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Found 6 results

  1. Taken from one of my latest posts: http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/2014/01/blue-beach-hantsport-nova-scotia-fall.html I had meant to make a post on my blog on my last trip from last year to Blue Beach, in Nova Scotia but it had slipped my mind. I had brought my new Olympus SLR camera with me to capture snapshots and compare the quality with what I used to take photos with. A bit bulkier than the old gal, but I must admit that I won't miss her much. I can't recall when I went down there, and the data on the camera isn't accurate as I didn't bother setting the right time/date format. On this trek you will notice there's a little of everything spread all over along the beach. South of the Jurassic and Triassic rocks that make up most of the Blomidon Peninsula lies the Carboniferous Horton Formation. These fossil bearing sedimentary rocks stretch from a little South of Hantsport to about Boot Island, North East of the city of Wolfville. The further one ventures South, the more you'll encounter rocks containing evaporites. These would be mostly part of the Carboniferous Windsor group, full of limestones and gypsum, such as in Cheverie (click to see other post on location). Before heading down the path you get to see this The walk through the woods is nice The view as soon as you turn left walking down the path. These stratum have marine animals such as bivalves, brachiopods, and fragments of other animals. I've found some shale with arthropod traces in this area. I've mostly found them further North though. Some nice traces Rusophycus and cruziana from what I can tell There is also a good amount of plant material found along the beach. Fish scales Tree section Mechanical or actual tracks? Diplichnites Section of the cliffs where some of the bigger traces were found, further North. Tracks? Rusophycus (largest I've seen here so far) Last year was a great season and Blue Beach didn't disappoint. It's one of these places where it keeps attracting you. It will be one of my first beaches to hit when the ice starts to melt. The cliffs keep working out new material, so every time is a new adventure. Till next time... - Keenan
  2. Martin Head

    Taken from my blog: http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/2013/08/martin-head-southern-new-brunswick.html First trek to Martin Head but not successful at finding any fossils, yet. =) There's a place, called Martin Head, located just West of Fundy Park that people having been going to for a very long time. I've been talking to people and every time I mention camping sites, people would ask me: "Have you gone to Martin Head yet?". As it turned out I hadn't, so thus became an item that went up in my 'To do' list. Martin Head is a mash up of very old and not as old rocks. The 'island' which goes by the name Martin Head is made up mostly of Cambrian rocks, or even older. The basalts are mixed with some sedimentary rocks of about the same age, and some mineral deposits (I couldn't find which type of minerals occurred). The section between the island and the beach which includes some sections of the cliffs are of younger age, dating close to the Late Triassic. Click here for information about the fossilized Sand Dunes of Martin Head. These are mostly buff or reddish sandstones. There is a small section that juts out from between these Triassic sedimentary rocks and much older rocks. This small segment of rock is mostly composed of limestones and gypsum from the Early Carboniferous. The rocks further inland that make up most of the cliffs are much older than the rest. These Neoproterozoic-aged rocks are mostly volcanic in origin. Getting there is rough, very very rough. To get to Martin Head from Alma, you have to cross the park come out at the park's Sussex exit (since the road goes straight to Sussex). Near the park exit is Shepody road that heads West. This is a rough dirt road, as in 'just being graded' rough with rocks the size of my fist in some places. About half an hour or so, you take Goose Creek road that snakes South and takes you through old mountains. Going down the road in what sometimes seemed like a dry river bed, I seriously started to doubt myself and if my car would be able to make it back up. Worse, there were thundershowers in the forecast, so the road could be hell if they water started to turn this into a mudslide. I was surprised to see trucks pulling campers up and down the road. Hard enough to make it alone with my car, but a truck pulling a camper? Nuts! The drive was super rough, but it was gorgeous and very well worth it. After another hour on this gauntlet of rocks, I made it to the beach. The 'island' I made my way close to the island but the tide had just started to go down, making it difficult for me to cross the usually dry path to reach it. I met up with a fella from Saint John that was enjoying the ATV trails and got a call that some heavy rain was coming our way. I abandoned any attempt to reach the island and headed the other way to check the rocks before heading back out. Foreboding clouds raining on my parade I doubt there's any macro fossils in these old rocks. Plant fossils have been found in the Triassic sandstones, and the limestone I heard was fossiliferous, but the older rocks, not so much of a trace as I could tell in my short stay. Some of the rocks shows high stress and some faulting. Quartzite and rhyolites are found amongst some of the basalt and crystal tuff. Some layers that look like schist show this dark rock that's been ground to a fine powder. With the dark clouds coming in and the feeling of a few rain drops on my face, I turned around and made my way back to the car. As the car slowly crawled up the steep road for what felt an eternity, the rain started to fall. I could feel rocks rolling down the road, and the leaves of the trees making up the thick canopy of the forest rustling and shaking. After finally making up the toughest stretch of road, it stopped raining and the sky cleared up again. The road was in better shape that I thought. The rains hit more inland and spared me and my car from potentially what could have been a very bad day. I drove back towards Alma by going through Fundy Park, stopping briefly to take a few photos of the highest vantage point in the area. Fossil cliffs of Cape Enrage, with lighthouse at end of cape (far right) Alma wharf at low tide I was famished at this point, so I stopped at the Tides Restaurant in Alma for supper. I love the food there and I've been going there as often as I can. They're only open during tourist season, so I make the most of it. Satisfied with my meal, I end my stay in Alma and head back towards Moncton, but not before checking out the boutiques in Hopewell Cape to pick up some trinkets. I was happy with this trip, but bummed out I didn't get the opportunity to explore more the Triassic rocks for potential fossils. I'll have to plan this better and head out with a different vehicle. I just can't bear seeing my Volkswagen rabbit going through that road hell again. Till next time! - Keenan
  3. Bay Of Fundy Fossil?

    Hello, I was walking along the Bay Of Fundy in New Brunswick, along the Dover area, when I saw something in a cracked-open boulder lying along the side of the road. Anyone have any idea what this might be? I went back this summer to see it again, but it was gone (probably due to erosion...everything on that side seems to be slowly sliding into the mud).
  4. Cheverie / Hantsport, Nova Scotia

    Taken from my blog post: http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/2013/06/cheverie-hantsport-nova-scotia.html I had planned to go back to Blue Beach in the Avonpart area for a while now. The site and other neighboring lcoations have always yielded wonderful specimens and I was itching to get back on the beaches and under the warm Nova Scotia Sun. I hadn't had the chance to hit the road for weeks due to some illness, but seeing the opportunity to go on a day trip, I took it. 1st stop Cheverie (red), 2nd stop Hantsport (red) 3rd and final stop Parrsboro (blue) (red path - from Moncton to stop #2 in Nova Scotia ) (blue path - from stop #2 to #3 in Parrsboro, then back to New Brunswick) I had planned to make a few stops in the Windsor area along the coast. I'd decided to check the white beaches of Cheverie and its gypsum cliffs. These evaporites were left from an ancient body of water, the Windor Sea. Gypsum makes up big sections the area, and is intermixed with very fossiliferous limestones and shales, from Cheverie to across the bay at Blue Beach, which would be my second stop. Stop #1 Cheverie is a few hours from Moncton, about 3 hours drive one way. I took the scenic route via Walton to drive along the coast. The drive itself was excellent as the weather couldn't have been better. Sunny with +30 degrees Celcius along the coast, what more can one ask? I left Moncton at around 7:30am and arrived at my first destination at about 11am. There was some road construction so that added a few more minutes to the trip. Parking on the side of the road, I grabbed my camera and proceeded down the beach. These cliffs are mostly composed of gypsum, with some limestone outcrops jutting out from time to time in some areas. Gypsum outcrop Horsetail White beaches of Cheverie After a short walk on the beach, I packed my gear and headed on the other side of Avon River, to Hantsport. My second stop that afternoon was Blue Beach down Bluff Road. I've been here a few times before and there is so much to see. The outcrops at Blue Beach are abundant with fossils from the Carboniferous Period, with layers transitioning between land- and water-type paleoenvironments. Stop #2 The shale and mudstone are rich in fossils, with numerous brachiopods and bivalves, fish scales, bones, and arthropod trackways. Some of the other sediment type such as some of the sandstones contain various well preserved plants and tetrapod tracks. Scales Shells Bone Arthropod and worm feeding and resting traces Outcrop where loose material contained many fossils Molluscs in groups Bones Possible trackways? Tree segment with bark impression Diplichnites (arthropod tracks) Trackways (?) - fossil plant part of the sandstone block I spent a couple of hours on the beach and kept coming up on a lot of material to look at. When it was time for me to leave, I noticed that I had only walk a tiny fraction of the beach that I had initially intended to. This site deserves another visit really soon from yours truly to check the rest of the beach. Having spent most of the day on the other side of Cumberland, I thought that it would be nice to have a bite in Parrsboro, across the Minas Basin. It was 4pm and I realized that it would be a 2 hour drive, or detour, but the Sun was out in full and the drive would be nice, especially driving along the coast. I packed up my stuff, and made my way towards Parrsboro, which would end up being stop #3. I drove into town and went down Two Island road to finally end up at the Harborview Restaurant, which had opened a few weeks earlier for the season. The food's great and you just can't beat the view. View from outside the restaurant Even though I wasn't able to hit all the spots I wanted, it was a very nice and productive day. Being cooped up in the house with the flu for two weeks, it was nice to catch some vitamin D from the good fiery globe in the sky. I arrived back in Moncton at about 8:30pm, but I could have kept on going. I will definitely have to swing back by that area very soon. Till then, cheers! - Keenan
  5. Taken from my blog: http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/2013/04/red-rocks-mcgahey-brook-cape-chignecto.html I've been catching up on a lot of past trips I made in the Maritimes that I didn't have time to post on my blog. One such trip was a rockhunting trek in Nova Scotia in the Advocate Harbour area, West of Parrsboro. Site (circled in red), Isle Haute (bottom left) The topography of the southern Chignecto region is very faulted, showcasing the collision of this part of the continent with North Africa some 400 million years ago, forming the ancient Supercontinent Pangaea. The Carboniferous strata of this regions has been folded and faulted in spectacular fashion, neighboring Jurassic (Early) age basalts from North Mountain, which you can see at Cape d'Or and other locations along the Minas Basin, and rhyolites in the West (ie. Spicer's Cove). Cape d'Or is especially known for its natural copper deposits, once mined in the early 1900s. 1- Actual Location (C-H Carboniferous, Early - Horton Group) CC - Carboniferous, Late - Cumberland Group (ie. Joggins) 2- Cape d'Or, Copper deposits, basalt lava flows, major fault 3- Jurassic, Early - North Mountain basalts (various overlapping lava flows) Isle Haute, composed mainly of basalt (Jurassic) Since the last ice age about 11,000 years ago, the area was uplifted. The land rebounded, leaving raised beaches on top of the cliffs with layers of glacial till. Because the region was involved in this tectonic tug of war, whatever fossils found in the rock has been worked mostly beyond recognition. There are some rare fossils that escaped this calamity, but they are very scarce indeed. Sandstone and other types of sedimentary rock had been metamorphosed, pulled apart and pressed, warped, and molded. Beading, sandstone under tectonic stress Tremendous pressure applied to these rocks introduced minerals such as quartz (quartzite). The shales and mudstone are practically pulverized, ground into a very fine material, resulting in this dark sand all over this beach. Glacial striation for fault scarring? Horsetail (related to ancient club mosses, lycopsids) Nice folding! Folding and faulting Sedimentary strata changed under incredible stress Morphology drastically being modified in several episodes This area is very fascinating and exciting. Here is a place where you can witness the continent being pushed around and shaped over and over during a very long period of time, in various ways, due to harsh and extreme forces exerted by the tectonic activity at the time of continental push and separation over 400 million years. The scale of it is amazing on the grandiose scale to the micro level of change. This shows that rocks can be very malleable under great stress. What doesn't bend, eventually breaks. Cheers!
  6. Snowy Cape Enrage (Cap Enragé)

    From my blog: http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/2013/04/cape-enrage-in-february.html In February I got hit by a bad bug, a flu that knocked my on the floor for a week. Being sick for a few days had sapped a lot of energy and it was driving me nuts. The forecast had called for a sunny and warmer weekend, so I told myself that I had to make an attempt to get out of the house and get some fresh air. That Saturday did indeed turn out to be a sunny and warmer one, so I hopped in my Volkswagen Rabbit and decided to go for a drive South towards Alma. I drove down Riverside-Albert and decided to head towards Cape Enrage. The roads were somewhat in fair conditions when I reached the Cape Enrage road. It was plowed to a certain section and then abruptly stops after the 90 degree bend close to Waterside Beach where I had spent quite some time doing stratigraphy. The road were snow covered but barely an inch in thickness, BUT what could have made my trip short was the steep hill I had to drive up to get to my destination. There was a whole whack of tracks of many failed attempts to get up the hill, but I was confident my bunny was able to do it. After a few kicks and the car traction kicking in a few times, I was able to make it to the top! I drove a few hundred meters then turned around and chose a parking spot. I was proud that my car made it to the top, but I didn't want to risk driving down the hill on the other side where the snow was thicker and more packed. There was a single set of tire tracks from what looked like a 4x4 vehicle, with spots along the road where it apparently struggled to make it up. From the car it took me about 30 minutes to get to the beach. The only sound I heard was the wind, the snapping of branches, and the crunching of snow with each step I took. All around me were fresh animals tracks of all sorts: foxes, mice, rabbits, birds, all criss-crossing the road. Bunny! (or Hare) By the time I reached the beach, I was sweating and feeling it. The Sun was beating on me and I was still not feeling 100%, but I was glad to have made it this far. I walked down the beach and towards the East cliff section. I strolled about at the foot of the cliff to see if there was anything that had come loose but surprisingly, nothing. Nothing had really changed since last fall, and that was a little disappointing. But the matter of fact is, I was happy to have come here and recharge my batteries. I had never seen this area under snow and it was very nice, very serene, with only the waves and the wind for sound. I'll be back in the area soon but on the other side West of here to find any changes in the local topography. Who knows, there might be more trackways waiting to be found.
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