Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'formations'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 20 results

  1. I use this site https://mrdata.usgs.gov/geology/state/map-us.html#search-results to see what formations my collecting sites are in. But, due to my lack of knowledge (?) it only helps so much. When I click on the map at the collection site location I get this type of data : Record ID Name Comment OHOdl;0 Drakes, Whitewater and Liberty Formations, Undivided Ordovician OHOgm;0 Grant Lake and Fairview Formations, Miamitown Shale, Undivided Ordovician OHOwa;0 Waynesville and Arnheim Formations, Undivided Ordovician I interpret this to mean that all 3 formations are represented at this site. In this case, standing at the site I can visibly discern 2 very different areas, one above the other. But that isn't typically the case. Can anyone give me some guidance or point me in the direction of how to interpret this information? Is there a better place to go to figure out the formations?
  2. Hello all! This is a little photo project I've been working on for a while. When I first started Fossil Hunting I was content to collect whatever. Then I was excited about Identifying what I was finding. The education continued and now I work to identify the geological formations I am collecting in and am able to know what fossils to look for in what areas. The Pocket Texas Geology website is invaluable for finding out the formation of a specific area (while not 100 percent accurate, it's pretty good). So I wanted to create a post that would help with Central Texas Cretaceous Fossil Identification and this Species by Formation post. There are a couple of great websites for North Texas Fossil ID, but none (that I am aware of) for specifically Central Texas. I am considering Central Texas to be the counties of Hays, Travis, Comal, Blanco, Bexar, Kendell, Williamson, Hill, Burnet, Llano, Bell, Coryell, McLennon and Bosque. And bear in mind, this is not a comprehensive list of all species found in these formations...still working on THAT! But this is what I have found and ID'd so far. I believe it contains MOST of the more commonly found fossils, plus some uncommon fossils. If you see a mis-identification, please let me know! Also, there are more formations than I am presenting, but these have been the most accessible to me. I will list them by ascending order of time period. My time periods are approximate. (Be aware, I am not a geologist nor paleontologist, just an avid amateur, so take it for what it's worth! ) Cretaceous Formations: Glen Rose, Walnut, Comanche Peak, Edwards , Georgetown, Buda, and Austin Chalk. Glen Rose Formation 106-110 MYA (Upper and Lower Glen Rose combined here) ECHINOIDS Row 1. Row 2. Row 3. Row 4. Row 5. Row 6. 1. Hyposalenia phillipsae Echinothurid plates Plagiochasma texanum 2, Goniopygus sp. Pygopyrina hancockensis Paraorthopsis comalensis 3. Loriolia rosana Goniopygus whitneyi Pseudodiadema aguilerai 4. Polydiadema travisensis Leptosalenia texana Hetearaster texanus 5. Coenholectypus sp. Pliotoxaster comanchei Phymosoma texana 6. Cidarid sp. Heteraster obliquetus Paracidarid texanus ECHINODERMATA ETC. 1. 2. 1. Unknown Crinoid Isocrinus annulatus Echinoderm Madreporite 2. Balanocidarid Spine Echinoid Spine Balanocidarid Spine AMMONITES 1. . Engonoceras piedernales Hypacanthoplites mayfieldensis DECAPODS 1. 2. 1. Crab Claw Unknown Crab Claw Unknown Pagurus banderiensis 2. Pagurus banderiensis Pagurus banderiensis Pagurus banderiensis ETCETERA 1. 2. 3. 1. Porocystis globularis Fish Pycnodont Teeth Turtle Bone Fragment 2. Foramnifera Orbitolina (group) Foramnifera Orbitolina (single) Coral Heliopora labyrinthicum 3. Spirobus Worm Annelid Worm GASTROPODS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5, 6. 7. 1. Neritina sp Semineritina apparata Pleutomaria glenrosensis 2. Natica texana Nerinia texana Nerinia harrisi 3. Fusus haysensis Turbo cuyleri Anchura monolifera 4. Cerithium blancoesnsis Unknown Gastropod Unknown Gastropod 5. Nerinia incisa Pseudomelania pupoides Tylostoma traviensis 6. Natica traski Cerithium bullardi Nerinia aquilina 7.. Tylostoma turmidum Purpuroides harperi Lunatia praegrandis BIVALVES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9 10. Other Bivalves : 11. 12. 13 . BIVALVES 1. Lima wacoensis Arca texana Ludbrookia arivechensis 2. Trigonia whitneyi Exogyra paupercula Plicatula parkerae 3. Brachidontes pedernalis Chlamys santoni Granocardium pseudopendens 4. Neithia occidentalis Cardium congestum Arctica comalensis 5. Pinna comancheana Granicardium pendens Fimbria hamiltonae 6. Trigonia gordoni Homomya comalensis Laternula simodsi 7. Psilomya walker Trigonia wendleri Homomya knowltoni 8. Tapes decepta Panopea henselli Arctica texana 9. Psilomya banderiensis Protocardia texana Arca medialis 10. Cyprimeria texana Idonearca terminalis Arctica roemeri 11. Lopha comalensis Ceratosterean texanum Exogyra guadalupae 12. Peilinia crenulimargo Liostrea ragsdalei 13. RUDISTS: Monopleura sp. Toucasia sp. Kimbleia capacis
  3. I have a few things I want to know about the fossil formations in general. Are there any formations located underground entirely and are undiscovered? Have we seen more evolved species disposited on top of another less evolved species? Thanks for any help
  4. Need Help with Identification

    Hi everyone, need help with some identification here. The first photos of the brown looking tooth was found in Edisto, while the bone you see was found in Dorchester Creek in Summerville.
  5. My Tyrannosaur research

    Hi I decided to make a post about my main research project right now on Campanian Tyrannosaurs specifically Daspletosaurus. Today I have found something to tell teeth from the Judith River Formation and Dinosaur Park Formation. This could also do with the Tyrannosaurs prey or locality. I found out that Judith River Formation Tyrannosaur teeth serrations are more circular and more round compared to the same time Dinosaur Park Formation Tyrannosaur teeth serrations. The Dinosaur Park Formation Tyrannosaur teeth serrations are more longer skinner and more chiseled like but not like other Tyrannosaur teeth from other areas like T. rex’s teeth serrations. Certain Tyrannosaurs in different areas and times would/could of had unique serration morphology probably dew to there prey. I did this on multiple teeth from the Judith River Formation and Dinosaur Park Formation to strengthen my hypothesis. Any opinions on this topic would be great. I will post more on my research here on this and other topics on the Tyrannosaur/Daspletosaurus. I have been doing research on this Daspletosaurus from the Dinosaur Park Formation and it’s close relatives because it was the first dinosaur fossil I’ve ever found. I’ve liked fossils and dinosaurs since I was 2 but in 2018 I went to Alberta and found my first dinosaur fossil which was a fossil from the Dinosaur Park Formation Daspletosaurus sp. Thats why I have been researching on this topic. The serrations I found on Dinosaur Park Formation Tyrannosaur teeth. The serrations I found on Judith River Formation Tyrannosaur teeth.
  6. Well, in my research to find a fossiliferous bed near me I have been struggling with the geology, and spending days driving around observing, taking notes and pics. Well, I just found a published paper from one of the original paleontologists. In it, he lists the location of each outcrop, but this leads to more confusion. When I track the T,R,S locations listed, there is nothing there. Every promising site I found while scouting is clearly visible on satellite mapping. When I look up the listed spots, I find NOTHING. It's just plowed farmland. I find zero evidence of buttes, mesas, draws, cuts or anything that could be an exposure of the formation. I've obviously got to do some more "boots on the ground" stuff, but I'm not feeling hopeful for the listed sites. Maybe I'll start by investigating any outcrops closest to the listed locations.
  7. Where to go in New Mexico

    Greetings!!! I'm planning a trip to New Mexico this summer. I would welcome any information besides the basic tourist stuff. I'll be in the northern Farmington area for a week. Can't wait!!! Thanks in advance for any insight. Bruce (WATERLINE)
  8. Hi I decided to make this since the new Tyrannosaur from Alberta’s Foremost Formation, Thanatotheristes deerootorum has just been named and described. Enjoy!! Tyrannosaur bearing Formations in Canada: Formations in Alberta but most of the Formations on my list are I Alberta anyway. Horseshoe Canyon Formation 74-68 million years ago, Alberta: Albertosaurus sarcophagus, possibly Daspletosaurus sp. but no compelling evidence so far. Oldman Formation 78.2-77 million years ago, Alberta: Daspletosaurus torosus, Gorgosaurus sp. Foremost Formation 80.5-78.2 million years ago, Alberta: Thanatotheristes deerootorum, possibly Gorgosaurus sp. Milk River Formation 84.5-83.4 million years ago, Alberta: Tyrannosaur. indet could be a species of Thanatotheristes, possibly Gorgosaurus sp. Scollard Formation 68-66 million years ago, Alberta: T. rex, possibly Nanotyrannus Formations in British Columbia: Wapiti Formation 76.8-70 million years ago, Alberta, British Columbia: Unknown Albertosaurinae either Gorgosaurus or Albertosaurus, possibly Daspletosaurus sp. Tumbler Ridge 135-74 million years ago, British Columbia: Tyrannosaur. indet Formations in Saskatchewan and Manitoba: Dinosaur Park Formation 77-75.5 million years ago, Alberta, Saskatchewan: Daspletosaurus sp., Gorgosaurus libratus Frenchmen Formation, 68-66 million years ago, Saskatchewan: T. rex, possibly Nanotyrannus Bearpaw Formation 75-72 million years ago, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba: Daspletosaurus sp. one specimen from Daspletosaurus sp. that drowned. For now these are all the Tyrannosaurs known from Canada. No Eastern Tyrannosaurs in Canada yet either but maybe someday. I will also update this and add as more information comes available.
  9. Strange Formation On Road Cut

    This on a high wall on a road cut along side of the end of rt 34 in Hamlin Lincoln CO WV, its about 20 ft above the road about 625ft above see level and about 60ft above the mud river am i correct in assuming that this hole was caused by a torrent of water whipping that boulder around inside there its about the size of a medicine ball. Ive seen these on the bottoms of creeks but never up on hillside like that. What kind of flow would it take to do this as far as feet per second i know theres a formula just cant think of it
  10. I believe these are sandstone formations? but not sure of type fresh of the ground last night.
  11. As you all are (hopefully) aware at this point, there are countless scores of fossiliferous formations all across the world, each with its own name. What formation's name do you like the most? I'd have to go with my home town Conasauga Formation. It has a really nice ring to it (and of course, there's some home-town bias in there ).
  12. Placement of terrestrial formations in the late cretaceous of North America as been constantly evolving and in October 2016 Denver Fowler a Paleontologist at the Museum of the Rockies published a very extensive paper on the subject and updated most units. This is very important when it comes to understanding dinosaur evolution and aids in describing species. This paper is in the process of going through peer review so is subject to change. Fowler DW. (2016) A new correlation of the Cretaceous formations of the Western Interior of the United States, I: Santonian-Maastrichtian formations and dinosaur biostratigraphy. PeerJ Preprints 4:e2554v1https://doi.org/10.7287/peerj.preprints.2554v1 The paper is pretty technical but all of the data is found in this excel file (supplemental information) which is a massive high-resolution stratigraphic chart for all of the formations from the late cretaceous of North America. It's nice to see it all laid out and a great reference source. https://doi.org/10.7287/peerj.preprints.2554v1/supp-1 To make it easy I've broken the chart apart so you can easily see most important dinosaur formations Texas The biggest change came with our understanding the Aguja and Javelina Formations of Texas part of the Tornillo group. The study indicated that the Aguja Formation deposits are only Campanian in age and that the Javelina Formation does not extend into the end of the Cretaceous. Very important when trying to describe species in those formations. Sellers have been comparing the Aguja to the Judith River in Montana well there is a correlation but its deposits are much younger that JR. Eastern Montana, N. Dakota, S. Dakota and Wyoming What I found interesting is that the Hell Creek is much older in Montana than in the adjacent states. The other interesting observation that can been easily be seen on these charts is that the how short a time frame the deposits of the Hell Creek/Lance formation are compared to the other major dinosaur formations. Central Montana Two Medicine and Judith River Formations are the two key formations in this locality Utah and New Mexico Utah depicted on the left and NM on the right Head North to Canada Alberta and Saskatchewan
  13. Ok This wall had me looking at it for some time, do you see anything fossil related? location 2km north of amathus ancient city, limassol, island of cyprus and on the opposite hill :
  14. Looking for information about Hengshan, Hunan.

    I have a friend that lives in a remote area of China in the Hunan province. I was just wondering if anyone has information on fossils near Hengshan, Hunan? Outcrops, localities, what to look for? I know it's a shot in the dark, but worth a try.
  15. Galena/Platteville

    Willmann et al: https://archive.org/details/plattevillegalen502will About 4 Mb
  16. Hello I'm heading to Kansas for a father son weekend at his campus. (Jayhawks) Lawrence Kansas. i was curious if anyone has any areas of interest for trilobites? I'm doing some research but not much luck so I'm hoping someone here knows if some areas? We are going to hunt lake texoma on our way back and maybe NSR.. But if we can find some areas near 35 on our way back it would be great.. thanks everyone..
  17. I stumbled on this tonight and it's got some great info! http://carolinageologicalsociety.org/CGS/1950s_files/gb%201957.pdf
  18. While researching formations in my area, I stumbled on this report. I found it really interesting as, if I'm looking at the maps and graphs correctly, shows the depths of the various formations along with their geological periods... http://www.dnr.sc.gov/water/hydro/HydroPubs/pdf/SCWRC_139.pdf
  19. Olmsted County, Minnesota

    I stumbled upon this while researching Brachiopods and thought it deserved a mention. It's a chart with the stratigraphy of Olmsted County, Minnesota but applies to most of Southeast Minnesota. There's also a nice chart showing the geological time scale of Minnesota. Charts from "Environmental Geology of Olmsted County, Minnesota" R. K. Hogberg, 1973 Generalized Geologic Secton Geologic Time Chart
  20. 2 More Discoveries Today

    I found 2 more discoveries today on a couple of odd rocks and have no clue as to what they maybe
×