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Found 846 results

  1. Layers, layers. Need help to ID

    I found this walking the beach near South Ponte Vedra, FL. I have no clue what it is. Can you help?
  2. East Coast fossil road trip

    Hello! Later this year I'm planning on moving from Florida back to New England. I was hoping to make the voyage into an interesting road trip... I've heard of several places in the Eastern half of the US where you can dig your own fossils. I know that there are some places in Georgia and the Carolinas that are good to find Megalodon teeth, and some places in the northern US that are good for finding trilobites... I'm up for anything interesting and was looking for suggestions on exact places, tour companies, people, anything that you can offer that might extend my collection on the trip!
  3. Hey guys, a while back I found this amazing chunk of bone after dredge was dropped off for Irma restoration of my beach. I took it in to the NHM of Florida in Gainesville where I had people examine it. We found it not to be giant ground sloth but either Mastodon or Mammoth, and after lookin at some bones I decided it was probably Mastodon. I wanted your guy's imput on the bone. We know it's leg, but which bone? Let me know! Attached below is a link with video showing off the angles better along with photos.
  4. Clathrodrillia emmonsi

    Kittle, B. Alex, Roger W. Portell, Harry G. Lee and Sean Roberts. 2013. Mollusca Nashua Formation (Late Pliocene to Early Pleistocene). Florida Fossil Invertebrates Part 15, 40pp.
  5. Vexillum willcoxi

    Not reported from the Nashua by Kittle, Portell, Lee and Roberts (2013)
  6. Found this guy today and wanted your imput. Is it turtle? If not, then what? Let me know!
  7. I found this bad boy today and wanted your opinion on it. I'm leaning Mako here, what do you think?
  8. What do you guys think?
  9. Carcharocles megalodon 05

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles megalodon Bone Valley, Florida Bite damage with marks visible ....
  10. Since the upload of Part 1 succeeded, I'll now offer up Part 2, a look at two interesting taxa from the family Globigerinidae. This family contains most of the taxa that we associate with the idea of "planktonic forams", perhaps due to our familiarity with the "globigerina oozes" that form a significant part of the floor of the modern world oceans. Globigerinoides ruber (d’Orbigny, 1839) is one of the two “red” species of globigerinids, as the specific epithet indicates. It is well-known that the color of individual specimens varies from white to pinkish-red, and it is typically the case that only some of its globular chambers exhibit the red coloration. I have specimens with all white chambers, one red chamber, two red chambers, etc., and have a single individual that is all red. Interestingly, the intensity of the color seems to increase with the number of chambers affected, so the all red specimen is very red indeed -- it is also a little smaller than average. Here is a typical specimen seen from the umbilical side, in a slightly oblique view, showing the primary aperture and one red chamber: The genus Globigerinoides differs from Globigerina in that its species exhibit secondary apertures, formed at the junctions of the spiral suture with intercameral sutures: Here is the spiral side of the same specimen, again presented in an oblique view, with two supplementary apertures, two red chambers at the left, and a pale pink one at the right. The top, final chamber is white, as is most frequently the case. This taxon is the commonest foram in the sample, by a large margin. The other red globigerinid is Globoturborotalita rubescens (Hofker, 1956). According to the World Foraminifera Database, it also occurs in the Gulf of Mexico, but I have seen no specimens in my sample as yet. This taxon shows four chambers in the umbilical view, rather than three, and lacks the secondary apertures. A second interesting globigerinid, quite different from the preceding, is Globigerinella siphonifera (d’Orbigny, 1839). This genus exhibits planispiral forms, rather than trochospiral -- all of the chambers are in the same plane. (Actually, the test begins growth in a trochospire, but quickly switches growth pattern to planispiral.) There is a primary aperture at the base of the final chamber, and in fully mature specimens like this one, the initial chambers enter the final one through the primary aperture: The final chamber appears to be “gobbling up” the initial chambers, like the snake that swallows its own tail. In Part 3 of this entry, I’ll examine three taxa from the Family Globorotaliidae. Stay tuned.......
  11. Planktonic Foraminifera are particularly important in biostratigraphic studies and correlation, as they are ubiquitous in marine deposits, and evolve rapidly. They first appeared in Middle Jurassic time, and thus have a long geological history. There are many phylogenetic and correlational studies available, and their rapid evolution makes them exceptionally useful as temporal markers, or guide fossils. I am currently looking at planktonic Foraminifera from a deep-water sample that was collected from the Dry Tortugas Islands, off of the coast of southern Florida. The sample was dredged from a depth of 215 meters, due south of the islands. This is an interesting area, as it represents the eastern extremity of the Gulf of Mexico, as well as the northern edge of the Caribbean Sea. The sample is a very rich one, with numerous species of benthic Foraminifera, as well as a few ostracodes. There is a good selection of planktonic forams -- I have thus far identified ten species, and would like to discuss one of these, a member of the Family Pulleniatinidae. Pulleniatina obliquiloculata (Parker & Jones, 1862) is a rather unusual looking taxon, starting with a trochospiral growth pattern, but switching to a streptospiral pattern for its final chambers. It is globulose, and quite shiny, making it easy to recognize. It took me some time to locate a specimen for imaging, as most specimens have their aperture clogged with matrix. The aperture is low, but very broad, and the apertural surface of the chamber below it is strongly pustulose. If this image were rotated toward the viewer a bit it would be clear that a thin area just above the lip of the aperture (seen here as an imperforate band) also bears pustules, although they are not as strong as those beneath the aperture. For those interested in taxonomy, this species is the generotype of Pulleniatina. I am submitting this short blog entry to see if the recent problems with uploading to the forum have been fixed. If so, I'll be submitting other entries on this sample.
  12. I found this on the beach and though it is a bone fragment. But then, when I turned it over, the texture confused me. Can someone help? Thank you!
  13. Location/searching peace river first time

    Hello! We will be traveling to cocoa beach and driving to Tampa then making a stop in Venice beach starting next Saturday. I have been reading information on searching the peace river and this will be our first time. I want to make sure we do this right, does anyone have any advice or guidance? We do not have any equipment but will go buy some and are willing to. I did look up the river water level and currently it is 12in under, which I read is good for fossil gathering. We have our fossil permits for Florida. I have talked to my club up here in Michigan and oddly enough not too many people have gone collecting in Florida. Also, are there any good spots along the river we can go to or any good spots in Florida you'd recommend? We are only looking for personal small collection and arnt looking to widespread the information or locations. And it might be a long stretch but is there anywhere we might get lucky with agatized coral? As well, does anyone have any opinions on Rucks pit in Okeechobee? Have heard mixed reviews and that most is picked over... Any information will be super appreciated! Thank you, Anna-marie
  14. Tooth ID

    I found this partial tooth at Peace River and I'm having some trouble definitively IDing it. I think it may be some type of cetacean.
  15. Limb? bone Reptilian? Florida

    Hoping this isnt too incomplete up to ID. Was in the dugong scrap garage box but I'm pretty sure now it shouldnt have been....Anyone recognize what it actually is and what it belongs to? It has a nice twisted shape to it. The base is relatively flat and seems to be only very slightly worn. The opposite end seems to have been pretty much sheared off and has an interesting groove remaining that I've circled in red. Thanks for the looks and any info you might be able to provide. Latest thought is that its reptilian, possibly a gator, maybe an ulna? Regards, Chris
  16. Small Mammal teeth, Shark vert

    I was hunting in a lot of smaller gravel (almost Pea gravel) and thus found many smaller fossils.. Here are 3 of the one I was unsure of the identity. All suggestions and comments appreciated. Jack Fossil #1 Mammal tooth Fossil #2 Mammal Incisor Finally #3 a shark vert...
  17. Jacksonville FL Shark tooth

    Its pretty small-thought it was a bull or dusky or something similar, but I found lots of bull etc teeth today and it doesn't look like any of them. The angles aren't as steep as the bulls or whatever. The tip is missing but it appears to only be missing the tip and some root. Thanks for your help everyone!
  18. Looking for an Invert spot

    Hey guys, I haven't been able to get out and about to my fossil sites this season, I have had far too much school work and regular work. Heck, I've even neglected the forums(sorry about that.) This is my final year...well, I'll probably pursue my master's but that's another story, anyway, I'm looking for an off the grid invert site. Looking at my fossil collection, the one thing it lacks is invertebrate Florida fossils...who would have thought that I would have too many vertebrate fossils in Florida lol! Anyway, if you have a good spot, we can trade spots, I can hook you up with some vert stuff, or you can take comfort in knowing that a Mosaic geologist owes you a favor.(kind of like an investment that will pay off big in 8 or 9 months) Just shoot me a message and we can work something out. -J
  19. Tooth From Peace River

    Any help will be appreciated on ID of this tooth, Found in Peace River north of Brownville.
  20. MEGALODON GIANT SHARK TOOTH a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Megalodon Shark Tooth Venice, Florida, USA TIME PERIOD: Middle-Miocene to Pliocene (2.6-23 Million Years ago) Megalodon (Carcharocles megalodon), meaning "big tooth," is an extinct species of shark that lived approximately 23 to 2.6 million years ago (mya), during the Early Miocene to the end of the Pliocene. There has been some debate regarding the taxonomy of megalodon: some researchers argue that it is of the family Lamnidae, while others argue that it belongs to the family Otodontidae. Further, its genus placement is also debated, with authors placing it in either Carcharodon, Carcharias, Carcharocles, Megaselachus, Otodus, or Procarcharodon. The shark has made appearances in several works of fiction, such as the Discovery Channel's Megalodon: The Monster Shark Lives. Scientists suggest that megalodon looked like a stockier version of the great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias), though it may have looked similar to the basking shark (Cetorhinus maximus) or the sand tiger shark (Carcharias taurus). Regarded as one of the largest and most powerful fish to have ever lived, fossil remains of megalodon suggest that this giant shark reached a length of 18 meters (59 ft), though there are many other competing figures due to fragmentary remains; for example, 24 to 25 meters (79 to 82 ft). Their large jaws could exert a bite force of up to 110,000 to 180,000 newtons (25,000 to 40,000 lbf). Their teeth were thick and robust, built for grabbing prey and breaking bone. Megalodon probably had a profound impact on the structure of marine communities. The fossil record indicates that it had a cosmopolitan distribution. It probably targeted large prey, such as whales, seals, and giant turtles. Juveniles inhabited warm coastal waters where they would feed on fish and small whales. Unlike the great white which attacks prey from the soft underside, megalodon probably used its strong jaws to break through the chest cavity and puncture the heart and lungs of its prey. The animal faced competition from whale-eating cetaceans, such as Livyatan and killer whales (Orcinus orca), which likely contributed to its extinction. As it preferred warmer waters, it is thought that oceanic cooling associated with the onset of the ice ages, coupled with the lowering of sea levels and resulting loss of suitable nursing areas, may have also contributed to its decline. A reduction in the diversity of baleen whales and a shift in their distribution toward polar regions may have reduced megalodon's primary food source. The extinction of the shark appeared to affect other animals; for example, the size of baleen whales increased significantly after the shark had disappeared. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Lamniformes Family: †Otodontidae Genus: †Carcharocles Species: †C. megalodon
  21. 2 Identifications for Sharks

    I met a friend near Arcadia on Tuesday. He gave me a Sand Tiger he had just found. A couple of questions: How many different species are called Sand Tiger? How many of those existed in Florida? What is the proper scientific name for this 1.4 inch Sand Tiger? I was slightly confused and wanted to share my acquisition of this very nice tooth... I was out today and found a small shark tooth (along with lots of other stuff) that I have never found before. I use a 1/4 inch screen and this tooth dangled over the river.. I was lucky to catch it as it fell... So , which shark, which position.... Is this tooth complete???
  22. Did I find a plant fossil?

    Hi, I just thought I would ask others if this looks like a plant stalk. I thought it looked kind of like a palmetto trunk (but much smaller). Won't hurt my feelings if you think its a rock, but the repetitive pattern just made me want to ask - maybe others have seen similar specimens? It is very dense and polished from ocean/sand tumbling. (I didn't include a picture of the opposite side because it was crushed/broken and had no valuable detail) Thanks,
  23. I've written trip reports before about volunteering with the Florida Museum of Natural History (FLMNH) at their various dig sites in Florida. The currently (very) active site is called Montbrook for a small town that used to be in the area (but is no more). Here are a few links from FLMNH which provide some contextual information about the site: https://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/museum-voices/montbrook/ https://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/florida-vertebrate-fossils/sites/mont/ https://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/museum-voices/montbrook/2016/09/07/why-montbrook/ The site has yielded an impressive number of specimens and is very important scientifically as it provides the best view of Florida fauna from the late Hemphillian (Hh4) North American Land Mammal Age (NALMA) from approximately 5.5-5.0 mya. The other significant locality for this age is the Palmetto Fauna a couple hundred miles south of the Montbrook site. More info here for those interested in the stratigraphy: https://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/florida-vertebrate-fossils/land-mammal-ages/hemphillian/ https://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/florida-vertebrate-fossils/sites/palmetto-fauna/ Here is a link to my Montbrook posting from 2016 showing the couple of times I managed to get out there--the last time with TFF members Daniel @calhounensis and John-Michael @Brown Bear: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/63056-volunteer-dig-with-the-flmnh/ Now, enough of the links and time for a few pictures! The Montbrook site has changed quite a bit over the last year since I've been able to get out there. We had plans to return to Montbrook last October but Hurricane Matthew was an uninvited guest to Florida that week and the dig site was tarped down and the dig cancelled. Thankfully, the hurricane left my house untouched (didn't really even get rain or wind of note) and didn't mess-up the Montbrook site but we did miss an opportunity for one last trip to Montbrook in 2016. When we returned in February 2017 it took some time to get my bearings. The deeper pit to the east where several gomphothere skulls, tusks and long bones had been removed did not weather the rainy season well. This section has been backfilled with about 5 feet of sand and clay from the higher levels during the summer rain storms. For now they will concentrate digging on the main pit to the west and hope to get back to the lower "elephant" layer some time in the future--though the prep work to remove the overburden and get back to the original level will be significant. So much material has been moved from the upper western dig area that it was hard to picture exactly where we had dug nearly a year ago. I'm still not quite sure where we were in 2016 as the site has evolved greatly since our last visit. On Thursday and Friday there were mostly just a few volunteers who could make it to the site on weekdays--mainly retired folks or those with flexible schedules like us who could volunteer during the week. On Saturday there were a lot more volunteers and the dig site became a bit more crowded so you had to be aware of others digging sometimes in the grid square adjacent to yours. Here are some overall site photos I took on Saturday and you can see the line-up of cars that brought a full capacity of volunteers.
  24. Hey there! We live in North FL and travel to Venice several times a year to visit family. I spend a good majority of my time in Venice hanging out at the beach with my kids, hunting for teeth and other fossils. We have such a good time and I would love to find some spots where I can take them to hunt for fossils closer to home. Anybody here have any suggestions? Preferably near the big bend area. Thanks!
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