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Found 228 results

  1. On the west side of the harbour in Oakville, Ontario, they have set up a waterfront with hundreds of big stones from Orillia. They are covered with fossils...many thousands of them, and some quite striking. Last I saw, it wasn't officially open, but it's accessible.
  2. From the album Middle Devonian

    Ptomatis patulus Bellerophontoid Gastropod Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Lebanon, N.Y.
  3. From the album Middle Devonian

    Palaeozygopleura hamiltoniae Loxonematoid Gastropod Encrusted with Leptotrypella amplectens (Bryozoan) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Lebanon, N.Y.
  4. Turritella Gastropod Imprint from Big Brook

    From the album Cretaceous

    Turritella trilira Gastropod Shell Imprint Upper Cretaceous Wenonah Formation Matawan Group Big Brook Marlboro, N.J.
  5. From the album Cretaceous

    Euspira sp. Upper Cretaceous Wenonah Formation Matawan Group Ramanessin Brook Holmdel, N.J. A generous gift from Ralph Johnson
  6. While in Florida I have been doing some fossil shell collecting, I really do love collecting these shells, the diversity is great. I do like finding large and small shells, but the smallest are always my favorite as the quality is usually exceptional. In this post I will show a few pics after I found some of the “regular” size shells and then my haphazard attempt at trying to identify some. Please do not take my ID’s as truth- though I love collecting these shells, I am really bad at getting the ID’s correct. There are a lot of shells that I do not have any ID for and I did not attempt to guess like I did on the others. Some of the specimens that I took pictures of are not the greatest and I have since found better ones, but since I already took the pics, I did not update. I did not take any individual pictures of the smallest pieces, but believe me, some are really small. My favorite find so far- the colors are phenomenal and the glossiness is just crazy- because of this, I thought is might have been a Lindoliva spengleri, but I do not think it is large enough. I believe it is Oliva sayana, and again it is my favorite find. Here are a couple other pics after I picked some up. Now i will start with my attempt to ID some of my finds- this will take a few posts since there are a lot of different ones.
  7. Amazing hunt at the Banjaard

    Hi everyone, I'm really late on this one, but better late than never! On the 6th of April I went to the Banjaard beach again, and although our hunt was short it was super interesting! I started off by searching the coastline, where I found lots of bivalves such as Tridonta borealis, Mya truncata, Mytilus edulis, Arctica islandica, etc. After a while I went higher up the beach and started looking for the gastropod shell banks we had a lot of luck at last time. Unfortunately I didn't manage to find them... which tells me that the banks come and go, and that that previous hunt was just really lucky. However we got lucky again this time, by finding another type of shell bank! This giant 'cloud' you see here yielded a crazy amount of smaller rare fossils!
  8. Hi everyone, Not last Wednesday, but the one before that one, I went to the Zandmotor again for a hunt, and it went well! As soon as I went down on the beach (I was still in the Kijkduin area, not yet on the Zandmotor), so only some 5 minutes or so into the hunt, I found this little ugly thing in the sand: It's a small (slightly incomplete) mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) lamella! It's from the late Pleistocene, some 40'000 years ago. It's nowhere as nice as the previous one I found, but this one's cool too. Still happy to have found it because lately I've really been on a dry spell when it comes to the mammal stuff, so hopefully this is a sign that I'm gonna find some more again. After that, I continued hunting for some 4 hours or so, until the rain chased me away. The weather, although sunny at first, was really not great because there was a lot of wind. This made it a bit colder, but more annoyingly there was sand going everywhere. At some point I was checking out a little sand cliff for some shells, but had to turn my back immediately because the sand was going in my eyes. Also, the 'wich' part of my sandwich became essentially irrelevant... I did make some cool fossil shells finds though:
  9. i have these two gastros I cannot find an ID for. The first one looks like a Strobeus, but that's Pennsylvanian and this one I found in Cretaceous area (sorry, do not know what formation) but it was outside of Clifton TX. The other....I am ashamed to say I cannot remember where I found it....which I know does not help at all, but hopefully someone will recognize. I know it was in Texas and I'm 95% sure it was cretaceous. I take pictures of all my "hoards" from a day of collecting and it is not in ANY of my hoard pictures, so i cannot rightly say where it's from. Probably a random roadside roadcut that I didn't find much but this. Might be Bandera, might be San Saba, might be Hays counties. Any help will be much appreciated! Second One:
  10. gastro tylostoma (3).JPG

    From the album Central Texas Fossils

    Gastopods Snails Tylostoma Found in Hays, Comal, Bandera and Blanco Counties
  11. Hi all, This weekend, after the long, boring and annoying winter months (it's always mildly cold, but very windy and rainy in the Netherlands in winter... horrible fossil hunting conditions) spring finally let out the tip of its nose, with a nice sun, blue sky and decent temperature. About time! We all know what this means... time to do some fossil-hunting! So on Sunday morning I woke up, prepared my fossil hunting equipment (mainly bags and boxes; no tools needed for this beach), made myself a lunch, and set out at 13:00 to the bus. The bus ride to Kijkduin takes me about an hour, so I arrived at the beach at 14:06. But, as usual, because it's by bus I'm not dropped off at the ideal spot, so I have to walk about an hour on the beach, due south-west, to actually get to the Zandmotor. But that wasn't much of a problem... this part of the beach already has a few fossils to yield, although not as many, so you can start the fossil hunting right away. Didn't find anything significant though in that first stretch. You're literally walking on lots of Eemian fossil shells, but these species are all very common. Spisula solida, Cerastoderma edule, C. glaucum, and Macoma balthica are just not worth picking up, unless it's a specimen that stands out to me (unusual size, pathologies, weird colors, etc). Here's a map to better illustrate the places I will mention. Note that it's approximate. Also, the sand cliffs and the shell banks often move around, we are after all on a beach with lots of wind and water movement, so these positions aren't defined. But this is what was the case this weekend. And the pink Zandmotor "limit" isn't accurate either, it's more my view as in "this is good fossil-hunting territory". By the way, that red S is where the bus drops me off. Oh, and that big puddle in the middle of the beach is actually a very popular kite-surf spot, especially for amateurs because there are no waves. This time I started off the hunt at the "sand cliffs" as I like to call them, (2m tall at the highest point, so not real cliffs), then went on to an area more to the south of the Zandmotor (at the bottom of the dark blue line on the map). It was my first time properly hunting that little area, and it turns out it's actually a good spot, I found lots of good bivalve fossils there! After an hour or two I sat down to eat my lunch (yes, a very late lunch, but time flies by when you're fossil hunting! I'm actually still surprised I remembered to eat my lunch at all, I usually get so caught up in the hunt that I often just completely forget to eat my lunch at all ), then went onto the richest part of the Zandmotor when it comes to shells, the..... (drumroll please)............. shell banks! I know, very unexpected! The real Eemian shell banks are usually lying on the north-center of the Zandmotor, between the cliffs and the shoreline. That is when I made my two favorite finds of the day: a gorgeous Propebela turricula, and a bit later, Gari fervensis! After a total of about 5 hours hunting, I decided it was time to get back home, so I called it a day. But man was it a good day! I found an incredible diversity of fossil shells, especially bivalves. Onto some pictures, starting with some location pics.
  12. Florida Fossil Hunting Part 1

    No trip to Florida from those of us 'up north" should happen without at least bringing back some shells and in my case, fossil shells. And no shell collector identifying his/her finds should go without having @MikeR give his opinion on IDs. (By the way, Mike, I skipped Shell Creek after an invite by Shellseeker to visit the Peace River). Next time!) Trying to attach a genus and species to Floridian fossil gastropods and bivalves is VERY difficult. I will be happy if I bat 50% on my identifications. It is for this reason, I hope Mike can peek at my finds. With that said, the shells found in this post were found by me just milling around the Sarasota/ Bradenton area east of I-75. Yes these were construction sites, but most were inactive, not a sole to be seen, and without "no trespass signs". Infra structure for the next phase (home building) had been already completed. People were walking dogs, riding bikes, or just strolling around. Fossil shells are SO abundant in Florida. If dirt is showing, fossils are in it! Just need to stop your car and look if in the area. Now to show what can be found. Over 50 different species were discovered in only a few hours in the early morning before my family awoke. Enjoy and please correct any misidentifications!!!!! As I said, this is Part 1. I can't begin with Part 2 until those fossils arrive in the mail. Part 2 involves assistance by forum members @jcbshark, @Shellseeker, and @Sacha. These are three wonderful individuals that deserve ALOT of praise for putting up with me!! This report will follow soon. Well maybe later since I am relying on the mail service!
  13. I am thinking about donating some of my fossils to a University or Museum but are they good enough that they would be interested.How do I find out?
  14. From the album Cretaceous

    Pugnellus sp. Gastropod Internal Cast Upper Cretaceous Wenonah Formation Matawan Group Ramanessin Brook Holmdel, N.J.
  15. Hi! I would like to trade these Nerinea snails,they were found in Valjevo,Western Serbia. They are from the Jurassic period.If anyone is interested send PM! In return i would like to trade these for teeth mostly,but if not other fossils are possible too Kind regards, Darko
  16. Today I stopped to stretch my back and did about 10 minutes of collecting near Whites Creek, Tennessee- I believe that this might be Richmond Group Ordovician. I would be looking for a little help on some IDs, I believe @Peat Burns, @Herb And @Tidgy's Dad might be able to help out. Here are some of my finds- Brachiopods- Gastropods- Bryozoan- I believe that the smaller pieces are Constellatia Florida. Hash Plates-
  17. Hunting on a Bike

    A bit of a weird trip yesterday. I combined two hobbies at the same time. You may have seen me wondering what fossil hunting was like on a boat. So I tried the desert version of a canoe: a mountain bike. This is part of the ongoing research on Fossils of Stansbury Island that @Earth Chemistry is conducting there (See thread here). I packed my bike and back pack and drove to the southern tip of the island. We had these layers down before my trip. Red is no fossils, green is fossils.
  18. Shells from Carniol

    Hi all, Here are a gastropod and a bivalve that I found in Carniol, southeastern France this summer. They are from the "Gargasian", Aptian, Cretaceous. The pictures aren't fantastic, so if needed I can retake them. Thanks in advance, Max #1 A gastropod (surprisingly not a steinkern, but the shell itself!). Preservation is surprisingly good I find for something this old, especially taking into account the fact it's been replaced by pyrite!
  19. I have recently found a fossil of Conus seashell in Macedonia, in the region of Shtip, to be precise. I want to know what is the ID of this fossil. Can anyone help me to indentify it? Thanks in advance.
  20. This all started over a year ago. I was selected as Member of the Month and a couple of TFF members from Texas invited me down to the big state to collect. I primarily collect in my home region, the northeast, but I've taken fossil forays to New Mexico, Kentucky, and Germany and was willing to consider a trip to Texas and the opportunity to visit some classic fossil sites and collect fossils that are outside my usual focus. I began planning this about ten months ago, contacted potential fossil collecting partners and did my own research on fossil sites, geology, and the types of fossils I would likely encounter. I had never been to Texas let alone fossil collected there. From the Forum I knew there was a lot of great hunting. Then there was all of the logistics, what to stay, what to bring. Since I wanted to bring back a lot driving appeared to be my best option, but I hadn't driven that far solo in over thirty years. Timing of my trip; mid-late September, came right after my daughter went away to college and I was in the middle of moving to a new place. So things couldn't have been more hectic. Finally, early in the morning on September 8th I set out. Things went okay until I was in Kentucky. Just as it was turning nightfall, torrential rain hit, traffic was stopped on the interstate for two and a half hours, and the last two hours of the trip I struggled with wet conditions and poor visibility. I finally arrived at my parents' house just after one in the morning. The next day on my way over to my sister's I took a small detour and stopped at an outcrop I was well familiar with in Leitchfield, the Upper Mississippian Glen Dean Formation.
  21. So to be honest, my untrained eyes wouldn’t have known these were fossils had I not dug them up myself. They look just like regulars shells. Do y’all have any tips that’ll educate me a bit? I have more if you need better pictures I just grabbed a handful. Look at the ultra mini, isn’t he cute?!
  22. sorry again, i dont know what the species of these specimens are and also sorry for some reason parts of the photos were cropped and made smaller i think its because i put too much on there so they had to cut down the file size (:
  23. From the album Cretaceous

    Turritella sp. (gastropod) Ostrea falcata (oyster) Upper Cretaceous Wenonah Formation Mattawan Group Big Brook Colts Neck, N.J.
  24. From the album Middle Devonian

    Bivalves, a gastropod, a bryozoan (Fenestella sp.), and a brachiopod (Mediospirifer) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Route 209 road cut Wurtsboro, N.Y.
  25. Gastropods and little clams

    My eyes are crossing trying to ID these snails and such, and I'm getting mixed times so I can't be right on them. Any help would totally rock. 2 pics each of first three, 3 angles of the fourth and fifth (clams): top, bottom, and seam. I think I got all that right! Lol
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