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Found 270 results

  1. From the album Cretaceous

    Longochoncha sp. (formerly Rostellites) Gastropod internal cast almost two and a half inches long Upper Cretaceous Wenonah Formation Matawan Group Ramanessin Brook Holmdel, N.J.
  2. This weekend I visited again a late ordovicium site north of Oslo, as I now know is the katian period (that applies to the earlier posts on this website which I then, mistakenly, thought was middle ordovicium). First, for the first time I found two graptolites in a limestone, and first time in this site, I m not sure but I think it is graptolites, but it seems so. Next, I found this stone which, I believe, includes an Gompoceras Nautiloid (the brown in the middle) and some nice gastropods. The size of the Nautiloid is about 4,5 cm. And then this small gastropod presered in tre dimensions
  3. 20190526_224800.jpg

    From the album Kandeek

  4. NE Iowa Paleozoic

    I read a lot of fossil hunting reports on here, but I don’t post many. I think it’s primarily because it is usually many, many months after I have gone when I finally get everything cleaned up, ID’d and take photos, etc. It just seems too after the fact to me at that point, haha. But this time, due to a wonderful “tour guide” we had, I wanted to get something posted in a relatively timely fashion. Because of that, I haven’t had time to do a lot of research I need to do on specific ID’s but luckily I’m somewhat familiar with most of what we found to make at least an educated guess. I have seen numerous folks on here show some of their finds from the Ordovician and Devonian of Iowa and nearby states and it always looked intriguing to me as I have collected the Ordovician in the (relatively) nearby Cincinnati area and the Devonian in the Great Lakes area and Oklahoma. I wanted to see how the Iowa stuff compares. So my wife and I opted to take the long way home from Indiana to Texas and swing through Iowa (and on to South Dakota, but that was more for sight-seeing). I had done some research on sites to check out and contacted Mike @minnbuckeye to see if he could help me high grade my list. Being the absolute gentleman that he is, he did one better and offered to act as our tour guide for a day of collecting through the Ordovician! What a guy!! I can’t thank him enough for taking the time to do this. We had a great day and hit a bunch of nice spots, most of which I had not found on my own and certainly didn’t know some of the very important details of the sites. Many folks have said it in other trip reports and I can only add to the chorus of how valuable it is to go with someone that knows the area and how nice it is of TFF members such as @minnbuckeye to offer their time and energy to do it. Based on Mike’s recommendation, we spent our first day doing some collecting in the Devonian rocks of the Coralville, Iowa area. The first spot we could not access due to some current road construction but we made our way to the next one and spent several hours along the Iowa River/Coralville Lake collecting from the Coralville Formation of the Cedar Valley Group. You quickly learn how Coralville got its name as the rocks are a coral/bryozoan limestone. There are brachiopods and other fauna, but corals make up the bulk of the fossils at this site. And there were some very nice ones as you can see in the pictures below. Beautiful Hexagonaria, huge horn corals and others. We also went to the Devonian Fossil Gorge and a nearby state park, both of which have nice exposures of Devonian rocks with fossils, but no collecting. Here is a shot of the area, fossils litter the ground. This represents our total haul from this site The horn coral in here were abundant and quite large. Corals What I believe are Hexagoanaria corals. I think with a little cleaning, these will look really nice and I like the juxtaposition with the horn coral. Brachiopods and bryozoans A nice piece that was a little too big to take.
  5. North Sulphur River 9-25-20

    Here are some pictures from my latest trip to the NSR. Nothing special this trip but I was wondering what the last two pictures are of. Seems like a more recent fossil possible a tooth of a mammal?
  6. Back to the Ohio Valley

    Hi Everyone, I took a 2 week trip to the Ohio Valley, arriving back in New York about a week ago. It was primarily a family visit since many of my relatives now reside in the Elizabethtown, KY area. However, the Ohio Valley, as some of you know, is very rich in Paleozoic fossils and I just had to make a few stops on my way there and back as well as between family engagements. I will try to share enough to give you all a gist of it: It was a long day's drive from the northern suburbs of New York City to Richmond, Indiana where I spent the first night. The next day I was headed down State Road 101 to Garr Hill, to collect in the Upper Ordovician Liberty Formation. It was my first time at the site and everything I found was collected from loose rocks at or near the base of the outcrop. A couple of pictures:
  7. There are so many tens of thousands of fossils at the lakefront park that I never get bored, and sometimes one finds something new. Today we saw the first trilobite portion ever in this rock. There were also some colony creatures I didn't expect. 'Ordinary' finds were beautiful lamp shells, Pterotheca expansa, gastropods, and cephalopods including Beloitoceras.
  8. There are blocks of marl in the river and you have to go up and break them to find the fossils There are a lot of shells
  9. Wyoming Wonderland

    It has been 10 days since my trip to Wyoming came to a close. I have done a rough cleaning of my finds and will display some of them for you. To begin with, I had a continuing education class in Jackson. The scenery around the Tetons is truly breath taking. But I was eager to depart and begin a fossil hunting adventure with the 3 free days I had left. I love my bald eagles and found this photogenic pair as I departed town. My first stop was NE of Farson in an attempt to find some petrified palm wood. Here is the "road" which brought me to where I thought I should be. No petrified wood was found but I did put a few specimens in my bucket. I believe these are some algal structures??? They littered the butte that I was hunting on. This was not the start that I wanted, but just enjoying the openness of the Wyoming countryside made up for the lack of finds. I finished the day by taking in this sunset before departing. Tomorrow will be a new day and the fossil gods may be kinder, at least I hope. The next site is south of Wamsutter, and the hopeful finds will be "Turritella agate". This Green River Formation (Lamey Member) fresh water snail species is really Elimia tenera, not turritella. I must thank @jpc for directing me there without a hitch. This site appeared on google earth to be a hop, skip, and a jump from the gravel road. It is MANY MANY JUMPS!!! Had he not told me to continue until I saw these hills, I would have experienced my second failure. As you approach the hills, the road forks and the right fork takes you up on top giving you this view. UP top, Elimia are everywhere, for miles and miles!!! Every dark rock in this next photo' foreground contains them. An individual rock typical of what you see in the previous photo:
  10. Ardèche 2020: trip report

    So for the last two and a half weeks I’ve been camping in the Ardèche region in southern France. After a long, exhausting trip of 13 hours we finally arrived. We put up the tent, read a book and went to sleep so we would be fit for our first real day of our vacation. At the first day, we did visit the museum I showed in this topic: After that, the real work started. This big pile of rock was just dumped at the edge of the road. After a few minutes we found our first complete ammonite. Spot the ammonite The whole region is filled with these small piles of rocks, so as long as you just keep walking, you’ll find them… The region itself is beautiful too. Anyway, except two beautiful little ammonites, the first day didn’t really work out. The next day I walked a little further from the camping (like little as in 10km). Totally worth it! I found an amazing spot were marls eroded away and just left tiny ammonites. When I found them I immediately thought of an old topic by @Max-fossils who went to Carniol some time ago. At first, I thought it was identical, except this spot was a lot smaller, not as rich and with a couple of different species. I think I spent about 40 hours at this spot, and I think I found about 150 tiny ammonites, from at least 8-9 different species (but I’m far from an ammonite expert). I think these are lower Cretaceous, but I am not sure on a more precise date. How most of the place looks. Covered with tiny ammonites that resurface after heavy rains (which occurred three times during my stay, so I could keep searching at the same spot) The spot, kind a steep wall (me for scale). Anyways, time for some of the finds (my good camera broke down so I do this with my phone): I think these are Aconeceras nisus, the most common species.
  11. Name that fossil, part 2

    These are also from Mike's lost gift fossil collection, no location determined as of yet. Your ID will help me do that. I have many more of these. Seem to be all the same genera and species. They have the general form of periwinkles, but they are strangely spirally-beaded. (I understand there are beaded periwinkles), but I thought periwinkles were much smaller, like the specimen in the front, middle.
  12. Interesting assortment of fossils

    Last year while fossil hunting in a creek in Chenango Forks, New York I came across an interesting looking rock. The rock was primarily made up of gastropods with a few bivalves and brachiopods. It was a very crumbly, silty rock. I believe it is upper Devonian because I’ve only ever found upper Devonian rocks at that creek but I’ve been unable to find anything close to what I found in Karl A. Wilson’s Field Guide to the Devonian Fossils of New York
  13. Paleo Society of Austin had our first field trip since February. Spent four hours and found a smattering of good specimens. I already have a good variety from there so at this point I am looking for the odd species that has eluded me or better ones of what I already have. Found a few of each. One odd bit was this weird tooth crown I found on a tiny little spit of gravel. Photos are not great but maybe someone has a SWAG, or better, for me.
  14. From the album Middle Devonian

    Proematuraptropis ovatus Bellerophontoid Gastropod Middle Devonian Oatkacreek Formation Mottville Member Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Swamp Road Quarry Morrisville, N.Y.
  15. It was an all day outing on a perfect spring day in Central Upstate New York. Al Tahan and I visited a small private quarry where the Middle Devonian Oatkacreek Formation Mottville Member, part of the Marcellus Shale and the lower Hamilton Group is exposed. It's been about a year since I visited the site which I've been coming to for the past five years and it was Al's first visit. Erosion had broken down almost all of the pieces of shale which covered much of the site on previous visits. However a lot of fossils here, preserved in calcite are weathered free from the matrix and surface collecting can be very productive. This is by far the best site I've been to for the gastropod, Bembexia sulcomarginata. There were dozens strewn about the site. I couldn't resist picking up a few adding to my already extensive Bembexia collection. Brachiopods were also plentiful, especially the large spiriferid, Spinocyrtia granulosa (upper right). I couldn't help adding this inflated example to my large collection. Upper left is Mucrospirifer murcronatus, certainly one of the most abundant and distinctive Middle Devonian brachiopods in New York. Lower left is Protoleptostrophia perplana, a Strophomenid.
  16. Yesterday I was able to get out to Onondaga County in central NY. While I was there I got a chance to do some fossil hunting at two locations. The first was in Pompey Center, NY near Pratt’s Falls. The second location was a creek in Delphi Falls. The rock at both of these locations was the Skaneateles formation. I was able to get into a different formation at the second spot that was more shaly and had better preservation. This was my first time fossil hunting in the middle Devonian and I was amazed with the number of bivalves I found. (I’ve never found one in the lower Devonian near me). As well as bivalves I was able to find a few very well preserved gastropods, some brachiopods, a bunch of ostracods, and what I believe is a partial phyllocarid carapace.
  17. I have been photographing my collection of Pliocene gastropods from the Southeastern US, but I realize that I will never be able to completely picture every specimen within my collection. On a Facebook page about fossil crabs, @MB has been showing individual drawers within his collection. I like what he is doing so I thought I would do something similar here with drawers within my collection of fossil gastropods. My display collection is organized chronologically, the first seven drawers being Pleistocene. Since many of the formations within the southeast share species and I have limited room within my drawers, I display the two best specimens from any formation within the group so there should be no duplicates unless the same species from different formations demonstrate noticeable variation. Within my Pleistocene drawers, the following formations are represented: Upper Pleistocene Fort Thompson (Florida) Flanner Beach (North Carolina) Chibania (Middle) Bermont Formation (Florida) Calabrian (Lower) Caloosahatchee (Florida) Nashua (Florida) Waccamaw (North and South Carolina) James City (North Carolina) Gelasian (Lowest) Chowan River (North Carolina) Pleistocene Drawer 1 contains the Families Fissurellidae, Calliostomidae, Turbinidae, Epitoniidae, Eulimidae, Cerithiidae, Potamididae, Turrritellidae, and Vermetidae. Quarter for scale.
  18. POC, April 20th

    I made my first trip to Post Oak Creek today. There had been rain in the forecast for yesterday, so I hoped for some newly washed out fossils, but Sherman got no rain. So, I knew things would be pretty picked over, but I decided to go anyway, and just hike a bit further down the creek than I normally might, to see if I could find a few teeth anyway. I stayed about three hours. The knee pads I bought yesterday were definitely a good investment. These old fart eyes need to be close to the sand bars to get within reading glass distance of those small teeth. I had also made a sifter, and carried out half a bucket of sand to go through at home. I had fun. That creek is an amazing fossil place.
  19. From the album Cretaceous

    Gyrodes sp. Gastropod Internal Mold Upper Cretaceous Merchantville Formation Matawan Group Weller's Ravine Matawan, N.J.
  20. Lavernock finds

    Hello Was out fossil hunting at Lavernock this past week. It rained a lot so couldn't stay for very long. I never really take my phone on fossil hunts but will try to get some pictures of the surrounding area next time. Here are some of my favourite finds! 1. Jumble of ichthyosaur bones. 2. Ichthyosaur rib 3. Not really sure, probably ichthyosaur rib 4. Gastropod my sister found I tried prepping the ichthyosaur rib but it didn't go too well. At least its still intact.
  21. Dear Guys, During the last several years i detected unknown truth talking about Lithuanian boulders- the Carboniferous and Permian marine rocks are very numerous and their age is various- there can be found almost each stage of Carboniferous and Permian. The main rock types are three- dolomite and limestone with masses of brachiopods that is various in color, stromatolite limestone with mollusks and unidentified cephalon like fossils, and the last- lacustrine limestone with coelacanth scales and possible plant remains (Carboniferous rhabdodermatids are very numerous). Carboniferous period and Early- Middle Permian was not known in Lithuanian glacial boulders so I very need the strong expert, especially who works on Carboniferous- Permian brachiopods. If my age determinations are correct then I will write the scientific book about this discovery and i think there is huge possibility that many of these boulders could be transported by someone glaciation from Northwestern Russia (or Northern Ural) because there are big areas of Devonian, Carboniferous, Permian and Triassic rocks near surface and Northern mountains potentially could be the cold center at some glaciation period in the Pleistocene. I will show all the pictures with fossil identifications and size, maybe someone will tell the opinion about the taxon and age possibilities. Any contact detail or other important information is very welcome! First image- Angiospirifer (Late Carboniferous), 1.1 cm length Second image- Anthracospirifer (Middle- Late Carboniferous), 1.8 cm length third image- Archaeocidaridae sea urchin plates (Carboniferous), 5- 8 mm diameter Fourth image- unidentified brachiopod species from Carboniferous- Early Permian (8 mm- 1 cm length) Fifth image- Atomodesma? bivalves from Kungurian boulder with Waagenoconcha brachiopod (1.7- 2.3 cm length)
  22. I bought a new old cabinet last winter and spent several months filling it with newly labeled specimens, most of them now stored in jewelry boxes. I took photos of it to show Tim, Fossildude19 and he suggested I post them in the Members Collections section. I followed his suggestion. The collection started in 2011 with a few fossil purchases off a well known public auction site. By the early spring of 2012 I was collecting in the field and the vast majority of my collection was self collected in that manner from sites, primarily in the Northeast and Ohio Valley as well as ones collected on trips to Texas, Germany and out west. There are also some gift specimens that I own thanks to the generosity of a number of friends, most of whom are on the Forum. The top of the cabinet is occupied by miscellaneous specimens, some that wouldn't fit in the drawers, some slated to be in a glass display case I hope to eventually get, and my collection of fossils found in New Jersey just above the Iridium Layer.
  23. There are several hundreds of small to micro marine specimen in this one stone. There's complete bivalves, odd looking gastropods and things that I have no ideal as to what they are. I'm told the age of these specimen are most likely beyond two millions years old.
  24. Missouri ordovician

    Been playing in a new dirt bed. Full of rocks. Heres a purdy lecanospira stienkern with druzy.
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