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Found 764 results

  1. Hi all, So, as some of you already know, my trip to Florida is coming closer and closer I am indeed really looking forward to it! Well, I have some questions about the fossils there. Firstly, for the seashells found there (bivalves and gastropods), I know that many are fossil (mainly Miocene to Pleistocene). Well, I was wondering if perhaps there were any tricks or techniques to recognize fossil ones from modern ones. For example, for the Holland coasts bivalves, the fossil ones are usually thicker, dull, white/light grey in color, and they don't let any (or very little) light shine through. Well, I was wondering if there were similar tricks for the Florida seashells to find out whether a shell is fossil or not. Please do let me know how you do it! Oh, and one other quick question: are ALL the shells NOT found on the beach fossils? I know that in the Netherlands this is not the case (you can find shells several kilometers inland that are modern; they have been brought here by floods and storms), but was wondering if this was maybe different for Florida. And lastly, a quick question about the fossiling permits. Do I need to sign up for one (I will be collecting both invertebrate and vertebrate fossils, like shark teeth and dugong bones)? If yes, is one permit enough for the family, or does everyone need to apply for one individually? And how do I get them? So, recap: What are tricks/techniques for recognizing fossil seashells from modern ones? Are all the inland seashells fossilized? Do I need fossil hunting permits? Also, if there are any special laws that you think I should be aware of let me know too. Thanks in advance for your answers! Best regards, Max PS: just realized, this is actually more suitable for the Fossil Hunts thread... @Fossildude19 or another moderator, can you please move it? Thanks
  2. I've been working on a job site and we dug a huge pond about 25 feet deep and these old Shell's were everywhere. I've been trying to look them up but haven't had much luck. How can I find out what types there are and possibly how old? We were working about 10 miles from the ocean so they had to have been there for meany years I would think. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.
  3. My Best Megalodon so far!

    So my daughter decided she wanted to go look for shark teeth yesterday. I went to a nearby spot that we to this point had found very little, to my surprise we found some of the best color teeth I have personally ever seen. Any suggestions on how to clean the root?
  4. I received not 1, but 3 gift boxes from our very own Nimravis. I was in Kuwait when he sent them, so I had him ship them to my parents house for safe keeping until I got home. I was VERY excited. 2 of the boxes were from Mazon Creek. My favorite is the 2 jellyfish. they are to the far right. 1 above the other. To the left of the small jellyfish is a piece of coprolite. At the bottom are unopened concretions. I have them freezing at the moment to try the freeze/thaw method to see if anything is in them. There are also ferns, a clam, and bark. The other bow was "about 22 Florida Pliocene shells from 16 different species" Thank you, Nimravis, VERY much. My son and I really appreciate this very much.
  5. Shark tooth from Florida

    Here I am with a new fossil. It's nothing special but where I live sellers usually have only shark teeth from Morocco / North Africa. I'm not an expert in the "shark teeth identification" field and I can only make hypothesis about the specie it belonged to. Suggestions? What are the diagnostic characters that can be observed in it?
  6. Carcharocles megalodon 04

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles megalodon Bone Valley, FL

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  7. Horse fossil ID

    Hey all, Any reason to believe that this horse leg might belong to anything besides Equus? It's from Ice Age Florida.
  8. Found on Fernandina Beach (FL)

    Found on Fernandina Beach in the far northeast corner of Florida. Weight 53.87 grams. Hardness somewhere between 3 and 5.5 (penny did not scratch it but steel blade does). Non magnetic. Found during incoming tide. Area is dredged frequently, also recent hurricane and several nor'easters. These are different angles of the same specimen Two more angles Not oily when cut. Does not float.
  9. Help? Shark teeth

    I’m hoping someone could help me with a quick question! I have too many teeth and I need to let some go- I know that the rules say you can’t help appraise- but perhaps offer a general idea? The teeth are small but very beautifully colored (similar to agate?). Not all of them are colorful but the ones that are seem very unique to me! I know that my idea of value is not quite right since I was raised in shark tooth city, but most of what I see for a dime a dozen is pretty plain (black/gray) and I’ve searched with not too many answers -any advice on where to get started would be great, thank you !
  10. Hi all, I wanted to start a thread for people to share their favorite fossils with amazing coloration. To kick it off here is one of my favorite shark teeth (a hemipristis from BV in Florida, miocene age). It is near max size for the species, just under 2" on the slant.
  11. Beach fossil

    I was recently looking through some fossils I found, a number of years ago, along the beach in Charlotte Co. Florida, and found an unidentified one. It is well worn from the surf but stills shows a lot of detail. Other fossils found at that time were: horse, mammoth, bison, deer, shark and a few others. This one I'm not sure of. Any help appreciated. Thanks.
  12. Hollow shark tooth?

    I found this tooth the other day and it actually took me a minute to even flip it over and realize that it was a tooth! It's almost perfectly smooth & hollow in the backside.. any explanation as to what is going on here? And yes the tooth is in rough condition. Front and back view
  13. I found this diving in the Peace River, Polk County Florida in 2013. After identification by Dr. Hulbert, he mentioned that they did not have an example of that bone in the state collection, and that they would love to have it if I ever wanted to donate it. After five years of consideration, I realized last week that it would be put to much better use there than in my living room. I mailed it last week. Glyptotherium sp. Florida Museum of Natural History (UF) tibia and fibula are fused at the proximal and distal ends (Engelmann, 1985). Bone Valley formation Peace River, Polk County, Fla river alluvial deposit on hard bottom rock.
  14. I found this yesterday, November 26, down at Venice Beach, FL near the fishing Pier, along with an assortment of shark's teeth, coral and other interesting things. It looks like a tooth to me but I didn't think it was a shark tooth. Does anyone know what it is from? Thanks in advance! I'll have to post separate posts for different angles; I guess my files are large.
  15. MEGALODON GIANT SHARK TOOTH a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Megalodon Shark Tooth Venice, Florida, USA TIME PERIOD: Middle-Miocene to Pliocene (2.6-23 Million Years ago) Megalodon (Carcharocles megalodon), meaning "big tooth," is an extinct species of shark that lived approximately 23 to 2.6 million years ago (mya), during the Early Miocene to the end of the Pliocene. There has been some debate regarding the taxonomy of megalodon: some researchers argue that it is of the family Lamnidae, while others argue that it belongs to the family Otodontidae. Further, its genus placement is also debated, with authors placing it in either Carcharodon, Carcharias, Carcharocles, Megaselachus, Otodus, or Procarcharodon. The shark has made appearances in several works of fiction, such as the Discovery Channel's Megalodon: The Monster Shark Lives. Scientists suggest that megalodon looked like a stockier version of the great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias), though it may have looked similar to the basking shark (Cetorhinus maximus) or the sand tiger shark (Carcharias taurus). Regarded as one of the largest and most powerful fish to have ever lived, fossil remains of megalodon suggest that this giant shark reached a length of 18 meters (59 ft), though there are many other competing figures due to fragmentary remains; for example, 24 to 25 meters (79 to 82 ft). Their large jaws could exert a bite force of up to 110,000 to 180,000 newtons (25,000 to 40,000 lbf). Their teeth were thick and robust, built for grabbing prey and breaking bone. Megalodon probably had a profound impact on the structure of marine communities. The fossil record indicates that it had a cosmopolitan distribution. It probably targeted large prey, such as whales, seals, and giant turtles. Juveniles inhabited warm coastal waters where they would feed on fish and small whales. Unlike the great white which attacks prey from the soft underside, megalodon probably used its strong jaws to break through the chest cavity and puncture the heart and lungs of its prey. The animal faced competition from whale-eating cetaceans, such as Livyatan and killer whales (Orcinus orca), which likely contributed to its extinction. As it preferred warmer waters, it is thought that oceanic cooling associated with the onset of the ice ages, coupled with the lowering of sea levels and resulting loss of suitable nursing areas, may have also contributed to its decline. A reduction in the diversity of baleen whales and a shift in their distribution toward polar regions may have reduced megalodon's primary food source. The extinction of the shark appeared to affect other animals; for example, the size of baleen whales increased significantly after the shark had disappeared. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Lamniformes Family: †Otodontidae Genus: †Carcharocles Species: †C. megalodon
  16. MEGALODON GIANT SHARK TOOTH a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Megalodon Shark Tooth Venice, Florida, USA TIME PERIOD: Middle-Miocene to Pliocene (2.6-23 Million Years ago) Megalodon (Carcharocles megalodon), meaning "big tooth," is an extinct species of shark that lived approximately 23 to 2.6 million years ago (mya), during the Early Miocene to the end of the Pliocene. There has been some debate regarding the taxonomy of megalodon: some researchers argue that it is of the family Lamnidae, while others argue that it belongs to the family Otodontidae. Further, its genus placement is also debated, with authors placing it in either Carcharodon, Carcharias, Carcharocles, Megaselachus, Otodus, or Procarcharodon. The shark has made appearances in several works of fiction, such as the Discovery Channel's Megalodon: The Monster Shark Lives. Scientists suggest that megalodon looked like a stockier version of the great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias), though it may have looked similar to the basking shark (Cetorhinus maximus) or the sand tiger shark (Carcharias taurus). Regarded as one of the largest and most powerful fish to have ever lived, fossil remains of megalodon suggest that this giant shark reached a length of 18 meters (59 ft), though there are many other competing figures due to fragmentary remains; for example, 24 to 25 meters (79 to 82 ft). Their large jaws could exert a bite force of up to 110,000 to 180,000 newtons (25,000 to 40,000 lbf). Their teeth were thick and robust, built for grabbing prey and breaking bone. Megalodon probably had a profound impact on the structure of marine communities. The fossil record indicates that it had a cosmopolitan distribution. It probably targeted large prey, such as whales, seals, and giant turtles. Juveniles inhabited warm coastal waters where they would feed on fish and small whales. Unlike the great white which attacks prey from the soft underside, megalodon probably used its strong jaws to break through the chest cavity and puncture the heart and lungs of its prey. The animal faced competition from whale-eating cetaceans, such as Livyatan and killer whales (Orcinus orca), which likely contributed to its extinction. As it preferred warmer waters, it is thought that oceanic cooling associated with the onset of the ice ages, coupled with the lowering of sea levels and resulting loss of suitable nursing areas, may have also contributed to its decline. A reduction in the diversity of baleen whales and a shift in their distribution toward polar regions may have reduced megalodon's primary food source. The extinction of the shark appeared to affect other animals; for example, the size of baleen whales increased significantly after the shark had disappeared. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Lamniformes Family: †Otodontidae Genus: †Carcharocles Species: †C. megalodon
  17. MEGALODON GIANT SHARK TOOTH a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Megalodon Shark Tooth Venice, Florida, USA TIME PERIOD: Middle-Miocene to Pliocene (2.6-23 Million Years ago) Megalodon (Carcharocles megalodon), meaning "big tooth," is an extinct species of shark that lived approximately 23 to 2.6 million years ago (mya), during the Early Miocene to the end of the Pliocene. There has been some debate regarding the taxonomy of megalodon: some researchers argue that it is of the family Lamnidae, while others argue that it belongs to the family Otodontidae. Further, its genus placement is also debated, with authors placing it in either Carcharodon, Carcharias, Carcharocles, Megaselachus, Otodus, or Procarcharodon. The shark has made appearances in several works of fiction, such as the Discovery Channel's Megalodon: The Monster Shark Lives. Scientists suggest that megalodon looked like a stockier version of the great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias), though it may have looked similar to the basking shark (Cetorhinus maximus) or the sand tiger shark (Carcharias taurus). Regarded as one of the largest and most powerful fish to have ever lived, fossil remains of megalodon suggest that this giant shark reached a length of 18 meters (59 ft), though there are many other competing figures due to fragmentary remains; for example, 24 to 25 meters (79 to 82 ft). Their large jaws could exert a bite force of up to 110,000 to 180,000 newtons (25,000 to 40,000 lbf). Their teeth were thick and robust, built for grabbing prey and breaking bone. Megalodon probably had a profound impact on the structure of marine communities. The fossil record indicates that it had a cosmopolitan distribution. It probably targeted large prey, such as whales, seals, and giant turtles. Juveniles inhabited warm coastal waters where they would feed on fish and small whales. Unlike the great white which attacks prey from the soft underside, megalodon probably used its strong jaws to break through the chest cavity and puncture the heart and lungs of its prey. The animal faced competition from whale-eating cetaceans, such as Livyatan and killer whales (Orcinus orca), which likely contributed to its extinction. As it preferred warmer waters, it is thought that oceanic cooling associated with the onset of the ice ages, coupled with the lowering of sea levels and resulting loss of suitable nursing areas, may have also contributed to its decline. A reduction in the diversity of baleen whales and a shift in their distribution toward polar regions may have reduced megalodon's primary food source. The extinction of the shark appeared to affect other animals; for example, the size of baleen whales increased significantly after the shark had disappeared. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Lamniformes Family: †Otodontidae Genus: †Carcharocles Species: †C. megalodon
  18. Turkey day Meg

    Went for an hour hunt after dinner tonight and glad I did. We had some rain today and hit a site that most stuff is broken at now but somehow this guy made it thru.
  19. Conodont?

  20. Vexillum barnardense

    Reference Gardner, Julia A. 1937. "The Molluscan Fauna of the Alum Bluff Group of Florida. Part VI - Pteropoda, Opisthobranchia, and Ctenobranchia (In Part)," U. S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 142-F.
  21. Vexillum cnestum

    Reference Gardner, Julia A. 1937. "The Molluscan Fauna of the Alum Bluff Group of Florida. Part VI - Pteropoda, Opisthobranchia, and Ctenobranchia (In Part)," U. S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 142-F.
  22. Olivella oryzoides

    Reference Gardner, Julia A. 1937. "The Molluscan Fauna of the Alum Bluff Group of Florida. Part VI - Pteropoda, Opisthobranchia, and Ctenobranchia (In Part)," U. S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 142-F.
  23. Olivella cotinados

    Reference Gardner, Julia A. 1937. "The Molluscan Fauna of the Alum Bluff Group of Florida. Part VI - Pteropoda, Opisthobranchia, and Ctenobranchia (In Part)," U. S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 142-F.
  24. Nassarius oxia

    Screen washed collection of bulk sediment.
  25. Nassarius anisonema

    Screen washed collection of block sediment
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