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Found 16 results

  1. what fossil is this?

    it looked to me like a leaf fossil but some people dont agree with this identification. What is your opinion ? I found it in Cyprus
  2. Gastropods seem to be quite rare in the tracts of the Bearpaw formation I'm familiar with, so I'm incredibly curious about this lone specimen, the only one I've found. I found it in a hard layer of small conglomerated bivalves, pteria linguiformis, I believe, in sandstone dating roughly to the Campanian-Maastrichtian border. The specimen was collected from the western half of Diefenbaker Lake in southern Saskatchewan. Anyway, here are the photos. If more angles are needed please let me know: Pteria linguiformis (?), which constituted the conglomerate: Thanks for your time.
  3. Help with some dirt road finds.

    Me and my wife went walking some dirt roads. Found so many shells, and these 2 teeth. The big one was pretty busted up. I'm thinking sand tiger and great white. Am I correct?? Thanks! Sorry for the terrible cell phone camera...
  4. Hello kind folks of the fossil forum, I recently had the opportunity to take photos of some of the more rare/unknown fossils found in the fiddlers green member of the Bertie group. All these fossils came from Lang’s quarry in Ilion, New York and are not Eurypterids. I was given permission from Al Lang himself to post these photos. These are from his personal collection. He does like his privacy and doesn’t like people showing up out of the blue. I’m lucky to have met him and received an invitation. I’ll stress this was a huge stroke of luck and he doesn’t often have or want visitors. He was kind enough to let me show these photos, so let’s appreciate this opportunity together. Some of these fossils have been seen by very few people. I was also allowed to take photos of his Dolichopterous specimens which are also exceedingly rare but they will go under a different category on the forum at another time. Now some of these can be found in ontario at the ridgemount quarry but keep in mind these are from a different layer than the Eurypterids found in central New York. The stratigraphy is slightly different across the state. Either way, at least some of these may be described....some maybe not? Photos to come. im going to post the pics together with 2-3 grouped together if they are the same and I’ll separate photos if they are loners. This will make it easier for people to quote photos.
  5. Hello everyone, I kept these from fossil hunts in buffalo years ago cause I knew they were different. I read they split Greenops boothi into 4 different species with 2 variations of Greenops and 2 variations of Bellacartwrightia in 1997. I have some pieces that I’m not really sure which trilobite I’m dealing with. I just know it’s not the Greenops grabaui variety. The cephalon came from basic Wanakah shale that surrounds the “trilo beds” as I was moving blocks. The pygidiums came from the “trilo beds” of the lower Wanakah shale at the Lake Erie shore in Buffalo, New York. I only have “a field guide to Devonian paleontology” by Karl Wilson and “Geology of 18 mile creek” by Grabau for reference. I can’t find anything reliable on the internet either so I’m curious if the kind folks on the forum have an opinion. I do have another book on Devonian paleontology of New York coming in the mail that is more recent but the new paper was written in 1997 and this book is a 1994 book so it may not have the update either. The last 2 pics are comparisons of the pygidium of a Greenops grabaui with the specimens in question to show you why I think they are different. I also just added a last photo of the other side of one of my unsure specimens that’s actually a full trilo but damaged beyond belief...may not help with the ID but maybe it could lol. Thanks Al
  6. Possible fossil?

    Hello everyone hope everyone had a great Thanksgiving! My father got to work yesterday and found this during their construction job. He said it was 9ft underground and says that the black sphere is heavy like metal and popped right out of the rock. Is this a fossil? Thanks for any tips!
  7. Hey everyone, Ive had this odd fossil for years and I do not know what it is. It’s from the Hamilton group, more specifically the lower Wanakah shale, Lake Erie shore Buffalo New York. I have a pic from a great publication I bought (got it in the mail today!) that shows a really great close up of the stratigraphic interval I found it in (Miller year?) it came from one of the 4 trilo beds, I think the top one. I rediscovered it while going through and organizing some old fossils. Now that I’ve joined the forum I have access to more resources! This fossil is 19mm (.75in) long....the length matches the diameter of a US penny. It appears segmented (4 segments) and I actually had to glue 2 segments back together. Each end segments have a peak of some sort. One end has a tall single peak and the other end has a segment with a double peak (but much smaller peaks than the tall single peak on the opposite side). The middle segments are more rounded. The fossil itself seems like remains you would see with trilobites.....that black colored exoskeleton remain on one side and shale on the other but I don’t think it’s a trilo. It just seems like it persevered in a similar way so I think it’s the remains of something “hard” made of calcium carbonate but idk what. I cant even guess.....I only had Grabau’s geology of 18 mile creek book for reference and I don’t see a match. Maybe I just don’t have the access to the paper/book describing this or I do and don’t know it. My guesses (not confident guesses lol) consist of.....conodont? Placoderm? Coprolite? Lump of nothing? Tooth of some kind? Thanks for reading and thank you to anyone that tries to ID this! Al
  8. Possible fossil?

    My father just found this today in North Texas at his job site, is this also an ammonite? It's pretty big. It was dug up 9ft under ground.
  9. Iowa Mandible (Deer?)

    Hello! I found this mandible yesterday in a creek in Linn County, IA. It reminds me of a modern whitetail deer, but I'm not sure. One thing that stands out to me is that the middle tooth has three labial lobes. I have a modern whitetail doe adult to compare it too (see last picture), but only the end tooth has three labial lobes. Does that mean this isn't a whitetail deer or is that normal genetic variation? Total length of mandible (broken): 83 mm Thickness of mandible: 19 mm Width of tallest tooth: 20 mm Thickness of tallest tooth: 9.4 mm Thanks! @Harry Pristis
  10. Big Brook NJ Fossil Finds

    Hello! i am new to this forum and will use this opportunity to introduce myself. I am from. NYC and made my first visit to Big Brook in Monmouth County NJ because my two children (4&6) are very interested in ancient sharks and reptiles. We were so excited to learn how easy it is to find fossils locally. Could anyone assist us in identifying the tooth shown below next to the goblin shark tooth? I just realized I didn’t include a scale reference, but I know that the goblin shark tooth is slightly longer than 1”. I apologize if I haven’t followed certain board etiquette. Please let me know and I will be sure to adhere in the future. Thanks!
  11. What is this?

    My dad claims this is a dinosaur egg. I'm just wondering if his claims are true! Says a general in China "re appropriated a couple" from Henan Province when they dug up a bunch! Much Thanks :D.
  12. Hi folks, This is my first attempt at id'ing small braciopods and coral. Could you please give some input on if I am wrong or right. They are all from the Devonian period from the Schoharie NY roadcut. The last corals are from the uppermost section of the Becraft limestone.
  13. Hello fellow fossil friends, I guess I should formally introduce myself- I'm David- a long time fossil forum lurker and a first time poster. I'm a geology student at the College of Charleston (where I have some of the best paleo professors in the world might I add) and I have a specimen question. I evacuated the beautiful low country because of our uninvited friend Matthew- which thankfully also gave me the opportunity to stop in my favorite rock shop in Helen, GA. I have bought some pretty cool crinoid and belemnite plates from these folks at a very reasonable price. They are some of my favorite fossils in my growing (college debt be darned) collection. I came across this ammonite lying hidden in the back corner of a table outside. It is from Morocco, an area I know to be notorious for poor fossil samples. I paid by the pound, so I know I probably overpaid- but no mind-you don't run across ammonites in rural Georgia often. Anyways- enough of that. I took a look at the sutures (visible in one picture) and the distinct oak leaf shape pattern led me to believe it was originally a Cleoniceras. However the septal surface has more texture (ie the defined "bumps" on the main body) than the Cleoniceras. I'm beginning to think it could be a Mammites Nodosoides or a Choffaticeras. Even if I overpaid I am going to make an attempt to prepare the fossil as my first major project in prep in my free time. How much of a problem is the calcite vein running through the upper portion of the shell- and is there any reason I shouldn't be set on preparing it? (This thing could be a fake for all I know- but it seems to not be complete and has a fair amount of weathering and unevenness for someone to go through the trouble of faking an unprepared fossil to sit on a table on the side of a country backroad- but hey you never know!) I understand this is a lengthy post for one simple question but I felt an introduction was in order. I also did as much research as I could before asking for help (emailed the pictures to the fine instructors at the college already). Any assistance is greatly appreciated. Thanks for your time!
  14. Need ID on fieldstone fossil

    Not sure if anyone would be able to clarify what is in this stone. Thanks
  15. Taeniopteris Sp.?

    Hi Guys A few days ago, (25 of January) I found this teanopteris looking leaf. It was found at The Skillion (Terrigal Headland), NSW Australia. It is my first cycad! It is well preserved, and… HUGE. If it is a teanopteris, which is what i'm hoping one of you guys can tell me Thanks.
  16. Unknown Minnesota Fossil

    This was found in Taylors Falls, MN in a roadcut. It is about 7 centimeters long and is found in rock containing shell fragments. Can anyone identify it? edit: Images will not load (page stopped responding?)
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