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Found 113 results

  1. Hey folks! I had posted in the Fossil ID section regarding a little boi I had found some time ago, and a few of you guys really gave me the urge and confidence to go try my hand at some first time collecting of my own! I read a few guides on this site, did some research, and intrepidly went wandering around a large public forest here in Ottawa; I had read some very old reports that there were some old exposed fossil rocks to be found there. After a lot of confused wandering, and almost calling it quits as I was losing the light (and hope), I did eventually come across a very large rock poking out of the forest floor which was studded with spiral shelled fossils which were almost fist sized! The host rock was far too large for me to just drag out of the forest and I didn't manage to get any pictures as it was getting dark and spooky out, but I noted the spot and returned home. My question is what do you guys think about the best practice for something like that would be? Leave it in-situ for future explorers to go see or have at a few sections of it with a hammer and chisel? I would love to take a few samples home and try my hand at preservation and presentation techniques, but I'm not sure whether removing parts of something like that would be considered poor form and my inner archaeologist cringes at the thought of removing items from their original context. The rock in question was quite a ways off the beaten path however, and I doubt anyone would stumble across it out of sheer coincidence so I was thinking maybe chipping away at a few wouldn't be too damaging, but I would really like your much more informed opinions. If the type of fossil/rock makes a difference in the final considerations I can go snap a picture or two the next time I have some free time! (apologies if any of my terminology is erroneous or nonsensical, theres so much to learn!)
  2. Hey im new to this site so im not sure on how anything works and if im doing anything correct but anyway i am going on a fossil hunting trip to the uk next year for about 1 week but i have no clue where to go. This is my first ever time going on a trip just for fossils so idont know what to do and where to go so yeh i need a bit of help. Thanks
  3. Hey y'all! I've been wanting to go hunting for dinosaur material for a long time now - problem is I'm in eastern Texas (I also can't travel too far). Most of the stuff around here is marine. I've been doing some research, and I've found the Antlers Formation in southern Oklahoma which has deinonychus and tenontosaurus, among others. Where would be the best place to actually go hunt? Do I need to go on private property, by the side of a river, or what? It'd be great if anyone has gone hunting in that formation, I'd love to hear your tips! My primary goal would be to find deinonychus teeth. The first deinonychus in the antlers formation was found on the grounds of the Howard McLeod Correctional Center in the late 90's. I'd think around that area would be a good place to start. This is the bulletin (from the Oklahoma geological survey) I found that reports the finding of deinonychus antirrhopus in the antlers formation: http://www.ogs.ou.edu/pubsscanned/BULLETINS/Bulletin146.pdf Address of Howard McLeod Correctional Center: 19603 E. Whippoorwill Lane, Atoka, OK 74525 Any other general fossil hunting tips would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
  4. Hi Everyone, this is my first post and I like to thank you for your information. I will be traveling to the US in October. I'm going to travel in my car from Los Angeles, las vegas, Flagstaff, Albuquerque, Amarillo, Oklahoma, Memphis, New Orleans, Panama City, Sarasota, and Orlando. I want to take advantage of that to do little fossil huntings across that sites. Obviously, I don't want to do something illegal or wrong while collecting. I was talking with some guy from natural science and tell me which is legal and which not. The original idea is to fossil collect near the road. Do you know where to find good fossils like ammonites, corals, shells, echinoderms, etc near roads? This will be my route. I'm not professional or the next Alan Grant or Charig. I only want one specimen or two from every place if possible. Thanks to everyone, sorry for my English. If you tell me where to stop near the road or taking a detour for a mile will be alright. I have already some point marked but you're the bosses, boys and Girls!!!
  5. Fossil Hunting in Japan

    Hello all, I've noticed that on occasion people stop by and ask about fossil hunting in Japan. Although I don't have much around me, this map is a fantastic way to see the general age of the rocks around/ near you. I think it's a great resource so please check it out.. Plus it's really interesting in general. https://gbank.gsj.jp/geonavi/geonavi.php#12,34.98798,136.93432 If you turn on the "seamless legend" option you can find on the top left of the map border, it will show you the age and type of rock that you have clicked on. I hope it helps some people. (Sorry if this is in the wrong place, please inform me if there is an issue admin)
  6. I am rather new to this, but for now rather than explain I actually had more questions, and wanted to share general info about NSR today. My neighbor and I ventured down from Oklahoma to NSR today to take advantage of the cool temps and recent rain. It wasnt enough rain to do much for NSR, but we found a few things. Some of them are just rocks we liked - ha. The up-close photos to follow I wanted to see if anyone would mind helping identify/confirm? That would be great, thanks!!
  7. I got out for a very short fossil hunting trip for Pleistocene fossils a couple days ago and recorded the hunt. I labeled everything I found as I found it to help others know what is being found, and went over what everything was at the end. Check it out if you get time:
  8. Creekin' for Shark Teeth!

    @Cris and myself went on another brutally hot fossil hunt to the creek yesterday. We went for just a few hours, and were very pleased with the results! We found a couple roughed up Megalodon teeth, some very nice Mako's, a big crocodile tooth, and my favorite find of the day was a killer three-toed horse tooth! I'm gonna go rest my back now
  9. Hello! This is my first time posting on the forum. My family and I got into fossil hunting about a year ago. My two sons (ages five and seven) love dinosaurs just like many kids their age, so while on vacation in Florida, we made a day trip to Venice Beach to look for shark teeth. We didn't even have sifters, but we found a handful of shark teeth and were hooked! We've enjoyed making day trips to Aurora Fossil Museum in NC to "dig the past." We decided to change things up a little and explore Green Mill Run in NC. We live in Chesapeake, VA (near Virginia Beach), so Greenville is about two hours and twenty minutes away. Aurora is about two hours and forty minutes away. We brought a large shovel and a few screens. I have a couple of small hand sifters (intended for baking) that the boys can get a good handle on. We had a medium screen that we bought in Aurora and we zip-tied a pool noodle around it so it would float. This past April, we went fossil hunting in the Peace River in Florida, so hunting at Green Mill Run was similar. The water level was pretty low (a foot high or less) and there was plenty of shade so the boys could take a break from the sun. At first, I tried digging around a rock to see if any teeth were caught up in there. I would get about an average of three teeth per shovelful. It was great to be finding so many teeth like in Aurora while also keeping cool in the water! After about an hour, I decided to try moving around to different spots where I saw lots of rocks instead of sticking one place. This approach yielded even more teeth. We walked away with lots of shark teeth, squid pens (they're called pens, right?), and other fragments that seemed significant. We hunted for about two hours until the boys were ready to go and a bit hangry (I did pack a lunch...). I could have stayed all day, but they were a bit tired after the long car ride--and we still had to go back in the car to get home. It was a great first trip there and I'd love to go back! My husband was a bit worried about the possibility of snakes, but we didn't see any at all. I would definitely recommend water shoes because there was A LOT of glass in the sand. My seven-year-old son makes videos of our fossil hunting trips for his YouTube channel, which he calls Dino Study. If you want, you can watch it below. My five-year-old son doesn't like making as much of an appearance on camera, so there is a little less footage of him. The best finds included a nice, large sand tiger tooth (found by my seven-year-old) and a large great white tooth (I believe) that I found from the surface. Most of the teeth from the day. I saw this and thought it could be a molar of some kind or perhaps just a conveniently-shaped rock. I have a photo of the top and bottom.
  10. Pleistocene Fosssil Hunt!

    My girlfriend Ashley and I got out to hunt some Pleistocene sites a couple days ago. There are also Eocene sharks teeth mixed in. The rivers are all pretty high, so we went to some bank hunting sites I have found over the years. They definitely did not disappoint! We found a Tapir jaw section, horse tooth, some pretty big alligator teeth, and a variety of other fossils!
  11. Greetings Guys! I had a question for you guys if you don't mind. I'll try to keep it simple. ---I am a Newbie at this. ---I finally got to take my first road trip to look for fossils. ---I'm from Louisiana, so not much rock formation around here so I went to the Appalachian foothills in North Carolina. ---I stopped at multiple locations where there were streams, rock formations, etc. --Couldn't find a thing until my last stop, which was and rock slide. ---I found a ton of Crinoids, pretty much every few feet. --I looked for multible hours for trilobites or anything else I could find. This is the question--- Do you guys think I should revisit that place and look a lot more, and be more patient, or should I move on. I only stayed within a 100 yard radius but got wore out. I made two trips to the same spot that weekend. I don't really need anymore Crinoids, but I don't want to pass up what could be a honey hole, and I don't realize it. i don't really know what a honey hole is in fossil hunting. This fall, I would like to go back, but I don't know whether to move or not. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
  12. Shark Tooth and Invertebrate Hunting!

    Cris and I went out to enjoy some brutal summer heat, and find some fossils yesterday! The finds weren't quite as productive as some days at these sites, but we still had an awesome time and found some really cool stuff! The way one of the megs is found is absolutely nerve-wracking. You'll see!
  13. Fossil hunters tromping through fields, forests, pastures, and grasslands should always be careful of tick bites. The upswing in Tick-Borne Meat Allergy is an important reason to be careful of ticks while fossil hunting. What the Mystery of the Tick-Borne Meat Allergy Could Reveal. Unraveling why tick bites are suddenly causing a strange reaction in some people who eat meat could help scientists better understand how all allergies work. The New York Times https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/24/magazine/what-the-mystery-of-the-tick-borne-meat-allergy-could-reveal.html Red Meat Allergies Caused By Tick Bites Are On The Rise Morning Edition, June 25, 2018 https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/06/25/621080751/red-meat-allergies-caused-by-tick-bites-are-on-the-rise A couple of more web pages are: Amblyomma americanum (Lone Star Tick) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amblyomma_americanum NIAID scientists link cases of unexplained anaphylaxis to red meat allergy". National Institutes of Health (NIH). 2017-11-28. https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/niaid-scientists-link-cases-unexplained-anaphylaxis-red-meat-allergy Yours, Paul H.
  14. Hello. My son and I are heading to South Carolina to Summerville area and Folly Beach area to search for Shark Teeth. This is a big trip from California for 4 full days and we hope to find some great fossils. This is August 4th-7th. We are doing an excursion on the 4th. But for the next day or two it is quite hard to figure which creeks/rivers are OK to go to which will give us some luck. Any insights? Checked the forums but it has been hard to find exactly where to go. On the last day we head to Folly beach to see what is there. Any insight on what section to start with? I have been following the tide charts. Thank you!
  15. Hi all, in a few weeks I’m going to be driving down to Charleston with my two boys and our dog. We are planning to make the drive over several days, fossil hunting at each stop. First stop will be Calvert cliffs area. It’s about a 4-5 hour drive for us. I’ve only been there twice, would love some suggestions on which area to hunt. Other than that, I haven’t planned where else to go. We will try to stick to the I-95 corridor, happy to make excursions off the route for anything that would be interesting. My kids are really excited for this, and so am I! Thanks!
  16. Fossils and Friendship in Alaska

    Southeast Alaskans, visitors find awe and friendship in fossil hunting Posted by Alanna Elder, July 23, 2018 https://www.kfsk.org/2018/07/23/southeast-alaskans-visitors-find-awe-and-friendship-in-fossil-hunting/ Geologic Map of Baranof Island, Southeastern Alaska https://pubs.usgs.gov/sim/3335/ Yours, Paul H.
  17. Hi all, So after learning of the inaccessibility of the location Lacoste, I was wondering if there was maybe another location nearby. On Fossiel.NET I found the location Carniol, which looks very promising! https://www.fossiel.net/sites/fossil_site.php?plaats=148 Anyone got any tips on how to best find fossils and bring them home? How to look, how to take the fossils out, etc? Any tips or comments would be greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance, Max
  18. Hi all, Currently I am on holidays in the south of France. We were thinking of maybe going tomorrow to the location Lacoste, in the Vaucluse, in France, to hunt for Miocene bivalves. This is the location where all those amazing giant white scallops (which you often see for sale at exhilarating prices) come from! Anyone got any tips regarding the hunting there? As in how to find the best fossils, how to extract them properly, etc? If we do end up going, I will, of course, make a trip report on this forum I'll be tagging the French fossil hunters, perhaps you guys have already been here and wouldn't mind sharing some tips/feedback @fifbrindacier @Coco @caterpillar Thanks in advance! Best regards, Max
  19. I recently moved to Calgary from Winnipeg and would like to go fossil hunting - but I don’t know where to go. I am familiar with Alberta’s regulations pertaining to surface collection. I know most people don’t like to give out the locations of their favorite fishing holes or fossil sites. Any guidance you can provide for locations would be appreciated.
  20. Anyone up for fossil hunting?

    This state forum isn’t too active, but thought I’d try my luck. Anyone want to do a trip or 2 this summer? I am completely new but I can listen well, follow directions, and I’m not afraid to work. Let me know and we can set something up!
  21. Isle of Skye, Scotland Fossil hunting on Scotland's Isle of Skye – the "real Jurassic Park" CBS NEWS, June 21, 2018, https://www.cbsnews.com/news/dinosaur-fossil-hunting-in-scotland-real-jurassic-park-isle-of-skye/ Dickinson, North Dakota Public has fun in the dirt at public fossil dig in Dickinson, North Dakota. By: Steve Kirch, My ND Now, Jun 23, 2018 https://www.myndnow.com/news/dickinson-news/public-has-fun-in-the-dirt-at-public-fossil-dig-in-dickinson/1257277888 North Dakota Geological Survey Paleontology 2018 Fossil Digs https://www.dmr.nd.gov/ndfossil/digs/ Fossils in North Dakota (FIND) Newsletter https://www.dmr.nd.gov/ndfossil/kids/ Yours, Paul H.
  22. Any Fossil guidebooks for NC?

    Hey guys, I know there is plenty of generalized information about fossil sites and the formations listed here on TFF, but I was wondering if anyone knew of a specific book, or guide that was specified toward North Carolina only. Maybe even a website that had some good information about the geological history, formations, as well as fossil deposits here in NC?
  23. I'm preparing a teacher education workshop which includes a fossil hunting and identification activity. The teachers are coming from many states across the country. I'd like to include some suggestions of sites where they could replicate the things they learn and experience during the workshop with their students in the vicinity of their respective schools. I have the Indiana schools covered. For the ones near Dallas, I'm thinking Mineral Wells Fossil Park (and maybe Ladonia for older, more adventuresome students). The ones I need help with are sites within field trip range of the following: Austin, TX ( @Uncle Siphuncle, @KimTexan, @BobWill, @erose)? Atlanta, GA Golden, CO Palm Bay, FL (near Melbourne) Naples, FL (any shell dump piles accessible to and suitable for k-12?) @digit ? Bentonville, AR Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated, either posted here or via PM. I have alternative activity suggestions for them (e.g. bags of matrix to sift, etc) if they can't do a field trip, but there's nothing quite like the experience of hunting and discovery in the field... I would have done backflips if my grade school had had a fossil trip...
  24. Fossil Hunting in the Pas-de-Calais So last week was a lot of fun for me. Saturday afternoon we left home to go to northern France, the Pas-de-Calais. We first stopped in Belgium to visit some family, so we only arrived at our B&B near Wissant in the late Sunday afternoon. Our main goal was to go to that region in order to do, obviously, fossil-hunting! And that is what we did. I gotta say that I was (pleasantly) surprised with how things ended up! Read on to see what we found... Day 1: Wissant The evening of our arrival we were walking in the small city of Wissant, which lies in between the two famous Caps: Cap-Blanc-Nez (to the north) and Cap-Gris-Nez (to the south). Therefore it is a popular place for visitors to stay during the holidays, as it is ideally placed in between the two main touristic sites of the area. We had a really nice Bed & Breakfast on the outskirts of the city, so that was good too. Anyways, so we were walking the city to try and find a restaurant for the evening. At some point, I come across this small area where there is very dry mud/sand-like sediment, in the middle of the city. I look inside and there are lots of bones and jaws from different critters! Also a few shells. Although everything was in matrix, I still suspect that the things are modern (in the sense of 'non-fossil'. I'd say it still is a few hundreds of years old.), mainly because the bones are from sheep, cow and the shells are from edible species. So probably remnants of some primitive food-left-overs junk pile or something. There were also deer bones too (roe?), not as sure as to how that got there. Anyways, even though the bones are probably modern, still cool finds IMO! Total haul
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