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Found 408 results

  1. I found this last weekend in the Grayson Formation in Tarrant county, Texas. I have never found a Cretaceous gastropod that was so squatty. Most that I find are elongated to some degree or another, but there is no elongation to this one. This was posterior end down in the creek bed embedded in the limestone. I popped it out, but I guess part of it remained in the limestone. I tried to prep the matrix off, but I can’t tell where the matrix ends and the shell begins since it appears to be a steinkern. There is no ornamentation on it at all. It is about 36 mm at the widest whole part, but looks like it was at least 50 mm wide at one time. I can’t tell how wide the aperture or last whorl was. The total height of the gastropod is 20 mm tall. The overall shape is lenticular. I don’t think there are many lenticular gastropods in the book I have. I couldn’t find one that matched it. Top view (which is actually the posterior end of the shell) Side view Bottom view (which I believe is the anterior end of it) Any help at all would be appreciated.
  2. Simple Mid-Devonian ID?

    Took advantage of a break from the early wintry weather to go play in my fossil pit out back (London, Ontario), and came upon this. I'm sure this will be a cinch to identify, but i'm drawing a blank. It has ribbing reminiscent of an ammonite, but this was found in the Dundee Fm, Mid-Devonian, so too old for that. Ammonoids from around these parts don't tend to have ribbing like this, nor the appearance of nodes. I was thinking some kind of coiling gastropod. Too large and flat to be a Paleozygopleurid. If it is a gastro, I know how tough they can be to identify from a steinkern, but I thought I'd give it a go. As I'm one of the few on here who have access to Dundee Fm deposits, perhaps it is reminiscent to a similar Devonian formation where one of you collects. Does this seem familiar to anyone? Sadly, try as I might, I couldn't locate any other pieces from this rock, so this is all I have to go on.
  3. This is a continuation of my last post with @UtahFossilHunter going back to the island last minute before the snow flies. This time we tried another outcrop of the Undifferentiated Cambrian (now determined to be the Chisholm Formation) on the search for fossils. Link to Part 1  Here is the map on my last post.  This is the Chisholm Formation at the foot of the mountain.  We went up farther on the mountain and found a contact zone. Being a large dipping anticline going down the slope at an angle, the rock layers get older on the bottom then the top. Other places on the island the rock layers are rotated sideways so we kept going right and slightly down more.  We kept going up and we found some Bonneville gravel.  Further along we found lots of a good structural rock with en echelon fractures from nearby faults. But no fossils. We decided to check a few other rock layers again just in case. The Ordovician Garden City Formation had absolutely nothing. So we went back down and drove to another place where the Silurian Laketown Dolomite outcrops so we hike up and.....  We found our first Silurian fossil! We didn't expect anything to be in this formation. Unlucky for us, it was on a boulder so we thought we had to take out a chunk of it. UtahFossilHunter and I had forgot our chisels but we had our hammers. So for ten minutes we kept trying to break off the chunk it was sitting in. You can see in the pictures the fossil was on a ledge. The bedding layer below was a large chert nodule layer so every time we hit it you could hear little shards zooming by like ricocheted bullets. After that ten minutes while watching the snow clouds make their way across the Utah-Nevada border, we decided to take a risk and try popping the fossil out just underneath the shell. That risk payed off and it came out whole. The lesson here is if you know you might be looking in hard rock layers don't forget your chisels. 
  4. What was this doing in Maryland?

    I’m guessing weathered conch, but VERY bizarre to be seen in Maryland...
  5. Any gastropod expert here?

    I have found a lot of gastropods but I want to know the sp'. And if you can put a link to a identification sorce. Here are some of them:
  6. Hey folks, I was wondering how you guys would approach something like this (or if samples like this are even worth your time!) There's so much going on I'm a little confused as to how and where to start. would you remove the gastropods individually, break the rock apart, sacrifice the broken ones in the search for more complete specimens, leave it as is? I went through the pinned messages and learned a lot, but was curious if anyone's come across similar types of rock and could give some insight. My goal is to hopefully find and extract some of the more complete specimens, and maybe discover some trilobites along the way! The plan was to chisel out as many surface fossils as possible, then strike the rocks with a sledge hammer to break up the pieces, give them a good hard scrubbing, then use my steel picks and chisels to poke around further however the resources provided to me by @FossilDAWG and @Kane (thanks again by the way!) described a number of rare, some now lost, trilobite specices from the same formation found in similar contexts alongside Ceratopea Canadensis, so maybe a lighter touch might be in order? I'm still a little scarred from the time I put a pickaxe right through an almost complete piece of 1st century terra sigillata once upon a dig </3 I'll definitely be looking into air pens/compressors (looking at you ME-9100) as well, but on my pay that's one of those 'somewhere down the line' sorts of purchases. If those are definitely the way to go however, I can always shelve these for that later day...they've been sitting around in a forest for this long, another few months wont hurt! I did notice while cleaning the sample below that there appeared to be two separate matrices, a softer one which I assume was the sand/silt and then the hard dark rock underneath. I've got a much bigger slab with a lot more going on, but I grabbed this little one to practice and learn on! My first target is that crystallized one which is slightly exposed on the top (bottom center of the picture on the right) followed by whatever that is beside it and that mussel looking fellow.
  7. Hi guys! This is a continuation of a previous post focusing just on the sponges. These fossils are from the Capitan Formation, which is Permian Period, Guadalupian Epoch, Capitanian Stage. Because these fossils are in the park, no collecting was allowed, and I can't provide additional images. Any confirmations about the identification or suggestions about a more specific identification are welcome. This trilobite is the only fossil out of these images that was actually found in Carlsbad Caverns, right behind the elevator. Can I get more specific on an ID? Cross section of rugose coral? Sponge? Bryozoan. Acanthocladia? Bryozoan? Crinoid.
  8. Hi everyone, This little guy comes from Carniol, France. It is from the "Gargasian", Aptian, Cretaceous. Surprisingly, unlike most other finds (so everything except for belemnites), this one doesn't seem pyritized... Anyways. It's pretty flat (because of geological processes flattening it; my gut feeling says that naturally it is meant to be much rounder). Now I'm really not sure if this is a weird heteromorph ammonite or a weird gastropod. I would guess that it is a gastropod simply because they are much more common, but it just looks so weird that I'm stumped. Hopefully you guys can solve my little mystery! If better pictures are needed, which will probably be the case, I will make them. Thanks in advance, Max
  9. So a few more gastropod pics

    So I ran across 2 more gastropods from Sarasota Florida APAC that have been hiding in the garage--well maybe not hiding--just buried in the junk. Doesnt seem to be something common unless I have some tiny ones somewhere. Probably Tamiami Fm. Plio-Pleistocene. Thought they were the same initially and I had lumped them together. But now I see the one on the right has a depressed end. So maybe a Prunum sp. and a Bullata sp? that would be cool. Thanks for the looks and any feedback. Regards, Chris
  10. Hi guys! I don't post here often, but I'm a PhD student in geology, currently working on tropical Paleogene palynology. I'm taking an unrelated class on the Permian Basin and I am working on identifying some of the fossils our class saw in Guadalupe Mountains National Park. I'm not a sponge expert, and I was hoping someone on the forum might be able to confirm or correct my identifications. I might make a follow-up post on the non-sponge fossils we saw on the trip. A bit of background, these pictures were taken in the field with a metric scale, the scale has been cropped out of the pictures and a 5 mm scale bar is added. No fossil collecting was allowed on this trip so I won't be able to provide additional images. The fossils are from the Capitan Formation, which is Permian Period, Guadalupian Epoch, Capitanian Stage. The global stage name is actually named after the nearby El Capitan peak. Amblysiphonella? Archaeolithoporella?
  11. Fossils in marble

    Hello! Can you please help me in identifying the marked fossils and give an estimation on their age? The fossils are found in my office's marble wall and floor coverings. There are many more fossils all over the building. The size of them are generally between 5 and 15cm. Thank you in advance!
  12. Florida Invertebrate trace?

    Hoping someone easily recognizes these and its an easy answer...my initial searches have been fruitless... So I was supposed to be looking for more Florida coprolites in the garage piles of fossils and got sidetracked looking as this large Turbinella columella and just noticed these tan circular markings on it and wanted to know if they were traces of serpulids? Probably Pliocene Tamiami formation, Sarasota County, Florida. Whats fascinating to me is their spiral?/concentric, ornamented/segmented? shape which appears to actually be etched into the gastropod shell itself. Almost look like cross sections of forams. I've scraped a number of the small white serpulid tubes off thinking I'd see a similar pattern but there is no marking beneath them--its perfectly smooth. If it is a tube, I wasnt aware that they could actually score the surface of the gastropod shell--seems pretty neat if thats what going on but maybe its something entirely different. The gastropod, aside from being badly damaged has sponge borings, barnacle and coral encrustration, and serpulid tubes. Most of the circular traces are around 1mm in diameter and a few push the 2 or 3mm size. Thanks for the help! Regards, Chris
  13. Gastropod ID Please.

    Hi Folks, I found this piece a few years ago. There is one problem. I can't remember if this was found at Venice Beach Florida, or Assateage Island Maryland. Anyways there are these reddish/orange gastropods stuck in the matrix. Any of you shell experts know what I got? Thanks in advance. Dave
  14. Short NSR Hunt!

    I got in a 3 hr hunt before the rain and flooding. Once the water started coming up I had to make a quick exit but still got wet. I managed to find a few things.
  15. Galena Gastropod ID

    This Ordovician gastropod is like no others that I have found. Any knowledgeable members able to educate me?? Maybe a strange maclurite?? Love the hollow crystalline interior.
  16. I walked in tracks all day hunting but still managed a few finds. I really like the coprolite full of little fish bones and the Pleistocene horse ankle bone. I believe the little fish jaw is Saurodon.
  17. Lake Michigan Gastropod or ???

    I'm trying to identify my fossils to create a hands on fossil unit for classroom use. These 2 are stumping me (will post second photo in reply, can't attach it here). They look kind of like snail shells but aren't sharp enough for me to be sure. They're more imprints.
  18. Tamiami Gastropod help needed

    Hello gang, Looking for some help on what you might think these little guys are...they've been in the garage for years and recently been freed! Spoil finds from Sarasota County, Florida. APAC spoils.. Plio-Pleistocene. I had cut this Strombus in half sometime ago to look at its internal chambering and recently decided to remove the contents. To my surprise there were all kinds of things in there and I've only photographed a small number of them as they are just too small. I am very curious about what the 4 guys are just to the right of the Strombus. I've not seen something like them before. The last 2 photos on the right show a more detailed look of just one of them. The last whorl form/ornamentation that differs from the uppers is throwing me..I thought maybe they were an immature shell maybe something like Scaphella and then thought maybe it could it be a Sincola? I've got some other shells I'll be digging into as well as I'm still looking for some Ecphoras and echinoid parts and other oddities. I've got this other Strombus below that shows at least 4 other gastropod species within that shows more good promise. , I have a Panope, a Spondylus and a maybe a Marvacrassatella? that I want to open also that I've had in the garage patiently waiting there for me to get around to. To get things really moving I need to finish mixing up some butvar/acetone to add to the shells exterior as some of them are pretty flaky..my swirling project to get that stuff to dissolve is trying my patience again. Thanks for the help/looking. Regards, Chris Thanks! Regards, Chris
  19. sorry i dont know much about fossils and i was wondering what this was
  20. Fossil Coating

    This is a gastropod from the Old Port Frm (ridgely sandstone). I know the fossil is a chert cast coated with Beekite rings. Any ideas as to what the black "crinkled/wavy/ridged" coating between the Beekite & the chert might be? The pattern is different from the rings above it. It is shiny black in sunlight. Fun fact: this came from a public park inside my city limits and was perched on a little pillar of dirt after the rain from the weekend!
  21. Hello, here I am again with a gastropod from the "Florianer Schichten" of the Styrian basin, Austria (Miocene - Langhian). Its from my hunting trip at "Höllerkogel-18", St. Josef, from 08/16/2018: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/87561-fossil-hunting-at-höllerkogel-18-st-josef-styria-austria-miocene-langhian-ca-15-ma-08162018/ It seems to be a Roxania species, possibly close to R. utriculus (Brocchi, 1814) or R. lamarckii (Deshayes, 1863)? Hight of the gastro is ca. 12 mm. What do you think? Thanks for your oppinion! Franz Bernhard
  22. Please ID mollusks

    Please ID species. Found it in Algarve, Portugal (miocene, I guess). I would also ask you to please advise me how to preserve it. Shall I varnish it? Thank you.
  23. Hello. I am have little to no experience in collecting, but have always been fascinated by the beauty and the story of "nature" that exists and existed on our planet. Yesterday, I found this little beauty in my back yard while weeding our landscaping areas that are lined with river rock. We live in Indiana and we had this rock delivered about 17 years ago. Hoping to get some insight other than what my novice research is turning up. Thank you in advance for any input.
  24. Part three to my safekeeping series. These are some of my finds from the middle Devonian Mahantango Formation of Maryland. Unlike the other formations I posted about, this one is pretty well known for it's fossil contents, so I will keep the introduction and background brief. For those who don't know the Mahantango is a middle Devonian aged marine shale that's part of the Hamilton Group in Maryland. For the most part it's fauna is dominated by brachiopods, but occasional gastropods, tentaculitids, and other animals show up as well. It was deposited in a shallow inland sea with the depth of the sea varying over time. This is only a small fraction of what I have, but it's some of the best. Image 1: Spiriferid brachiopod, Mucrospirifer mucronatus? Image 2: Some odd fragment (possibly trilobite related?) with a M. mucronatus. Image 3: M. mucronatus.
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