters, New guy with some prehistoric herring or something. Purchased in the 80's from some shopping mall science store that is no longer in existence. Just wondering if this is an easy ID as I think it might have been excavated hastily and maybe some fins, tails or details might be disrupted. I've tried to post up the biggest pic I can so I hope that makes IDing possible. Thanks
  7. Green River fish - what do we have here?

    I got this fish with some others in a trade deal the other day; I was supposed to get a mixed box of Diplomystus and Knightia, but this guy stood out for me. Doesn't look like either, and seems a bit too big for Amphiplaga. Maybe juvenile Mioplosus? Anybody? Is there another photo that can help? Thanks for looking!
  8. I've always been fascinated by the Cretaceous sea and its myriad of terrifying carnivores, many that would've made Jaws look meek. After watching BBC's Sea Monsters, I made it my goal to compile a box of sea monster fossils. I started this journey 10 years ago, and finally completed the box recently. Allow me to present my Predators of the Cretaceous Sea collection, and take you on a journey to the most dangerous sea of all times. The box measures 20.25 inches long. Inside are 24 unique predator fossils. I will introduce them from left to right, top to bottom: Rhombodus binkhorsti Age: 70.6 - 66 mya | late Cretaceous Formation: Severn Formation Locality: Bowie, Maryland, USA Size: 1 meters Diet: Molluscs and crustaceans art by Nobu Tamura --------------- Polyptychodon interruptus Age: 105.3 - 94.3 mya | Cretaceous Formation: Stoilensky Quarry stratigraphic unit Locality: Stary-Oskol, Belgorod Oblast, Russia Size: Maybe 7 meters (This is a tooth taxon so size is not confirmed) Diet: Anything it could catch Note: If you consider Polytychodon a nomen dubium, then this is a Pliosauridae indet. art by Mark Witton ----------------- Prognathodon giganteus Age: 70.6 - 66 mya | late Cretaceous Formation: Ouled Abdoun Basin Locality: Khouribga Phosphate Deposits, Morocco Size: 10-14 meters Diet: Everything art by SYSTEM(ZBrushCentral) --------------- Coloborhynchinae indet. Age: 99.7 - 94.3 mya | late Cretaceous Formation: Kem Kem Beds Locality: Southeast Morocco Size: 7 meters (high estimate) Diet: Fish and cephalopods
  9. Odd Albian Fish Tooth

    Any idea what the tooth on the left is? I know the other two are pycnodontids but I have never found anything like the one on the left. It is very cylindrical in cross section and has the odd "capped" end. Closest thing I could find in my reference library was a diplodicus tooth but this seems way to small. The site is in the Upper Glen Rose Formation (Albian) of Central Texas. This site has produced pycnodontids, turtle and crocodilian bones & teeth.
  10. Golf ball dimpled surface

    Can anyone help me with this one? Have found a lot of darker brown, nearly black ones also. Thought they were a shell of sorts but not sure
  11. With the current pandemic I decided now was as good of a time as any to get some matrix from the Aguja Formation with the help of PaleoTex! This turned out to be a great decision as I was extremely lucky, finding about basically everything I wanted to, and more in only 5 pounds of matrix! I'll be sure to post pictures but I got numerous amia and gar teeth, along with atleast 36 gar scales. Tons of Crocodile teeth including a large Deinosuchus tooth. Several shark teeth and a partial hybodus spine, also several brackish water pycnodontid teeth and tooth pallets. 4 fish or salamander jaws with teeth. Regarding dinosaur teeth I got 17 Hadrosaur teeth, including 2 partially rooted. A partial Ankylosaurus tooth. 4 Therapod teeth including a perfect Saurornitholestes tooth and a Premax. My favorite find however was the Paronychodon tooth I found! I'll be posting that picture first! Highly recommend this matrix, but I was also told that most people don't find all this stuff, so keep that in mind aswell. Stay safe! Happy hunting! (ID's for these specimens done by lab manager)
  12. Devonian Fish Scales New York?

    I found this odd piece in a grey shale layer in a place with devonian age matrix and fossils from new york with various layers from flakier layers compact with fossils to harder layers like this gray shale layer that this one thats not as compact with fossils as the other ones. I am unaware of devonian fish remains from new york and I usually do not notice odd minerals in the grey shale layer so this this piece baffles me, these small shiny "scales" sort of reminds me of how the devonian fish fossils of the old red sandstone of the uk kinda preserve but other than that I have no idea what else to compare this to. Any thoughts on this piece will be greatly appreciated as I've never come across anything like it at the site.
  13. Fossilised fish or odd bit of flint

    Found on Jurassic coast in Osmington Bay.
  14. Pohang, South Korea Fish fossil Miocene I don't know about species..
  15. Fossil fish wall

    Since I have had more time to get stuff done due to Corona virus downtime I finally put together a fossil fish wall. I collected the specimens a few years ago in Wyoming. Thought I would share
  16. NJ Cretaceous Stream backbone??

    Alright, last one for today! Picked up this concretion-ish piece and noticed the backbone type impression in it. I know its probably nothing, but danged if every time I look at it I see segmented vertebrae from a tail or something. I know this is wishful thinking, but what do you all think?
  17. Is it paint or natural?Priscacara liops Green River Formation?thanks
  18. Fish in a nodule needs ID

    Hi All, I bought a fossil fish on online a while ago. The seller identified it as "PTERONISCULUS Fish fossil Trias 250 mio Madagascar" It would be nice to confirm and also get additional information on possible locality, ideally reference to a scientific publication. I'm really curious about in situ conditions where the fossil was found. Could it be desert, or a mine. It seems like the fish nodules are not that rare if you look on-line but it's hard to find anything about the place of origin. Clearly, recognizing a fish species in this condition is a rare skill. So, many thanks in advance to those who will weigh in and share an opinion and information. Pictures are attached.
  19. Lee Creek Unknown

    Need some help from the experts on this one. I've been searching for something similar but have so far struck out. Found in some Lee Creek material from Eastern North Carolina. Scale is 1mm. What do you think?
  20. Upper Devonian Skull? Cashaqua Shale Member, Sonyea Group Western New York size - matrix block is 8" x 8" I found this fossil around 12 years ago. The locality it was found at is a nodule layer with well preserved coiled/straight shelled nautiloids, petrified wood (some very large), small gastropods, small pelecypods and that's about it. I have found one other weathered piece of bone before at this locality but this nodule, I knew when found it, that it was special. It needs to be prepared and would love to get it done. That is the reason I took it out of the mothballs. First, I would like to know exactly what it is. I'm thinking very early fish skull. My question to you is - what species is it and is it fish or something else like an amphibian? I know we are dealing with bone and not wood or something else from the Upper Devonian. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Happy Collecting from Mikeymig
  21. Here are my new fossils! And how my collection looks now. For size comparison the enchodus tooth to the right in the picture of the entire collection is 5,6cm long (2.2 Inches long)
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