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Found 537 results

  1. Unknown Gastropod

    I had to make a trip to the "big" city of Rochester, Mn today. As I drove by a new building site that exposed some Decorah Shale, I had to make a stop. The Decorah Shale is an impervious layer that keeps pollution from seeping into deeper rock layers and contaminating our ground water. Obviously, building permits are being obtained without adherence to the zoning which prevents interuption of this great geologic feature! I will drink my own water but collect fossils from these ill conceived sites. While visiting such a site, I discovered this tiny gastropod that I can not identify.
  2. Arene tricarinata

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    Tiny marine gastropod from the Pliocene/Pleistocene micro matrix of the Nutrien Aurora/Lee Creek Phosphate Mine in Auora, North Carolina
  3. Pliocene/Pleistocene Gastropod

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    Ringicula semistriata Nutiren Aurora/Lee Creek Phosphte Mine Aurora, North Carolina
  4. So Many Minis!

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    This assemblage came from one cup (about 340 ml) of micro matrix from Aurora Fossil Museum. Oddly, they are generally much larger than most of what I found in the rest of the matrix. They are all from either the Pliocene or Pleistocene. See album description.
  5. Gastropod from Kakut River

    Not sure what kind of large gastropod this is.
  6. Paulding Gastropod

    I found this very compressed gastropod over the summer at the dump piles in Paulding, OH (Silica Shale, Devonian). I don't recognize it. Any thoughts? @Peat Burns @minnbuckeye
  7. In my last fossil hunting trip to a late ordovician site in the Oslo field I found these 2 fossils. One with a small spiral form, size 1 cm in diameter, seems to be a gastropod, and the bigger one what seems to be a nautiloid with an unusual form, size about 7-8 cm long. Anyone seen something like these before? First the small gastropod or maybe it is a nautiloid too? A small part fell of, so one can see if it has a sihuncle or not, I took these photos of it with a microscope, the first most clear in the cross section: And here is the bigger nautiloid, with the (for me) unusual form:
  8. Here is the next part of my north slope trip pictures. After camping for two days I headed west and stopped on the Canning River to fish for char. The gravel bar I landed on had pieces of fossil coral and the river cut bank was of the same Kingak Shale with some large concretions. The view out of the plane shows the Ignek valley, east and west. After fishing headed west and stopped at the Kavic Camp for fuel, bring cash as avgas is $12 a gallon and glad to get it! Saddelrochit Mountains Looking west Ignek River valley Looking east Ignek River valley with Ignek Mesa behind the rear lift strut. Coral present in Canning River bed. Pingo- a feature of permafrost, ice lens buildup of up to 300/400 foot elevation. Polygons- ice lens in the soil giving the polygon shapes seen next to the pingo. No place to land here or would have checked it out. Reached the Colville River in the evening and flew all the way to the Killik River where the Colville takes a sharp bend. Killik River Colville River at the Killik River bend. Upon returning home read that there are known dinosaur track ways there and would have like to hike over and see them. Camp at Killik River ( the next day) Landed for lunch and was greeted by several bunches of caribou Kobuk and caribou bone Lignite present on most of the gravel bars. Colville River bar where fossils were seen. Bone or antler fragment.
  9. Unknown ordovician fossil

    I foud these two stones on a fossil hunting trip some weeks ago. The fossil on the below stone seems to be a gastropod (size about 3 cm), but is the other a sponge? Anyone have an idea? Both are from middle ordovicium, Oslo-field in Norway. Martin
  10. Devonian Identification Dilemma

    Recently I have taken interest in fossil hunting after discovering a plethora of fossils from some farmland in Southern Indiana. It is my understanding the fossils are from the Devonian period. My grandsons (5 and 6 years old) and I have collected several specimens I’ve the last couple of months. I have been searching the Internet for weeks trying to correctly identify our finds and just when I think I have something identified —I find other possibilities. I would like to make displays for the grandkids and label our other collections appropriately. I am in hopes this community would help identify the specimens, and provide advice on how best to label the fossils. I appreciate any assistance that can be provided. Thanks. —Bill Shingleton PS: All the fossils depicted are from Jeffersonville, IN.
  11. Bellerophontid from DSR

    From the album Middle Devonian in Central New York

    Retispira leda Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Moscow Formation Windom Shale Deep Springs Road Lebanon, New York Collected 7/18/20
  12. From the album Middle Devonian in Central New York

    Gastropod: Paleozygopleura hamiltoniae Bryozoan: Leptotrypella amplectens? Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Upper Ludlowville Formation Brookfield, New York Collected 7/18/20
  13. Hello all, I have a few fossils that do not fit into the ID categories of topics I have already created so I will post them here. This first one I have no idea what it is, it has an asymmetrical shape with a beak-like portion to the shell that curves to one side. It is somewhat similar to a modern slipper limpet. I don't know if this is a gastropod, pelycopod, or something else. I am not expecting to get a genus or species for this thing since all of the shell is missing but being able to identify it to some extent would be great.
  14. Today I joined a local club on a trip to a dolomite quarry (Ordovician, Galena Group) in northern Illinois. This was the first trip of the year as the rest have been cancelled. The quarry was quite massive, so social distancing was not a problem. We hunted in rock piles in the middle of the quarry (very far from the high walls) that were scheduled for crushing. It was quite a beautiful place. Besides some hammering, all I heard were large birds that were circling above. The fossils found here are pretty standard for the Ordovician rocks in the area. The Galena Group here seems to be a lot more dolomized than further north in say Minnesota, so most of what is found are molds. Fisherites were somewhat common. They were quite massive so I only took home a small chunk of one I broke up. The most abundant fossils were these gastropods, I think Maclurites. They were everywhere but rarely came out complete. Hormotoma gastropods were also present. I believe this is a cranidia of the trilobite Thaleops.
  15. ID help on gastropod fossil

    I currently have this fossil temporarily written down as Bembexia suclomurginata based off some pictures i’ve seen but i need more clarification. I’m not sure where it was found, the seller never clarified the location.
  16. Late Carboniferous Gastropod

    Possible ID of Trepospira sphaerulata from a local gastropod expert, but he isn’t sure. Similar ones in a group with original specimen at the right. Left is suspect of being related, but it might be.
  17. Gastropod / Unknown Bone

    Below is gastropod and was wondering a couple of things. Found NSR up from the Ladonia Park. What species to label it. Second though is it is heavy for its size. I know weight doesn't matter a lot but it is unusual. It is a different matrix from the normal NSR black or red gastropod steinkerns normally found there. Ok, the really unusual part it smells like metal. Like when you hold coins in your hand and they have the metallic smell. This has that smell and your hand smells just like it after holding. Maybe thinking to much into this but just is different. Bone fragment same location. Might be to worn to label.
  18. Hello, I would like to ask for opinions about this 5 mm "tall" gastropod. Its from the Langhian - Miocene (15 Ma old) "Florianer Schichten" of the Styrian Basin in western Styria, Austria (St. Josef, site Fuggaberg-3). Other molluscs at this site are Granulolabium, Terebralia, Anadara, Acanthocardia, tellinid bivalves, oysters, naticids, buccinids etc. Many thanks for your help! Franz Bernhard
  19. Crockett/Stone City unknowns

    Hello all! I made my first trip to the famous Eocene Texas location a few weeks ago and have a few things that remain a mystery to me. I have perused the forum and was able to ID most of my finds from jkfoam's informative replies and many topics from other members. However, several of the gastropods below resemble species I have already identified, but they're not quite the same, so I'm unsure exactly what they are. Not all the images have a scale, but they are all micro fossils under half a centimeter in length. Thank you in advance for any help you can offer! (1) I know this is an ootolith, but I cannot differentiate between the two most common kinds. Help would be appreciated, especially as I only have two of these guys and they are the same. (2) Initially I believed this to be an ootolith as well, but after cleaning it, I really have no idea. Image is front & back. (3) Here is another that I believed to be an ootolith but now have doubts about. Image is front & back. (4) This appears very crab-esque to me, but again, I have no idea. (5) Could this be Bolis enterogramma? I can't find enough images on the web to say I am confident with my ID on this one. (6) I have this (and many others) down as Polinices sp., however I cannot tell the difference between these and Neverita sp. so the ID could be incorrect. Could someone clarify the differences for me? (7) Mystery gastropod (two views; same specimen). (8) Another similar mystery gastropod (two views; same specimen). (9) This is one that looks similar to some I've already IDed, but just different enough to make me believe it is something else. (10) I believe these two are the same species, but when they get this small (some of my smallest; only a few millimeters long), I find it difficult to tell. For all I know, these could be ice cream cones.
  20. From the album Middle Devonian in Central New York

    Paleozygopleura hamiltoniae Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Marcellus Formation? Delphi Falls, NY Collected 5/16/20
  21. Gastropod from the Hamilton Group

    From the album Middle Devonian in Central New York

    Murchisonia micula Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Marcellus Formation? Delphi Falls, NY Collected 5/16/20
  22. Urban Fossil ID

    Hi! First time posting! :-) I've been hunting around for "urban fossils" in my city. I'm really used to seeing rudists everywhere, and whenever I come across anything else (like a piece of coral or a gastropod) I get excited. Today I saw something I had supposed was a gastropod shell section (now I'm not so sure), but it has a peculiar design, and I wonder if anyone can tell me what this design is. It seems to be some kind of internal structure in the shell? I'm attaching two photos of a close up of two different specimens and then a broader picture of another part of the slab, in case anything else in there might give people hints. The photos were taken in Donostia, Spain. I can't really say where the rock was quarried, but I guess somewhere in Spain? I'd love to hear your take on it! (Both on the "internal structure" and what kind of creature this might be) Thanks :-) Elizabeth
  23. Folks, I found this fossil mollusk from a shale deposit in Northeastern Oklahoma. The shale is of Pennsylvanian age (probably Chanute formation), and contains other marine fossils. I would appreciate any help with ID. Best wishes.
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