Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'foraminifera'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 56 results

  1. Foray into Foraminifera

    Good morning all!- hope you are all healthy! I found these foraminifera (my first!!!) on April 20, but took my time fishing them out of some limestone, then meticulously cleaning and prepping them. Thanks to Clear Lake for suggesting, in my first post that it looks similar to Ozawainella ciscoensis-really appreciate it! They were all found in winterset limestone in Kansas City. Researching numerous references, I found it is far more complicated identifying them, so I'll send them to someone with more expertise in i.d.s! , and am leaving them as simply Foraminifera. I i.d. them under a dissecting scope, then used 30 gauge needles to loosen them with applications of vinegar, then washed them in alternating vinegar and water, then placed them on blue clay to make them stick in place. The best one has 4 views. Just received my digital microscope and love it!! So simple and easy to use! My previous post stated it measured 458um or so, but I used the wrong objective- all of these are 860-900um in diameter. I went ahead and placed them on the fossil of the month, only because I haven't seen a lot of images on them in the forum (though I'm still looking through ).Thoughts and suggestions appreciated, and thanks for making me feel like a kid again! Hope you enjoy!- The beauty of some things simply cannot be appreciated unless you look closely!!!! Bone
  2. Is this Foraminifera?

    Good morning all! While I was magnifying a shell which looks similar to a modern scallop I noted several discoid shaped objects in the matrix, so I cleaned them away and these are the best pictures I have so far. It measures 458um in diameter and is heavily crystallized. It is a very fossiliferous Pennsylvanian layer is all I can i.d. On the right track or way off? I have both sides depicted but the edge also has small "pores"/discreet nodules but can't get a pick of that yet. I will try to get some better pictures too. Thanks for looking and comments appreciated! Bone
  3. The Jurassic of Europe

    PDF BIOSTRATIGRAPHIE DU JURASSIQUE OUEST-EUROPÉEN ET MÉDITERRANÉEN Zonations parallèles et distribution des invertébrés et microfossiles Elie CARIOU & Pierre HANTZPERGUE memoire 17 Elf exploration & Production @Coco @michele 1937 @fifbrindacier typologie:ouvrage synthetique,et:utile,probablement edit: pour probablement,lire: peut etre Useful stratigraphic information in this one edit 2: ca. 31 MB,alors:large
  4. Textularia? or what?

    This sample was stained by rose bengal solution. it was sampled from the intertidal zone in Apo reef natural park in mindoro, Philippines, around >5m depth. I'm confused on what species is this. I have no other pictures since we are under a community quarantine here in Manila so I have no access with my microscope.
  5. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. Attached is what I've got so far, but I can clearly use help with corals, mollusks, plants, vertebrates, ichnofossils, and the post-Paleozoic In the attached file, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to commonly observe the item of interest; paler orange indicates times in earth history to less commonly observe the item of interest. White indicates very little to no practical probability of observing the item of interest. Please keep in mind that the listed indicators are things like “conspicuous horn corals,” purposefully declining to address rare encounters with groups of low preservation potential, low recognizability, etc. Got additions/amendments, especially for the groups mentioned above? Toss them in the comments below! Thank you..... https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1tVm_u6v573V4NACrdebb_1OsBEAz60dS1m4pCTckgyA
  6. Scientists use ancient marine fossils to unravel longstanding climate puzzle by Cardiff University https://phys.org/news/2020-01-scientists-ancient-marine-fossils-unravel.html Ancient marine fossils reveal how rising sea levels trapped carbon in the oceans preventing extinction-level global warming 14 million years ago. Fossil records suggest high levels of carbon was captured in ocean sediment. Significant volcanic activity had previously led to extinction level events. RyanMorrison, Daily Mail, January 9, 2020 https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-7869605/Ancient-marine-fossils-used-study-previous-global-warming-events.html The Open Access paper is: Sosdian, S., Babila, T.L., Greenop, R., Foster, G.L. and Lear, C., 2019. Ocean Carbon Storage across the middle Miocene: A new interpretation for the Monterey Event. Nature Communications. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-13792-0 Yours, Paul H.
  7. The Dinosaur-Killing Asteroid Acidified the Ocean in a Flash The Chicxulub event was as damaging to life in the oceans as it was to creatures on land, a study shows. New York Times https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/21/science/chicxulub-asteroid-ocean-acid.html Tiny shell fossils reveal how ocean acidification can cause mass extinction By Julie Zaugg, CNN, October 22, 2019 https://www.cnn.com/2019/10/22/europe/ocean-acidification-asteroid-intl-hnk-scn/index.html New study underpins the idea of a sudden impact killing off dinosaurs and much of the other life, GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre October 22, 2019 https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191022080721.htm The open access paper is: Michael J. Henehan, Andy Ridgwell, Ellen Thomas, Shuang Zhang, Laia Alegret, Daniela N. Schmidt, James W. B. Rae, James D. Witts, Neil H. Landman, Sarah E. Greene, Brian T. Huber, James R. Super, Noah J. Planavsky, Pincelli M. Hull, 2019, Rapid ocean acidification and protracted Earth system recovery followed the end-Cretaceous Chicxulub impact. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Oct 2019, 201905989; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1905989116 https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2019/10/15/1905989116 Yours, Paul H.
  8. I really like the shape to these. I have come across sites with photos of these but I can't seem to find any info about them such as what period they may be from. These microfossils are harder to research than they are to find...phewww.
  9. To Rumi: Thanks for the ID of the elphidium ...The specimen in the last post was the largest I came across, it was about 1.5mm, all the rest are well less than 1mm. Are these smaller ones in this post of the same species? Thanks....
  10. Benthic Foram ID

    Hi Everyone, While this is not a fossil, it is a very large benthic foram that I am having trouble idenifying. Could anyone either tell me what this is, or point me to somewhere or someone that could help? This specimen is not whole, there is an outer ring on the other specimens like this, that is a slightly different pattern to the one seen here. These are up to 2 or 3 mm across. I have found them in VERY high abundances and need to figure out what they are. Thanks!
  11. Hi everyone I think I just found a new hobby With my latest fossil delivery I recieved quite a lot of microfossils & matrix vials as the world of microfossils was something that I have been long interested in. So a 2 weeks ago I finally ordered my first microfossils for which I reserved a special drawer in my archive cabinet. So here is a recapp of what I all got: 3 vials of permian material from Waurika, Oklahoma 1 vial of permian material from The red beds of Archer County, Texas 1 small vial of Conodont rich Mississippian material from the Chappel Limestone formation, Texas 1 small vial of Cretaceous Lower Gault Clay, East Wear bay, Folkestone, Kent, UK A micropalaeontology slide with Jurassic Blue Lias matrix rich in holothurian material. A thin section of an Ostracods filled Elimia snail from the Green River Formation in Wyoming A thin section from the Rhynie chert of Scotland which should contain preserved parts of the plant Aglaophyton major and perhaps even other species. I also got a lot of Bull Canyon micro fossil teeth and 2 cretaceous mammal teeth from Hell Creek In this topic you will be able to follow my path through this newly discovered hobby as I will post my finds and progress Currently I am only working with a clip-on cellphone microscope, but I do plan on getting a professional microscope in the next few months! (Tips are always welcome) So let's put on our Ant-Man suit and explore the microfossil realm So here are some of the first pictures I made of some of the microfossils Starting with the thin slices! Thin slice with Ostracon filled Elimia tenara snail from the Green River Formation, Wyoming Thin slice with Aglaophyton major from Rhynie Chert in Scotland
  12. I'm heading down to Newport Beach, CA- south of LA. Does anyone know of micro-sites there with access? I'm also looking for information on local stratigraphy there. Any on-line resources that you could recommend? I'm new to collecting- and have been learning a lot from reading previous related posts. Your suggestions and advice are welcome.
  13. Larger Benthic Foraminifera

    What is the identification of the foraminifera present in this section? We suspect it as assilina but we think this should have a younger age instead. Thank you!
  14. Montana, a shortish faunal review

    EASTON W.H.Easton: Carboniferous Faunas and Formation of Central Montana A study of the stratigraphic and ecologic associations and significance of fossils from the Big Snowy group of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks Geological suvey Proferssional paper n.348/1962 Number of pages 157 PLATE two: stratidistribplate-2.pdf PLATE ONE(correlation/logs) plate-1.pdf to be used with some care with regard to (at least)the taxonomic aspects
  15. Foraminifera for Christmas

    The Nerdiest Christmas Cards Ever May Be These Microscope Slides Composed of Shells The unusual holiday exchange, which lasted decades during the early 20th-century, hints at the drama between the two colleagues Smithsonian By Allison C. Meier, December 17, 2018 https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/two-scientists-exchanged-christmas-greetings-microscope-slides-180971049/ A century ago, two scientists exchanged fantastic microscope slides as Christmas cards https://boingboing.net/2018/12/17/a-century-ago-two-scientists.html Yours, Paul H.
  16. Hi guys! This is a continuation of a previous post focusing just on the sponges. These fossils are from the Capitan Formation, which is Permian Period, Guadalupian Epoch, Capitanian Stage. Because these fossils are in the park, no collecting was allowed, and I can't provide additional images. Any confirmations about the identification or suggestions about a more specific identification are welcome. This trilobite is the only fossil out of these images that was actually found in Carlsbad Caverns, right behind the elevator. Can I get more specific on an ID? Cross section of rugose coral? Sponge? Bryozoan. Acanthocladia? Bryozoan? Crinoid.
  17. Hi guys! I don't post here often, but I'm a PhD student in geology, currently working on tropical Paleogene palynology. I'm taking an unrelated class on the Permian Basin and I am working on identifying some of the fossils our class saw in Guadalupe Mountains National Park. I'm not a sponge expert, and I was hoping someone on the forum might be able to confirm or correct my identifications. I might make a follow-up post on the non-sponge fossils we saw on the trip. A bit of background, these pictures were taken in the field with a metric scale, the scale has been cropped out of the pictures and a 5 mm scale bar is added. No fossil collecting was allowed on this trip so I won't be able to provide additional images. The fossils are from the Capitan Formation, which is Permian Period, Guadalupian Epoch, Capitanian Stage. The global stage name is actually named after the nearby El Capitan peak. Amblysiphonella? Archaeolithoporella?
  18. Retracing Antarctica’s Glacial Past LSU geologist uncovers new data to inform future sea level rise https://www.lsu.edu/mediacenter/news/2018/09/25gg_bart_scireports.php https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/09/180925140417.htm https://phys.org/news/2018-09-retracing-antarctica-glacial.html The open-access paper is: Bart, P.J., DeCesare, M., Rosenheim, B.E., Majewski, W. and McGlannan, A., 2018. A centuries-long delay between a paleo-ice-shelf collapse and grounding- line retreat in the Whales Deep Basin, eastern Ross Sea, Antarctica. Scientific reports, 8(1), article 12392. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-29911-8 Yours, Paul H.
  19. Living sands

    langerjeukarcyclebeachfaciesCarbonate Production ms 2008.pdf J.Eukar.Microbiol.v55/3-2008 M.Langer: Asessing the Contribution of foraminiferan protists to global ocean carbonate production "With an estimated production of at least 130 million tons of CaCO3 per year, they contribute almost 5% of the annual present-day carbonate production in the world’s reef and shelf areas (0–200 m) and approximately 2.5% of the CaCO3 of all oceans." Nice figures:1-8 Important figure: 9,12
  20. What is this seed looking fossil?

    Can you help me identify this fossil? Late Miocene/Miocene, Phillipines, Camarines Norte
  21. Id Cretaceous Foraminifera

    Hi everyone, does anyone know these foraminifera? Age: Aptian-lower Santonian. Environment: carbonate platform.
  22. As some of you may know, I am building a foraminifera catalog of all times. So Iam happy about contributions by professional and avocational scientists: Dr. M.Dan Georgescu, Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary, AB, Canada is making a great contribution of SEM images of foraminifera from his publications on foram lineages in the fossil record. Check it out at www.foraminifera.eu/collection.php…
  23. I was out hunting near Spring Valley, Minnesota with @Bev and @minnbuckeye the last couple of days. As always, I was looking for coprolites. Mike came across this first piece, sitting loose in a piece of weathered matrix. While we were splitting rocks, we found a virgin layer of the source matrix. When we got back to Bev's fossil barn (everyone should have one), I took a peak under the microscope at two of the loose, irregular objects but couldn't really see much because of the powdery iron oxide coating. When I lightly rinsed them, they revealed these microscopic (calcareous) jack-shaped objects. Similar inclusions were in both objects loose objects. You can see from the broken spine on the inclusion in the lower right that they are hollow. In the other loose piece and those still embedded in the matrix, I can also see random straw-like spines of the same material. I'm not sure if these are coprolites, algal masses or something else. I have seen coprolites covered in powdery iron oxide before. Eventually I would like to free more of these from the matrix so that I can sacrifice one to get a look at the interior. Can anyone identify the little jack-shaped inclusions? The spines may have been quite a bit longer. The only things I can think of are forams or perhaps diatoms. Bev and Mike - What was the name of that cliff again? Decorah Shale? @Carl
  24. Hi everyone, does anyone know this Foraminifera from carbonate platform? They look like Miliolidae
×