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Found 6 results

  1. Trigonocarpus3b.jpg

    From the album Carboniferous Plant Fossils in My Collection

    This is another view of the same Trigonocarpus, this view showing the open end of the seed. Seeds of seed ferns - this was probably from Medullosa - had open ends to allow pollen to enter. It is thought they were fertilized by pollen when they dropped into the water although a few paleobiologists believe insects may have pollinated them through the opening. Also why were the seeds encased in a fruit like covering (like avocados)? To be consumed by creatures that lived in the shallow swamp water?
  2. I found this stone in my landscaping that looked interesting. To be clear I think this was moss rock from a stone yard, but I have zero information on where it is from and it has been in the yard for some years. I cracked it open and found lots of what look like plant fossil casts? The sandstone had been sitting wet and came apart surprisingly easily. Also if you are too rough with it the sand falls apart easily so the fossils are kind of delicate. I had some paleobond an applied that to the fossil areas, so they dont break down hope that was ok. It looks like it was an area where leaves and branches etc fell. Bits of bark and leaf patterns and what look like for all the world to me like pinecone or some kind of seed pods. Maybe I'm over imagining things. Any way here are some pictures.
  3. A seedy coat

    Austrian between 4 and 5 Mb A treat,if you ask me.
  4. Land plants evolved from "pond scum" about 500 million years ago, according to new research Very interesting . http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-43116836
  5. Found another interesting specimen on this Nodule from Smokejacks quarry, measuring under a 1.0mm approximately 0.3mm in length, was quite difficult to photograph. First impression due to it’s almost wing like features I would suggest possible insect. As the concretions of sideritic ironstone and fine grained calcareous sandstone have also yielded numerous insect remains including non-angiospermous plants (ferns and cycads, and a Sequoia-type cone). The quarry cuts through a section of the Wealden group, specifically the Weald Clay. The clay was deposited in a lake and floodplain environment during the Barremian stage of the Cretaceous period about 129-128 million years ago.
  6. The Delaware Valley Paleontological Society field trip on Saturday May 13th looked like it was going to be washed out. The weather turned remarkably well. Temps and Humidity were great for pulling down a shale wall. More than 3/4 of the day was trying to start big blocks moving. Much chiseling and prying allowed a tall column to come tumbling down (my foot still hurts). The first picture shows the prying and the layer of Devonian Archaeopteris plants I've been tracing for 3 seasons. The second pictures shows what rolled out. The layer was true to form revealing a beautiful Archaeopteris macilenta frond. This would be my first near whole specimen of this species for me. That is my happy face after some several hours of hard labor. I have a lot of trimming to do and cleaning it up for pictures to submit for IPFOM. Nice start for the 2017 collecting year.
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