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Found 205 results

  1. From the album Cretaceous

    Turritella sp. (gastropod) Ostrea falcata (oyster) Upper Cretaceous Wenonah Formation Mattawan Group Big Brook Colts Neck, N.J.
  2. From the album Middle Devonian

    Bivalves, a gastropod, a bryozoan (Fenestella sp.), and a brachiopod (Mediospirifer) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Route 209 road cut Wurtsboro, N.Y.
  3. Gastropods and little clams

    My eyes are crossing trying to ID these snails and such, and I'm getting mixed times so I can't be right on them. Any help would totally rock. 2 pics each of first three, 3 angles of the fourth and fifth (clams): top, bottom, and seam. I think I got all that right! Lol
  4. I found this in Ellsworth county kansas. I am very curious what it is and how it came to be. It looks to be wood with a layer of fossils.
  5. From the album Middle Devonian

    Gastropod Encrusted with Bryozoan Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Lebanon, N.Y.
  6. From the album Lower Devonian

    Diaphorostoma ventricosum (gastropods on matrix) Lower Devonian Kalkberg Formation Helderberg Group Interstate 88 road cut Schoharie, N.Y.
  7. From the album Middle Devonian

    gastropods: Glyptotomaria capillaria Palaeozygopleura hamiltoniae Retispira leda and various brachiopods Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Lebanon, N.Y.
  8. Hello everyone, I apologize for the delay in making my report, but my latest trip was delayed by an upper respiratory infection. I took this past week off from work, with plans to visit both Matoaka and Flag Ponds, but then the virus hit and so goes the best laid plans of mice and fossil hunters. By Thursday, after four days of long naps and lots of fluids, I decided I was well enough to make the hour and a half drive down. I also thought that some sunshine would do me good. The day was gorgeous, not the normal, swampy heat that my home state of Maryland is known for. We call it, 'the air that you wear.' Surprisingly, the crowd was small. for such a beautiful, sunny day. I arrived at the cliffs around noon. High tide was around 9:30 that day, so while I would have preferred to go earlier, I waited for the tide to roll out a bit. The waves were a bit stronger than I expected, so I am glad that I waited. It was not a day for teeth because I found nothing other than a few tiny lemon shark teeth. But after meeting Igotarock and seeing her report, I had shells on my brain more than teeth this time. Whodaman, I was not feeling up to going all the way up the beach to the second cliff, but I have been eyeing it up for weeks. It is on my list for a cooler day or maybe a day when I can get an earlier start. The material that fell down a few weeks ago at the first run of cliffs is still revealing gems. On my way to the fall, I made the mistake of slipping on the clay ridge at the base of the cliffs. I know that area is very slippery and I try to avoid it, but I stepped up on it for a minute because the sun had dried it fairly well so I thought I was safe and I wanted to look at a very large clam shell. On my way back to the sand, my feet both went out from under me at the same time. Fortunately my bum hit the sand and not the harder clay. I banged my left wrist up a bit and it was very sore last night, but no permanent damage. After sitting for a bit and making sure there was no real damage that would keep me from going on, I made my way to the fall, found some promising chunks and put them in a bucket that I had brought along with some bubble wrap. Tonight, I got out the toothbrush and the dental pick and revealed this,
  9. Shell Shocked at Matoaka

    Calvert Cliffs has been a popular place lately and I hesitated to post one more trip report this week, but as I look for other kinds of things, I decided I'd share. I have been told on several occasions that the cabins aren't worth much. All they have are shells. as @WhodamanHD put it, "If you like snails, go to Matoaka." Well, yes. That's why I love it so much. Last year I documented at 50 species of mollusk from one spot on the beach, and that's just what I was able to bring home! I returned to the for Independence Day week. and the cliffs did not disappoint! A landslide so recent that there was no sign yet of rain erosion stretched out into the bay just north of the beach. It's a treacherous place to linger and to traverse, but I was banking on the fact that this part off the cliff had done it's falling for now -- I hoped. In other spots, trees dangled precariously over the cliffs. If you ever doubted that this can fall on you, remember this -- I'm pretty sure that the sound of thunder I herd the night we got in was the landslide I worked all week. It only rumbled once, on a windless, rainless evening. The innumerable fallen trees I had to climb over to get to my favorite spot tell the rest of the ongoing story. If you feel a bit of gravel fall own your head, RUN. You were warned. That said, we all know this is an addiction, so I se too work with a screw driver most of the week, chipping away at the loose material at the base that was sitting in the nice, cool water most of the day. On a blisteringly hot day, there's no place I'd rather be! The fall exposed all kinds of things that most folks think I'm a bit silly to carve out - clams, snails, bryozoa, brachiopods, but I love the biodiversity of the place. I chipped away at big blocks during the day, until it got too hot, the tide too low and the snack supply diminished. I met the wonderfully astute @FossilsAnonymous out there and loved getting to talk to a fellow hunter who didn't think me crazy for chasing after punky sea shells. I wrapped everything in aluminum foil and carried them in a metal pail for the mile or so trek back to the cabin, where I had my make-shift lab set up on the porch. That's where the real work began. The day before we left was blustery after successive storm cells moved in and out the night before. The beach was totally rearranged from wave action. The bay spewed forth all kinds of things. My daughter and I walked the beach to find whatever had washed ashore. I found 3 Ecphora snails sitting on the beach right at the entrance. A little further down, we met another forum member, whose name I cannot find now in my tag options HI! We spoke for about 10 minutes while she and my daughter dove into the lapping waves to grab the shark teeth that washed up at our feet. How they saw them is beyond me, but they must have collected 30 between them while we were standing there! It's taken me a week since I got home to unwrap and clean most of what I brought home. It took me an entire afternoon of diving into half a dozen texts to identify the few shells that were new to me. One I can still only get down to a genus. (see comments!) So far, I've found at least 8 more species of mollusks to add to my count. My daughter brought home great gobs of shark teeth. We even brought back a few big bone shards, one of which I believe is a (rather rare for this section) dugong bone with scratches that might be a predator's bite marks. There is still a big blocks of matrix in the basement waiting to be carefully picked with the old dental and clay tools. There is still a pile of micro matrix to sift through that I carved out of the larger shells as I prepped them. It's been like opening gifts at Christmas. This Christmas may last for a couple very happy months!
  10. From the album Middle Devonian

    Naticonema lineata (Platyceratoid gastropod preserved in pyrite) Middle Devonian Lower Ludlowville Formation Ledyard Shale Hamilton Group Spring Creek Alden, N.Y.
  11. From the album Middle Devonian

    Palaeozygopleura hamiltoniae (gastropod in pyrite nodule) Middle Devonian Lower Ludlowville Formation Ledyard Shale Hamilton Group Spring Creek Alden, N.Y.
  12. Hi! My 8 y/o son and I are visiting Nashville, TN to look for fossils. We found lots of brachyopods today. Where should we look for Trilobites and Gastropods? I’ve read some posts, but it’s hard to pinpoint specific areas. Any tips?
  13. French Miocene shells

    Hi all, Here are 11 different shells, bivalves and gastropods, that I would like to be able to ID down to species level. I got them in a little bag full of these little shells, . I have a decent idea of the genus of most, but I'm lost as to when it comes to species. The shells are all from Ferriere-Larcon, Loire, France. It says on the label that they are from the "Falun de Pontelivien" ("falun" translates to "shelly", as in "shelly layer", referring to the main components of the layer: fossil shells), and that they are from the Serravallian stage of the Miocene (approx 12 mya). These are just 11 of the different species, from about an estimate of 40 different ones. These are the ones I am most interested in IDing for now. But, if you maybe have a document or so with a list or plates of all the possible species from this location/formation, that would be even better! In case better pictures are needed, let me know. Thanks in advance for the help, Max #1: Cardita sp (species... ?)
  14. Devonian Interuptus

    Hi, Monday I visited a new site highly recommended by another TFF member. It was a roadcut on an interstate highway near Schoharie, NY. The roadcut exposed what I believe (based on fauna and preservation) the Lower Devonian Kalkberg Formation, part of the Helderberg Group (410 million years old). The day was gorgeous. Temp was in the low 70s. Fossils were plentiful in particular layers and the preservation was often excellent. Many were found loose from the matrix lying in the rubble. As with other exposures of the Kalkberg in Schoharie County, the biodiversity was awesome. I collected for two and a half hours, exploring only about half of the exposure when a state trooper pulled up and informed me that this highway allowed emergency stopping only and recommended I move along. I had time to gather all of my finds and my tools. I am a bit sad knowing I can't return to this very productive site and that there were likely more magnificent specimens still sitting there waiting to be picked up. However, I'm glad that I had the opportunity to collect there once. Here is an overview of my finds and a pair of Diaphorostoma ventricosum gastropods on matrix.
  15. Natlandite Fossil Stone

    I joined with the hopes that someone here may know more about Natlandite fossil stone. My wife inherited a polished three piece set and unfortunately there is very little information available about it online. Within the two articles I could find we have learned that "it was first discovered in 1954 in Los Angeles, Ca. by geologist Manley L. Natland, during a small dig he made in his offices backyard. He was given a rock brought up during soil testing for an annex to the old Atlantic Richfield Building at 6th and Flower streets. Natland estimated the fossil stone to be between 5 to 7 million years old and said that it was likely formed when an earthquake dislodged a great mass of sludge from the Los Feliz area (then the seashore) and moved it to the Arco site, where it solidified. He had it cut and polished, revealing shells of bivalves, gastropods and coral in a marble like material, but thought no more about it until 1969, after he had retired from Atlantic Richfield, now Arco. That year, he asked to examine the excavation site where the building and it's annex were being torn down to make way for Arco towers, now known as City National Plaza. What he found was an entire bed of the fossil stone that he had seen years earlier. Natland arranged to have 500 tons of it hauled away and eventually had the rock cut and shaped into tables and statuary. The rock is about as hard as quartz and it contains about 350 different species. It was also named the official gemstone of Los Angeles in 1981." I have spoken with a paleontologist here at our local museum of natural history and he stated that he believes that some record of the stones should be preserved in a museum, if that has not already happened. He gave me the contact information of a paleontologist at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History and suggested that I contact them, as they would be the most appropriate place to store such fossils. They are absolutely beautiful pieces and any info or suggestions will be greatly appreciated! Thank you so much for taking time to read my post. Brandon Massey
  16. Managed to get out to a site I haven’t been to before, and found lots of cephalopods and gastropods. I recently got back into geocaching (my husband and I used to geocache as students about 10 years ago, back when you had to use a handheld gps unit. Now you can just use a smartphone.) Anyways, we didn’t collect at this location, since the geocache makes it an excellent learning resource for people who don’t know much about fossils. A few photos attached.
  17. About a month ago, I headed out on two fossil trips to the well-known St. Leon roadcut in Indiana. I was hunting in the Liberty formation (late Ordovician) with the sole goal of finding some nice trilobites (which I definitely achieved!). Along with multiple rare trilobites, I was able to find some excellent examples of other fossils. The spoils were totally awesome, and I am itching to go back. I hope you enjoy. Best for last.
  18. Bunch of micro-mollusks

    Hi all, A handful of days ago there was a sand pile right in my neighborhood. Not sure why it was there, probably someone was making constructions to their house, but in any case I was happy. That's because that kind of sand comes straight from the North Sea, which is full of Eemian fossil sediments! So I took a little plastic bag and spent an hour or two looking in that pile of sand for fossils. The very common Eemian bivalves came up abundantly (so species like Mactra plistoneerlandica, Cerastoderma edule, C. glaucum, Macoma balthica, etc), but that is not what I was too excited about. Seeing that the sand pile was rather small, it forced me to focus on just that little pile. Which is great, because therefore I actually started looking much more closely, and hereby also collecting tiny micro-fossils! Lots of gastropods, which is awesome because these are not as common as bivalves in these sediments. I namely found a complete yet puny Anomia ephippium, some very small Cerastoderma's, and also the ones attached. I would love to be able to bring these down to species level. So I am asking for your help! The Hague, Netherlands (from North Sea sediments) Eem Formation Eemian, Pleistocene; 120'000 y Thanks in advance, Max #1: Looks a little bit like Macoma balthica, but still a bit different... Very likely from the Tellinidae
  19. From the album Cretaceous

    Cerithium sp. (partial gastropod internal mold) Upper Cretaceous Wenonah Formation Mattawan Group Big Brook Colt's Neck, New Jersey
  20. From the album Cretaceous

    Turritella merchantvillensis (gastropod internal mold) Upper Cretaceous Merchantville Formation Mattawan Group Mattawan, New Jersey A gift from Ralph Johnson
  21. Last hunt in the miocene of the south of France. A prospecting was necessary to find an old outcrop.
  22. Another local spot

    Hi Everyone, Now that RL is back to some measure of stability I'm exploring. Pa recently reworked an unstable road cut here in Blair county and some interesting material has weathered from the very soft Ridegely Member at the top of the Old Port Formation [Devonian]. With spring coming late I've located several other exposures of this layer and am excited because it is so easy to work (get the sandstone matrix wet and you can rub it off with your fingers!) I posted some unknowns over in the ID Help Section.
  23. Toronto creek and river finds

    Hello there! I'm still in the process of deciding which fossils to put in my new display cabinets, so I'm looking for some identification help, if possible. All of the items pictured were found in the Toronto area (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) along creeks or rivers - please help me identify them if you can! Thanks in advance! Monica Picture #1: A trace fossil, but of what? Someone suggested trilobite tracks, but I don't know - what do you think? Perhaps @piranha can have a look... Picture #2: This may or may not be a trace fossil - I only just noticed it today. It vaguely resembles trilobite tracks to me (cruziana), but I'm definitely not sure...
  24. Three Gastropods- I would like ID confirmation. I THINK the first one (photo #1 & 2) is Astarte Concentrica. The SECOND bivalve I have no idea; I cannot find a match. (Photo 2 & 3) The THIRD one (photo5 & 6) I believe is Busycon carica.
  25. Upper Pennsylvanian Possible Burrow

    I found this a couple of years ago and have periodically taken it out to examine it as I've found the accumulation of fauna adhering to it's surface as very interesting. For awhile I affectionately referred to it as an accretion (as opposed to a concretion), envisioning a clump of mud rolling around in the wave action of a shoreline picking up bits of dead fauna. But now, with the fairly recent posts that have come up about crustacean burrows, I'm second guessing. On the exterior of this piece are brachiopod shell bits and molds, possible pectinid shell molds, crinoid columnals, and tiny gastropod steinkerns and exterior molds with decoration. The dark clumps appear to be pyrite. There are two depression areas, one on the large end, and a smaller one that is offset of the smaller end. These I speculate to be the exposed chamber, should this be a burrow. Notably within these depressions are oval shaped pellets and an interesting fibrous texture. So, I now defer to your opinions! Thank you for looking!
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