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Found 601 results

  1. Can anyone here identify this fossil? I am new to this fossil hunting and trying to learn more.
  2. From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order LittorinimorphaFamily NaticidaeNaticarius castrenoides (Woodring, 1928)Location: SMR Phase 10 pit (Pinecrest Sand Member), Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: ExtinctNotes: Large and one of the most common naticids within the Tamiami Formation. Globose with distinct lines radiating from the suture. Sometimes found with the original shelly operculum.
  3. From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order LittorinimorphaFamily NaticidaeNaticarius castrenoides (Woodring, 1928)Location: Quality Aggregates (Pinecrest Sand Member), Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: ExtinctNotes: Not as inflated as N. plicatella and the radial lines from the suture not as profound. Common within Caribbean Pliocene faunas.
  4. From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order LittorinimorphaFamily NaticidaeNaticarius cf. canrena (Linnaeus, 1758)Location: Quality Aggregates (Pinecrest Sand Member), Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: ExtantNotes: This immature and crabbed shell is most similar to the Colorful or Gaudy Moon Snail. Compare to recent N. canrena.
  5. From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order LittorinimorphaFamily NaticidaePolinices caroliniana (Conrad, 1841)Location: APAC (Pinecrest Sand Member), Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: ExtinctNotes: Glossy shell higher than wide with an open and distinctive umbilicus. Also found the Duplin Formation.
  6. From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order LittorinimorphaFamily NaticidaeStigmaulax guppiana (Toula, 1909)Location: Quality Aggregates (Pinecrest Sand Member), Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: ExtinctNotes: Distinct lines radiating from the suture to the umbilicus. A wide-spread species found in the Pliocene of the Caribbean and Central America.
  7. From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order LittorinimorphaFamily NaticidaeStigmaulax polypum Olsson & Harbinson, 1953)Location: SMR Phase 10 (Pinecrest Sand Member), Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: ExtinctNotes: Smaller and taller than S. guppiana. Faint lines radiating from the suture.
  8. From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order LittorinimorphaFamily NaticidaeSigatica bathyora (Woodring, 1928)Location: APAC (Pinecrest Sand Member), Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: ExtinctNotes: Distinctively shaped rare shell with large uncovered umbilicus.
  9. From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order LittorinimorphaFamily NaticidaeDallitesta coensis (Dall, 1903)Location: Quality Aggregates (Pinecrest Sand Member), Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: ExtinctNotes: Taller than wide. Well preserved shells are glossy with a partially covered umbilicus.
  10. From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order LittorinimorphaFamily NaticidaeEuspra perspectiva (Rogers & Rogers, 1837)Location: Immokalee (Golden Gate Member), Collier County, Florida USA. Status: ExtinctNotes: Small shell, relatively high naticid with partially covered umbilicus.
  11. From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order LittorinimorphaFamily NaticidaeNeverita duplicata (Say, 1822)Location: SMR Phase 10 (Pinecrest Member), Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: ExtantNotes: Aka Common Atlantic Shark Eye. Compare to recent N. duplicate.
  12. From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order LittorinimorphaFamily NaticidaeTectonatica pusilla (Say, 1822)Location: SMR Phase 8 (Pinecrest Sand Member), Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: ExtinctNotes: Tiny shell with covered umbilicus.
  13. From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order LittorinimorphaFamily NaticidaeSinum perspectivum (Say, 1831)Location: SMR Phase 10 (Pinecrest Member), Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: ExtantNotes: Aka Common Baby Ear. Compare to modern examples of S. perspectivum.
  14. From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order LittorinimorphaFamily NaticidaeSinum polandi (M. Smith, 1936)Location: SMR Phase 10 (Pinecrest Member), Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: ExtinctNotes: Similar to Sinum perspectivum but taller and more inflated.
  15. Acquired in a trade in 1999 from a site that no longer exists.
  16. From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order [unassigned] Caenogastropoda Family CerithiidaeCerithium preatratum Olsson & Harbinson, 1953Location: Bonita Grande Pit (Golden Gate Member), Lee County, Florida USA. Status: ExtinctNotes: This image of a better preserved specimen replaces MR 9440-1016 posted previously.
  17. From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order LittorinimorphaFamily StrombidaeLobatus leidyi (Heilprin, 1886)Location: Bonita Grande Pit (Golden Gate Member), Lee County, Florida USA. Status: ExtinctNotes: A common species in the Lower Caloosahatchee Formation, it is also found in the Upper Pliocene Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation. Compare to an excellently preserved specimen from the Caloosahatchee Formation. LINK
  18. Here are my most recent finds from a trip out to Venice Beach. I found a large variation of color of sharks teeth and bone fragments. I also found a small piece of what appears to be some type of equine tooth, a small unknown possibly reptilian tooth, a vertebra, and some other odds and ends. This beach has a very wide variation of fossils and we had a great time hunting. A big thanks goes to JCBShark for lending some gear and giving me a piece of meg to take to my daughter! She was thrilled.
  19. What are these fossils I have found them in Gainesville Florida in hog town creek I have no idea what they are.
  20. This morning I had an unexpected day off from work and decided to head to Gainesville's creeks. I've done this many, many times before as I've been hunting fossils most of my life- Today I was approached by a member of City of Gainesville Department of Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs. I had only just arrived and started to dig below the waterline as I always do; but she educated me that there is a rule within the municipal city limits of Gainesville, stating that "no designated city park should allow creek access or digging in creeks within park boundaries." This is part of a larger conservation and erosion control effort by local habitat management. I made sure to be very cooperative and polite (as you ALWAYS should be), and I left after a very pleasant conversation with her. She agreed to research the issue and find out if there are ways to get access to the creeks within park boundaries via permit etc. Meanwhile, I called the number listed on my Florida fossil hunting permit and verified that the information I had been given was correct. The only "public access" to any Gainesville creeks is from the roadside at any point where the creeks intersect the road. From there, you can access them without touching private property. You must not go on the banks on either side as that IS private property. You may wade the creek and hunt, but never within a city park or private property without permission. I am literally posting this while I sit in a parking lot reviewing maps for alternate access. In the spirit of responsible hobby-hunting, conservation of Florida's wetlands and education, I wanted to share this information with you all. Happy Hunting!
  21. Recently Mrs. beachbum and myself met up with Sir Tommy the Toad in Gainesville for a quick hunt. We met at a spot where Sir Tommy showed us a creek that produces some nice fossils. That's a neat little spot I look forward to hunting with Sir Tommy. From there we went to a favorite creek of mine. It's a hit or miss spot, but after the recent rains you can't say no. The three of us work the creek for a while before Sir Tommy had to leave. We stayed a bit more along with a guest before the rains returned. We didn't do to bad for the amount of time there and now we're looking forward to heading back.
  22. My girlfriend, Valerie and I were visiting my aunt in West Palm Beach, Florida. She is 90 and lives in a senior residence. I wasn't planning to go fossil hunting or even thinking about fossils. However, on our last night there, we were walking in the neighborhood to burn off a few calories when I spotted a number of fossil shells in front of an apartment complex. We spent about half an hour searching the shells for complete ones in good condition- found over twenty species. Valerie got into it too and found some excellent specimens. After that we began spotting fossil shells everywhere. It's amazing how much you don't see unless you're really looking. Since this isn't our usual stomping ground- could use some ID help with these:
  23. Hello Gang. I'm not sure if fossiling takes your focus off what you should be doing like it does me but yesterday I was supposed to be clearing an area out to make space for an upcoming wood working project. Well that exercise turned more into opening boxes and looking at fossils stored there and reliving why I had brought some of them home. It was a good thing and a bad thing! As many of you know the Tamiami formation has a boat load of invertebrate species and its fairly easy to acquire a bunch of material quickly so here are several shots to share with you all of some of the variants I've brought home over the past several years---Sarasota County, Plio-Pleistocene. There are occasionally also some pretty nice shark teeth that you can run across in the various spoil finds. Here are several of the common types I've found..Mako, Tiger, Meg and Carcharhinus sp. types... There are a number of barnacles and I'm fascinated by the different types but its the associated attachments that they are found on that really gets my eye. I believe here's a Ceratoconcha sp. group that has latched on to a good sized bone fragment and a Chesaconcavus sp. on a coral branch. I've picked up lots of damaged shells and here are two gastropods with showing what I believe are some type of shell repair. The larger one somehow survived the massive damage..I've read about how crabs have sometimes inflicted these wounds so if thats the case the crab must have been fairly good sized one. The smaller guy has some small damage near the tip of the spire and along the aperature. I'm intrigued by just general shapes and coloration differences so here's a few examples of some gastropods Neverita sp. and Chesapecten sp. that came home. The last shot is my favorite from the day...a Vasum (Hystrivasum) that has sponge boring damage, a good sized Balanus sp. growing on the spire and if you look close you can see small boring clams still in their bore holes on the top left of the specimen just beneath the barnacle. All for now. Hope you enjoy. Back to woodworking! LOL. Continued hunting success to you all! Regards, Chris
  24. Hello! I've been lurking these forums for ages and made this account just to see if you all can figure this one out. I've found this tooth many years ago when I was a kid off of Apollo Beach, Florida. I think the beach is actually closed now, but of the few teeth I have from there this one always stood out. I've only got this one picture, as I've recently moved and the little bugger has been packed away in storage. I found this pic again on my laptop and my curiosity about it was peaked once more. I'm only a novice collector but I'm thinking it's a disfigured bull shark tooth? It's about the size of a quarter and very bent in places, and the blade is very flat as if it's been compressed. Any ideas on it would be helpful!
  25. Found these items in a rock from Bone Valley in Florida. Any help would be appreciated.