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Found 367 results

  1. I'm having a hard time ID'ing this fish. There's little to no info on it either. Any help is appreciated.
  2. Hot North Sulphur River hunt. I followed some footprints but still managed a nice variety.
  3. From the album @Max-fossils 's Zandmotor Finds

    A partial fish jaw found on the Zandmotor, with one tooth (shiny black thing). Probably from a bream (Sparidae).
  4. other than the fact its 13inchs head to tail that is all I know about it. Any help would be great- thanks.
  5. Looking at trading my large collection of Eocene shark teeth, ray fossils, and fish fossils from the Nanjemoy Formation of Muddy Creek in Virginia. Looking to trade for rare species of shark teeth or shark teeth from rare locations. I have broken down what is included in the collection below and will post pictures of some of the highlights of the collection in the upcoming posts. All fossils are complete with no repair or restoration. Message me if interested. Here are a couple of links about the location: http://www.elasmo.com/frameMe.html?file=paleo/va/va_eoc.html&menu=bin/menu_fauna-alt.html https://www.dmme.virginia.gov/commercedocs/PUB_152.pdf Fossils included in the collection: Shark Material Striatolamia macrota - 100+ Anomotodon novus & Anomotodon sheppeyensis - 100+ Serratolamna lerichei - 50+ Hypotodus verticalis - 37x Carcharias sp. - 36x Sylvestrilamia teretidens - 22x Odontaspis winkleri - 25x Jaekelotodus robustus - 7x Palaeohypotodus rutoti - 1x Cretalamna appendiculata - 5x Isurolamna inflata - 4x Ginglymostoma sp. and Nebrius sp. - 23x Squatina prima - 19x Megasqualus orpiensis and Squalus crenatidens - 4x Premontria sp. - 17x Palaeogaleus vincenti - 17x Scyliorhinus gilberti - 13x Triakis wardi - 7x Physogaleus secundus - 50+ Pachygaleus lefevrei - 15x Galeorhinus ypresiensis - 5x Rhizoprionodon sp. - 32x Abdounia beaugei - 100+ Abdounia minutissima - 100+ Unidentified sp. - 4x Shark vertebra - 1x Ray Material Ray plate bars of various sp. - 100+ including one partial plate Ray teeth of various sp - 100+ Dermal denticles - 21x Stingray barb - 1x Fish Material Fish teeth of various species (including cutlass, barracuda, drum, others) - 100+ Various fish bones - 50+ Anoxypristis sp. - 1x Striatolamia macrota Anomotodon novus & Anomotodon sheppeyensis
  6. Hi, I am just wondering if you could tell me what you think this is? Kind regards Jack
  7. Is this a fossilized fish?? Help anyone? Kim Approximately 1 foot in length
  8. On June 3rd and 4th I ditched my regular hunting grounds for the opportunity to meet up with a forum member @Seve78 at one of the Pay to Dig quarries in Kemmerer, Wyoming. Tom chose to spend Saturday at Warfield Quarry and Sunday with me at American Fossil (AKA Fish Dig) which is run by our very own TFF member @sseth Tom was an absolute pleasure to dig with and he filled his suitcase with literally tons of treasures to take home, I would meet up again in a heartbeat! I arrived at 9:30am on Saturday and spent about 4 hours helping to prep the site for Tom on Sunday. I split down some of the larger blocks that had been pulled from the wall to allow them to dry. For those of you that have not been to Kemmerer for fish yet, the rock has to be AS DRY AS POSSIBLE, or else it is just a mushy mess that WILL NOT split! Dry rocks are near impossible to achieve with just 1 day of digging! Upon Tom's arrival at around 8:00am of Sunday we got to work! Here is Tom starting his search through some of the rock that had been pulled! Here is a picture of the area I was working. I brought my long chisels and a couple of short ones for good measure. Along with 3 hammers and nippers for trimming down my finds. Both halves of a nice multi plate presented themselves for me about 3 hours in! Once all the rock had been pulled it was time to trim them up for transport. Trusty old table saw, the fastest way in the west to lose a finger! My haul after just 6 hours of total digging time was pretty impressive. All trimmed up and laid out on the table ready to go home, these finds were all delivered to the Morrison Museum of Natural History in Morrison, CO. I wanted them to have some fish for their collections and left everything as found so they could try their hands at prep! The big fish on the front of the table is a 90% complete Phareodus. This is a relatively small one, they could reach up to about 25 inches in length! I left this one with Patrick to give to Seth, maybe he can make something of it! My find of the day though was also my smallest...a Juvenile Amphiplaga brachyptera... This is the RAREST fish the Pay to Dig quarries will let you keep, and only my second one ever found in 4 years of digging Green River fishies. They do not present in the 18" layer I usually dig, only the split fish layers. I found a full grown adult measuring in at just over 5 inches and now this juvenile to add to my collection. I don't usually post much for FOTM, but this guy is headed that way! Whether he wins or not though, he has made me one happy digger! If anyone else is down for a meet-up shoot me a PM! I will be heading back to Seth's quarry on June 24-25 and always love to meet fellow TFF members! Hope you all enjoyed my trip report, see you soon! -Blake As I was leaving the quarry, we had some furry guests waiting in line for their turn to dig up some fishies!
  9. I am not Shure what this vertebrae is from. I think maby a mosasaur vertebrae but I am not sure.
  10. I found what appears to be a fish vertebrae last week on the beach. I was wondering if it is a fossil and if any one had any idea what the size of the fish it would have come from. To me it seems like it had to be a nice size fish.
  11. I found this tooth and about 4 outlets like it in the chalk of Kansas today. It almost feels square and like a bone .
  12. I found this jaw bone in the chalk of Kansas and I have no idea what it came from .i am pretty Shure it's a fish as I only really find fish bones out where I hunt. Let me know what you think. It is hard to see but there are about 8 tooth studs in the bone.
  13. I think this is a vertebrae but of what I do not know I have no clue on this one.
  14. Hello Fossil Fans, I found this fossil at a flea market in Paris this week. The seller said he'd gotten it from a collector who told him it was from Brazil and between 270 and 300 million years old. To me, it looks like the fish is curled up in a ball, or folded. What do you see? Any info would be great! Thanks.
  15. found this in some stones piles at my house. if this isnt a fossil its a really ironic shaped rock. heres one size. i have to post the other side in a comment cuz for some reason the more pics i take the higher the mbs are happening. any input would be great! heres the other side.
  16. Is it possible that not all the creatures we call fish are actually fish?
  17. WHAT WE LEARNED IN OUR FIRST FOSSIL HUNTING SUMMER This is a short recap of what we learned on our fossil trips this summer, in our first 3 months as very new fossil collectors. This week, Nancy and I gave a slide presentation on our summer fossil hunting experiences, to the Delaware Valley Paleontological Society. We didn't realize it ourselves but in 3 months we visited 8 sites in Pennsylvania and New York including: Antes Creek, Deer Lake, Red Hill, Juniata County, McIntyre Mountain, Montour and St. Clair in Pennsylvania, and a very productive trip to Tully, NY. We visited St. Clair 4 times, which has become our home site. At St. Clair, we were astonished by the diversity of species - we collected well articulated samples of more than a dozen species including: Alethopteris, Annularia, Asterophyllites, Cordaites, Cyclopteris, Eusphenopteris, Lepidophylloides, Neuropteris, Odontopteris, Pecopteris, Sphenophyllum, Sphenopteris, and numerous Seeds, Bark, Roots. Most notably - I learned to pronounce all of these without stuttering! At St. Clair, we spent one trip looking exclusively for seeds trigonocarpus), and one trip looking just for roots (stigmaria). Our most significant finds have included very large (2 foot long) display pieces covered with well articulated orange ferns, an alethopteris seed attached to a leaf stem, and many Carboniferous leaves that have different shapes from traditional ferns. What we learned this summer has really helped us find some interesting fossils - here are a few things we did that helped a lot: 1. DOING OUR HOMEWORK. It helped to study each site in advance using Internet websites and books on fossils (Dave's "Views of the Mahantango" and "Louisville Fossils" are among the best, imho). Several universities also have great educational sites that bring each era to life in very creative and interesting ways, with lots of illustrations and photos. I like the UC-Berkeleyand University of West Virginia websites. 2. LEARNING FROM TRIP REPORTS. We read trip reports from other groups and individuals to see what they reported - sometimes this helps us stumble across new places to visit such as the site at Tully, NY and Deer Lake. 3. SETTING GOALS AND TARGETS FOR EACH TRIP. For each trip, we establish specific goals - for example we may look for seeds, or roots at St. Clair, or trilobites or shell assemblages at a Devonian site. Our interest right now is in looking for things that are scarce or rare, and fossils that are extremely well articulated (which is also rare!). We also like solving puzzles so eventually we would like to find things that help add to the fossil record in areas where there are still questions or missing links. 4. DISPLAYING WHAT WE FIND. Personally, Nancy and I like collecting larger fossils that we can display in mounts and frames, and we are also looking for larger pieces that we can display like sculptures - we have a few pieces that we drilled holes in, inserted wooden dowels that we stained, and then drilled/inserted the dowels in wooden trophy bases - all available from a craft store. This allows us to display thicker fossils esp. assemblages, like sculptures, and you can turn them around and look at all sides when they are mounted like this. 5. WE AVOID FOSSIL HORDING. We both agreed that we would NOT become "fossil horders" putting hundreds of rocks in boxes and sticking them away in the basement or garage - instead, we focus on finding display-quality items, and rare or scarce finds which we are slowly putting in frames. 6. DOCUMENTING OUR FINDS WITH CLOSEUP PHOTOS. We photograph everything we find as soon as possible after returning from a trip, using a digital camera with a closeup attachment - many times we find new discoveries while taking closeup photos and some of our best finds came AFTER we returned from the trip and inspected our fossils. I usually put the finds on a white background on an ironing board and use window light, nothing fancy, but it works. 7. FOSSIL ID. We post anything we can't identify on the Fossil Forum and are EXTREMELY grateful for the terrific response from our friends on the site! We are also accumulating a growing library of fossil books (some modern, some from the 19th and early 20th century) so we can identify more fossils ourselves without having to post on Fossil ID. 8. WRITING ABOUT OUR EXPERIENCES GIVES US NEW INSIGHTS. We report everything that interests and excites us about fossil hunting on Fossil Forum to share our experiences - and we find that writing about what we're doing helps us learn more and gain insights, just from writing about it. We have also started videotaping some of our adventures and are thinking about the best place to post some of these. 9. WINTER PLANS: COPING WITH CABIN FEVER. Our winter plans are to visit one or two more sites, then go into "fossil hibernation" and organize, identify and label fossils we haven't processed yet. We have a Dremel to do some light preservation work where needed. We are not planning to become "chemical conservators" - using chemicals to dissolve limestone and so forth - that's a bit too ambitious for us at this point. We may get involved in some interesting activities by local universities that are using 3D printing to process and replicate large dinosaur bones. We are also planning to provide an exhibit (on Carboniferous plants and trees/coal swamps) at a fossil fair in April. 10. RECOMMENDED READING: I enjoy reading fossil books - I'm currently reading with great interest a small book entitled "Leaves and Stems from Fossil Forests" by Raymond E. Janssen (1939) which I bought last night at the DVPS meeting, and a textbook entitled Introduction to Paleobiology and the Fossil Record by Benton and Harper (2008) (excellent book). The book that has been the most useful to me so far is the classic book "Fossil Collecting in Pennsylvania" by Hoskins et. al. (3rd ed. 1983). I am constantly re-reading the Hoskins book and find something new each time as my knowledge grows. A book that impressed Nancy and me is a large beautifully illustrated book entitled "Prehistoric Life: The Definitive Visual History of Life on Earth" (published by Dorling Kindersley, 2012) UPDATE (Oct 11): Nancy is taking some college courses which are prerequisites to enter grad school, so I am doing most of the fossil reading and ID. I read several books at the same time and other books I purchased that I am currently reading are: Paleobotany: The Biology and Evolution of Fossil Plants (second edition) by Thomas Taylor; and Introduction to Paleobiology and the Fossil Record by Benton and Harper. I guess you can tell from this that I'm reading up on fossil plants - my main interest is not just to understand the evolution and fossil record, identification tips, etc. - but also to try to figure out where the missing links and gaps are so if we come across something that adds to the fossil record, we will be able to recognize the value. What is most surprising is that there is a lot missing from the Carboniferous record - partly because after this period, many of the oceans and swamps apparently dried up and there were ice ages and other factors that caused mass extinctions. Here are some interesting things I have learned this summer about Fossil Plants and Trees: 1. More Carboniferous insect fossils and evidence of insects are needed (by the way, there are some GREAT current discussions about insects on this forum!). 2. Many categories of lycopsids and other Carboniferous trees and plants do not have verified associations between the leaves and seeds, or leaves and trunks/stems. Many trigonocarpus (fossilized seeds and "fruits") are found with leaves, but examples of seeds actually ATTACHED to leaf sprigs are rare (we have found one example of a seed attached to Alethopteris). 3. More Leaf and Bark Verifications are Needed. Another interesting thing I learned is that there are more than 30 different types of "scale tree" patterns but only half a dozen leaves for these trees - suggesting that a lot of different species had the same leaves - or - there are a lot of missing leaf types or the existing leaf types have not been matched to the bark patterns yet. 4. Another peculiar revelation is that most Carboniferous leaves that do not fall neatly into classic fern shapes seem to be lumped together as "sphenopteris" - we have many "non-traditional fern" leaf fossils that are VERY different from each other and obviously different species, but when we go online to ID them, they all seem to be grouped as "sphenopteris!" Maybe some of these leaf types match up with the bark patterns I mentioned. 5. Last but certainly not least is the insight that fern trees could have 2 or 3 different types of leaves on the same tree! This was really interesting. Also, some leaf types can come in different shapes - for example, Neuropteris can be round at the base of a stem and elongated along the stem and at the tip...AND...some paleobotanists now classify cyclopteris - the round fan shaped leaf - as a form of Neuropteris. This definitely adds to the confusion. I'm still reading and trying to understand all of this and these are only my initial impressions, which are still forming and there may be explanations for some of these questions that I haven't discovered yet but these are the questions that I am trying to answer by reading, and of course, by fossil collecting. I hope that many of our new friend (and I should add, VERY COOL new friends!) on the fossil forum will help clarify some of these interesting questions. Hope this is helpful.
  18. Made my first trip up to Wyoming to visit the fish quarry this weekend. Everything went well, but the rocks are still a bit wet. We spent most of the time removing junk to get to our good productive layers! The main mission of the trip was not to dig, but to see how the winter had treated us! Below is a picture of the quarry Our digging platform for the split fish is right behind that truck and trailer. We moved the trailer up this year to house our finds and our gear! Of course....being such a gorgeous day and only about 16°C or 17°C we couldn't help but dig up some fish! After just a couple of hours of digging we had a pile of nice fish to bring back home and after trimming them up you can see our spoils! The real catch of the day though took us by surprise! It was a perfectly preserved bug!! Not uncommon in the Green River layers, but one like this has never been seen before! It is headed over to Fossil Butte to be examined by the Curator there and hopefully he has some fun news for us! If you look close you can see one wing spread out, all the legs preserved and even big, long, gorgeous antenna! This is one primo bug! Hope you guys enjoyed my report (I know it is short) but keep your eyes peeled for more Green River Adventures! -Blake
  19. Helllo friendly folks of the fossil forum, I have been searching for a coelacanth fossil on and off for years now. I finally found one that preserved all the characteristic fin "limbs" in profile from an Ebayer who acquired it while in Madagascar. I was pleased with the degree of preservation on both split halves. To my surprise, taking a hand lens to the more concave side revealed scale preservation. I know this is typical of bony fish with scutes like Gars from the Green River, WY - but! Is this unusually good for nodules in Madagascar? More to the point, am I keeping something away from the scientific eye that should be seeing this? I imagine 3-D scanning could reveal finer details for comparison to the living fossil ancestor today. Attached are photos taken with my iPhone and two photos through a regular light microscope at 2x magnification. Thank you for any advice or knowledge you may have on these classes of coelacanths. Warmly, Mark
  20. Hello everyone, I went out this weekend in the Oligocene of southern France to look for fishes. I have found some, but I have many questions since they are my first fish fossils and I am having several problems for preparation, and stabilisation. First here are some examples of fossils found: Some of the layer are extremely thin (as paper) and the fossil start to ondulate as long as it gets dry and I was wondering how could I overcome this problem? Some of them are more thicker, but still ondulating. My second question is how do I prepare them in order to keep the bones? I have tried to prepare small chunks, but as long as I separate the two layers its very hard to keep all the bones intact. I have tried with some HCl, but it doesn't gets through the most blacky parts, which are the richest in OM. Maybe a small schisel ? Before starting to do anything I wanted to have some advices from you guys. Thanks for your help !
  21. Found this on a local private beach in York VA. Not sure of the formation but Miocene I'm assuming, seems younger than the St. Mary's fmn ive collected extensively here and I've found a few mammal teeth (horse and bison) but no shark teeth on this particular area. I was collecting primarily cute cute little oyster cluster, the occasional barnacle clusters, as well as some cool branching bryzoans. And then this thing pops up. I've found modern fish spine sections here regularly and they're always white or rust stained due to fats, but this is obv darker and heavier, but but not truly 100% "stone / fossilized". any thoughts? thx in advance!!!
  22. Anyone know the species of this fish? Skull is 3D and BIG. Thanks
  23. Ok it looks like a prety geological creation, but then there is this (photo 3) is it just a shell mold, or could it be some breathing organ thing, coz it is placed lower. And this (photo 4) that is on the highest of the 3 peaks that are formed and sort of reminds me of a mouth with teeth. Found near akrotiri, ayios ermoyenis - curium area cliffs. Its 25cm long and the center 17cm high, it looks like hmm some sort of triple fin, or fish or exploding angry eel ... something that belongs to the sea anyway some more photos next post
  24. Hello everone, Thank you in advance. This is my first post so bear with me if I don't give the proper information needed or if my photos aren't sufficient. I think this is a fossil? Possibly some sort of fish? Found on the Los Angeles coast in San Pedro area of california. I'm posting two photos but because of the size I couldn't post the rest. I will try to post more in another post on this thread. Thank you again, Amy
  25. Okey donkey, my sister just brought this to me. Found hiking in a dry riverbed in Paso Robles, California. The area and rock tell me it is Monterey Shale Formation (Miocene). I said it looks to be fish, but the size of the ribs don't seem to fluctuate which would make it a long creature. Now there is an outcropping of Pipefish about 15 miles south of here, could it be one or ? As you can see from my hand, it is about a 1 1/2" long vertibral column. Thanks, caldigger