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Found 72 results

  1. St. Marys river 11-11-18

    Did some blackwater diving in the St. Marys river this past weekend. The biggest Meg tooth was a hair under 6” and also found a nice little benedini!
  2. ID help

    What are these ? Driving me nuts searched for hours online
  3. Few Fossils In Chert

    Not sure of identification., but a little nice. South central Georgia, the oldest deposits in this area indicate 35 mya and younger. The longest point across flat scale = 3.75cm Rodney
  4. Well I did not have much luck opening Mazon Creek concretions today, so I figured that I would try something about 190 Million years older, so tonight I was whacking Conasauga shale matrix from Murray County, Georgia, looking for Cambrian Aphelaspis brachyphasis trilobites. I did not go through much matrix tonight, but I did find a few trilobites, but the ones that I found do not represent the quality of trilobites that come from that location. As I continue to go through this matrix, I guarantee that I will find some pretty specimens and I will post my finds. Here is what I found tonight-
  5. Hi everyone, I found this in January of 2017 on Shark tooth island on the Savannah River in Georgia. Always have been curious what it is. The area has dredged material and contains fossils from the Miocene, Pliocene, and Pleistocene. It is slightly conical and symmetrical, uniform, and ovalish in cross section - straight in profile with no discernible curvature. In profile, one side is smoother and striated, the other coarser, dimpled, with elevated black speckles. It is not porous inside like other bones from the area. It appears to have schreger lines. I'm not sure if it is some sort of tusk, but I havn't seen other tusks without some degree of curvature. Overcast day here in Seattle. If photos aren't clear enough I'll upload some others on a sunny day. Thanks!
  6. This is a recent find on a sandbar where I find land and sea fossils. Reminds me of a human fibula, but I really have no idea. I also found 3 turkey verts, sea turtle fragments and shark teeth on the same day. This looks like it will be easily identifiable, but can provide more info if needed. Thank you for any help you can give me. Holocene- Silver Bluff Back Barrier Complex: Georgia Coast near Savannah
  7. Fossil Snail

    Any thoughts or species for this fossil snail that I found in south central Ga, I think the deposits in this area are 35 million years and younger. This snail was busted out of a void or crack in a larger rock.
  8. Roadtrip from NC to GA

    Hey! I might be going on a road trip, from the coast of NC to the Georgia mountains, in search of trilobites. Below is a pic of the fastest way to get there. I'm wondering if anyone could point out fossil spots around the where the Tennesee, Georgia and North Carolina border is as well as any along the rest of the route. Of course this route is not set in stone and I could move it around to accommodate fossil spots. Thanks, Tyler
  9. Trip to GA for Agatized Coral!

    Hey folks! You may have seen Cris's video of our Agatized Coral hunt recently (I was a little behind on editing!). But here is my take on it, and my finds! We don't always get to head up to GA to hunt for coral, so this was a very nice change of pace. We found some really killer pieces!
  10. Diving the St Marys River

    Dove the St Marys river Sunday with Subpay charters and had a productive day finding lots of megs, makos, great white, mammoth and whale teeth!
  11. New fossil hunter - need help

    So I am very new to this and honestly I don’t know any of the fancy terms or much about it in general. So any help would be appreciated. This is my first find other than lots of shark teeth
  12. Basilosauridae partial vertebrae

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Side view of vertebra, displaying missing piece see 1st picture for information
  13. Basilosauridae partial vertebrae

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    View of damaged surface see 1st picture for information
  14. Basilosauridae partial vertebrae

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Vertebrae damaged during or before fossilization, from a basilosauridae. Found in Albany, GA, in the Ocala limestone formation, an Eocene deposit laid down by the swannee current between about 34-56 mya. The exact species is possibly still up in the air, since it is been suggested that it is something other than the original ID. We're still looking into the possibilities. Found in Georgia, so that limits the possibilities, but still leaves open a number of basilosauridae, including some dorudontinae such as Zygorhiza. Zygorhiza, which is what it was originally supposed to be, is iffy since it hasn't officially ever been found in GA, but I don't think that means it hasn't, doesn't that just mean it hasn't been found by scientific authorities, or confirmed by such? it seems however, that the person who ID'd it as Zygorhiza was Professor Mark Uhen, who I guess is an authority on the subject, but as before, they're not supposed to be found in GA. Another possibility from a different authority on the subject has ID'd it as Cynthiacetus, which I personally would prefer, but sadly that doesn't have any impact in the matter:(
  15. Hello, I have been a long time member of the fossil forum, but I have never posted before. I live in south Florida and I am planning on making a trip up to northwestern Georgia, northeastern Alabama, and southeastern Tennessee for two or three days and I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions on fossil hunting sites in the region. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated.
  16. Schwimmer, D.R., 2002. Giant fossil coelacanths from the Late Cretaceous of the eastern USA. Fernbank Magazine. Faculty Bibliography. 514. http://csuepress.columbusstate.edu/bibliography_faculty/514 The paper is: Schwimmer, D.R., J.D. Stewart & G.D. Williams. Giant fossil coelacanths of the Late Cretaceous in the Eastern United States. Geology 22: 503-506. Nouv. Ser. 139: 187-190. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/252272908_Giant_fossil_coelacanths_of_the_Late_Cretaceous_in_the_eastern_United_States https://www.researchgate.net/profile/David_Schwimmer https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Joe_Stewart5 Yours, Paul H.
  17. I'm preparing a teacher education workshop which includes a fossil hunting and identification activity. The teachers are coming from many states across the country. I'd like to include some suggestions of sites where they could replicate the things they learn and experience during the workshop with their students in the vicinity of their respective schools. I have the Indiana schools covered. For the ones near Dallas, I'm thinking Mineral Wells Fossil Park (and maybe Ladonia for older, more adventuresome students). The ones I need help with are sites within field trip range of the following: Austin, TX ( @Uncle Siphuncle, @KimTexan, @BobWill, @erose)? Atlanta, GA Golden, CO Palm Bay, FL (near Melbourne) Naples, FL (any shell dump piles accessible to and suitable for k-12?) @digit ? Bentonville, AR Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated, either posted here or via PM. I have alternative activity suggestions for them (e.g. bags of matrix to sift, etc) if they can't do a field trip, but there's nothing quite like the experience of hunting and discovery in the field... I would have done backflips if my grade school had had a fossil trip...
  18. Three root tooth - Help with ID

    I found this teeth on a beach in the Savannah River. I have to specimens both broken but I believe there the same species. Both have the what it appears to be a three root base. Specimen A Any input its appreciated! Thanks!!
  19. Fossil ID mammal teeth?

    Found this three on the savannah river near Tybee Island. A I think might be a capybara tooth? B I have no idea! C Maybe dolphin? It has a curvness where I think another tooth created some wear. Any help is appreciated! Thanks!!
  20. Ivory / tip of tusk? Help ID

    Hi! I found this ivory piece I would like some help... Its has a rounded tip so I figure it might be a type of tusk tip? I know ivory grows on ring like formations but this piece is almost flat like more of a oval. And its so polish on the outer layer. I found it in a beach near Tybee Island in the Savannah River. Any help is apprecieated!!! Thanks in advance
  21. Hi all I can see an optical illusion when looking at these trilobite photographs but you will need to come back to the post a couple of time for it to work. So is it positive or negative?
  22. Hi all, I have a mysterious croc tooth that needs identifying. It measures 7cm in a straight line, with a crown length of 3cm. It was found in a backwater near Savannah, Georgia. It came out of an old stream bed eroding out. The area is normally a Miocene deposit where there are Gavialosuchus americanus but the original owner (who is a fossil croc expert) sincerely believes it's something else as there are supposedly earlier deposits there as well. He thinks it is from the lineage of Deinosuchus. Has anyone seen such croc/alligator teeth in Georgia? Has anyone heard of late Cretaceous deposits near Savannah? Thank you.
  23. Cambrian Trilobite Verification

    A Fossil Forum friend sent me a few Georgia rocks to split. They were full of trilobites and bits. I believe these are all Aphelaspis brachyphasis but I understand this site has other species as seen in this information : Locality 1 is an outcrop in Murray County. The matrix is mudstone and the researchers report “very abundant specimens” of Aphelaspis brachyphasis often as body clusters. Locality 1, Murray County: Agnostus inexpectans Aspidagnostus rugosus Glyptagnostus reticulatus Aphelaspis brachyphasis ; Could any knowledgeable person verify the identities of these trilobites. As I said , it seems like they are all A. brachyphasis but the HUGE size differences to the trilobites leave me wondering whether I am missing something. Thanks.
  24. East Coast fossil road trip

    Hello! Later this year I'm planning on moving from Florida back to New England. I was hoping to make the voyage into an interesting road trip... I've heard of several places in the Eastern half of the US where you can dig your own fossils. I know that there are some places in Georgia and the Carolinas that are good to find Megalodon teeth, and some places in the northern US that are good for finding trilobites... I'm up for anything interesting and was looking for suggestions on exact places, tour companies, people, anything that you can offer that might extend my collection on the trip!
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