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Found 6 results

  1. Possible Baronyx teeth?

    Hello, im stef and from the UK. i have had these a while and always wanted to get them looked at. i know there were 3 types of dinosaur that lived in south East England : the Megalosaurus Warkerii trio of which Baronyx belongs to. any ideas? If you would like close ups, different angles etc to help please let me know. This could be interesting! Kind regards Stef
  2. Categorise this as 'just for fun', and don't get your hopes up for much fun. I've been doing some '[word wrongly auto-censored] packet' calculations (this is British for writing on the back of a cigarette packet, not a slur) about how many ammonite fossils may be extant on the earth. I'm not a mathematician. I'm the opposite of a mathematician, whatever that is. But I started my calculations based upon a single rock formation which I know well, to see if I could use that to work from. If we look at the Toarcian Beacon Limestone formation in the UK - which spans at least twenty miles in a single direction and is around five metres thick (significantly thinner at the coastal end, I think). Ammonites are abundant in this rock, with many layers being packed full of them. In a single square foot of material, you will sometimes find dozens of ammonites. In a single square-foot section vertically through the entire formation, I'd say that you'd easily find 100 ammonites. That's probably an underestimate. So on that basis, if we assume a total of thirty square miles for this formation, we have 836,352,000 square feet. Assume 100 ammonites per square foot (all the way down through the formation), that's 83,635,200,000, or eighty-three billion, six hundred and thirty-five million, two hundred thousand ammonites preserved. Now, that's got to be way out. For a start, the formation varies in different locations, both in thickness and number of ammonites present. It is probably not present at all in many areas (though there are quite a few outcrops). Has anyone ever attempted to make an rough estimate at how many ammonites may be preserved in the earth? It's interesting to think; the Beacon Limestone formation is five metres thick, and represents about eight million years of sedimentary deposition. Barely any of the ammonites that lived during that time, in this area, are preserved in this formation. Makes you wonder how many ammonites must have swam in the oceans over all those millions of years. The Beacon Limestone
  3. Is this some sort of fossil egg?

    I found this while looking for shells and shark teeth is this some sort of fossilised egg maybe? Approx 5cm long
  4. Petrified / fossilised tree section

    From the album Nigel's album

  5. Hello. On my stretch of the Northumberland coast in England I have found evidence of petrified trees, such as this stump. I can find no information about them online in my location, so please could you tell me (based on this stump) when would it have been a living tree and probably what type of tree? At various points along the coast the remains are usually within grey mudrock or grainy sandstone, but this stump is in hard solid rock (I don't know of what type; maybe of silt as it's not visibly grainy). What would the environment have been like here when this tree was alive? Anything extra you can tell me specifically about this tree/stump in the context of my location would be gratefully received; I need as much info as possible, so any further sources of location specific help you could point me towards would be fantastic. Thank you very much.
  6. Opalised Dino Tooth? Pic Heavy

    Hello everyone I have recently obtained an opal parcel of rough to cut into gems from the opal fields at lightning ridge Australia, however right before I was about to grind this one rough opal something stood out. I remembered walking in the natural history museum in Sidney Australia and noticed the opalized teeth of varies animals/dinos etc. This one was just like one I had seen many years ago. I cleaned it only; no polish just water and a soft paintbrush as not to alter it. From my research, I found a possible match a Hypsilophodon it lived in the area where lightning ridge opals are found and some recorded fossils of this dino are sometimes unearthed there in small pieces. I have tried to contact museums and or universities as I live near OSU and they have one of the best paleontological programs in the country (or so I’m told) and have not heard back after 6 months of trying from any of them. I would like to know if it is a real opal replacement of a tooth or a lookalike. It measures 13.33mm long X 10.9mm wide X 4.02mm thick. And is very detailed under a microscope with tooth like root. Any ideas? I have cut thousands of opals from rough, and have seen millions of pieces of rough easy, including opalized fossils, even some plesiosaurs teeth but never this. The miner, who sold me the opals, said that he has been finding some opalized dino bone fragments lately but they are unidentifiable as they are crushed, and very small pieces, and I also purchased a opalized finger or toe bone from a very nearby find, possibly a turtle flipper bone.
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