Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'georgian bay formation'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 94 results

  1. Wonderfully detailed colony animal

    I had a disappointing outing to Joshua Creek looking for lamp shells on the weekend. When I got home, I saw one of the rocks had a wonderfully detailed critter on the side...I was very pleased. I suppose it is some kind of encrusting bryozoan. Most that I find are branching types with smooth surfaces and little evidence of the apertures for living inhabitants.
  2. Wowowow I was very surprised to find all this amazing stuff today at my favourite river bank fossils spot of the Etobicoke creek. I managed to snag a whole lot of stuff today, some Orthoconic Nautiloids, Brachipods and what I believe to be the nicest tentaculite I've ever seen!!! The fossils are from the Georgian Bay Formation and they were found in the broken up "rock fields" next to the creek. This is going to be one of my longer posts, so I will have to split them up into section. The full haul, with the typical estwing 22 ounce rock pick (33 cm from bottom of the handle to the top of the hammer end for anyone who doesn't own one). First lets start with the usual: Them cone boys, aka Orthoconic Nautiloids. I believe all of the following to be Treptoceras crebriseptum.
  3. Help in ID of unusual shaped fossil

    Hello, I recently cracked open a rock to find one the most pristine and unusually shaped fossils I've seen in a looong time. I predict it might be the edge of a bivalve shell poking out, but I wanted to know what others might have to say about this. It was found in the rock deposits of the rivers in Toronto, Canada, and is part of the Georgian bay formation. Also, only the bottom half seems to be completely crystallized and is translucent, whereas the top is relatively opaque: I am somewhat worried about totally ruining the fossil if I try to further crack into the matrix, as it is Ordovician era rock which is very hard and often results in the destruction of the specimen when trying to clean up the fossils. Sorry for not providing much to go off of . Thanks in advanced for the help! -Em
  4. Hello to all! Its been a very long time since I've been on here, but my recent trips around the creeks in Toronto, Canada (in the Etobicoke area) have yielded some of my largest and most defined finds of all time, here are some of the nicest Orthoconic Nautiloids I had found yet: Probably the nicest one in my collection at this moment, found almost completely by fluke when I hit a rock with my pick and this bad boy showed up Imprint made by the previous one These last couple would be way nicer, if only I could find a way to get it out of the rock matrix without completely destroying the specimen :/ ... Anyways, it good to be back and hunting this summer after a somewhat stressful finals season. I also have wayyyyyy more stuff that I found such as some unusually large and defined bivalves and tentaculites (maybe?), but I might save those for another time as they definitely weren't as cool as these ones. All were found along river rock deposits In the west side of Toronto (Etobicoke, Humber and Mimico creek) - Georgian Bay formation, excavated using rock pick and chisel.
  5. Favistina calicina

    From the album Credit River Fossils from Streetsville, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Member)

    Favistina calicina (AKA Favistella alveolata) (Nicholson, 1875). Late Ordovician, Katian. Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Member. Credit River, Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. Found as a loose specimen on an exposure along the Credit River. Set on fossiliferous limestone.
  6. Treptoceras crebiseptum

    From the album Urban Fossils of Toronto (Georgian Bay Formation, Lower Member)

    The smallest complete Treptoceras crebiseptum specimen in my collection. It even has the body chamber. Length is 10 cm long. Found in the shales of the Georgian Bay formation, Lower Member at Mimico Creek in Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada. Late Ordovician.
  7. Ichnofossil Association

    From the album Urban Fossils of Toronto (Georgian Bay Formation, Lower Member)

    Ichnofossil association collected somewhere along the Humber River. Georgian Bay formation, Lower Member. Late Ordovician. Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada.
  8. Hello there! I took advantage of the nice weather we've been having to visit Mimico Creek in Toronto, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) yesterday afternoon. Here are some photos of specimens that I'd like help identifying - perhaps @Tidgy's Dad would like to have a look? Firstly - the whole rock which contains the bryozoans and the unknown black objects: Specimen #1: a nice branching bryozoan - perhaps Homotrypa? Specimen #2: a nice encrusting bryozoan (there are actually two of them) - perhaps Mesotrypa? More to come...
  9. scolecodont or conodont?

    Hi again! Over the weekend, I posted pictures of small fossils in a rock I found at Mimico Creek in Toronto, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician). I've created this new post just for the shiny black specimens that I found in the rock because a consensus wasn't reached regarding their identity. Each of the two specimens pictured below are 5mm long. My question is: are these items scolecodonts or conodonts? I was leaning towards scolecodonts but I wanted to see what others have to say... Thanks once again! Monica
  10. Hi all! I ventured out to Mimico Creek in Toronto, Ontario today to look for fossils. It was very cold and the rocks were frozen together, but I managed to pry out one large rock that has some interesting fossils on it. The fossils are from the Georgian Bay Formation (Upper Ordovician). The rock caught my eye because I could spot a few Cornulites flexuosus on one side, but after I brought it home and washed it, I was pleasantly surprised to find that the other side had even more interesting items on it! I'm not exactly sure of what I'm looking at, though, so I'm asking for your help. I'll tag @FossilDAWG since he's quite knowledgeable about fossils in my area Firstly, here's the whole rock so you can get an idea of the size of the fossils within the rock (i.e. they're generally quite small): Now on to the fossils! Here are some shiny black items that I've never seen before, but they look like scolecodont Oenonites sp. - what do you think? (I only circled the items that look sharp enough to be identified - the other black items I'm very not sure about!) Here are a couple of long, thin, and delicate-looking crinoid stems - can they be identified at all? Perhaps something like Ectenocrinus simplex (which does occur in the Georgian Bay Formation)? (The second one is located between the branching bryozoans which I think may be the bryozoan Homotrypa sp.) More to come...
  11. Hello there! Last month, I visited the Credit River in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) to look for some fossilized corals. In addition to a bunch of weathered colonial rugose corals, I found an item that I think is something, but I'm not sure what - perhaps a sponge? Here are some photos of it: Side view - dry: Top view - dry: Top view - wet: Thanks so much! Monica
  12. I found this in ordovician strata that is approximately 450 million years old. It looks like a shell fragment from a bivalve or brachiopod, but it has rounded edges. Any help would be appreciated.
  13. Isotelus Pygdium

    From the album Finds From the Ordovician -488 to 443 MYA-

    From the Georgian Bay Formation
  14. A trip to Etobicoke Creek

    Yesterday I visited Etobicoke creek (west end of Toronto) which exposes the ordovician Georgian Bay formation. The creek was abundant with trace fossils and plates of preserved ripples, as well as small orthocone nautiloids.
  15. Graptolite from Mimico Creek?

    Hello there! Well, I tried to take Viola out for a little fossil hunt by Mimico Creek in Etobicoke, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) this afternoon because when I checked the forecast this morning it looked like it was going to be ideal fossil-hunting weather - a mix of sun and cloud with temperatures in the mid-20s Celsius. When we arrived, however, it began to rain - we toughed it out and came away with one piece before it began to pour and we called it a day. I was disappointed since I was hoping to spend a few hours there, but the one piece we took home looks like it might have a graptolite on it, which is quite exciting since I have yet to find one in my local haunts. Please check out the photo below and let me know what you think: Thanks in advance for your help! Monica
  16. If I had 2 weeks of vacation, I still wouldn't be able to catch up with cleaning, identifying, sketching, photographing, and organizing the recent minor finds.
  17. Hello there! I was inspired by @markjw to check out the Credit River here in Mississauga, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) because where I normally hunt there are typically no corals and I'd love to add a couple to my collection. Consequently, I went out for about an hour this morning before the family got up in order to try my luck, and I'm happy to say that I was successful!!! Based on information provided by @FossilDAWG in other threads here on TFF, I think all of my colonial rugose corals are Favistina calcina - here are photos of three of my specimens: Specimen #1 - side view: Specimen #2 - top and bottom views: Specimen #3 - top and bottom views: more to come...
  18. Hello everyone! On Monday, I found a beautiful Treptoceras crebriseptum orthoconic nautiloid in a huge rock at Mimico Creek in the Etobicoke/Toronto area (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician). It has been suggested that I might have a complete specimen, so I was hoping that someone out there might be able to let me know if this is the case or not. Here are some pictures... Whole specimen: Close-up of the base of the specimen (specimen has been turned over) - note that it is smoothly rounded and shows no septa - is this the fossilized living chamber of the animal? Close up of the tip of the specimen - note that it seems to end before the rock edge - is this the very tip of the animal? Close up of the piece that shattered off the tip of the specimen - note that it also seems to end before the rock edge: Thanks for your help!!! Monica
  19. Hi everyone!!! I had the afternoon to myself today because William and Viola are at day camps this week and my husband was busy, so I decided to check out Mimico Creek (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) by myself for a couple of hours. I didn't make many finds, but the finds I did make were super-amazing (by my standards, anyway ). As I was walking along the creek when I first arrived, I was checking out the wall of rock when I noticed a pattern: After gently prying out the rock, this is what I found: Hooray!!!!!!!!!! My first Flexicalymene granulosa!!!!!!!!!! For those of you who have read my trip reports and ID requests in the past, especially when I first started fossil-hunting in 2016, I always went out hoping to find a trilobite, and today I succeeded!!!!!!!!!! I then spent about an hour mucking about, not finding much, when I decided to hammer a big slab of rock that had some worn bivalves on the surface. Lo and behold, hidden underneath that layer of rock was the most beautiful Treptoceras crebriseptum orthoconic nautiloid that I had ever seen!!!!!!!!!! The bottom part of the fossil doesn't appear to have septal divisions, and it's a little flatter than the rest of the fossil - could it be the living chamber?!?!?! I cannot believe my luck today - this has been my best day of fossil-hunting in the Toronto area in the past 3 years!!!!!!!!!! I'm so excited!!!!!!!!!! I do have to play it cool at home, though - I don't want Viola to be disappointed that she missed out (I haven't yet told her what I did today - it'll be a secret for a while). @JUAN EMMANUEL @Wrangellian @Ludwigia @Malcolmt - I thought you might like to see
  20. Hi all! Yesterday afternoon I visited my local haunt (Etobicoke Creek, Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) with the kids, and I found a few items that I'd like to show you: Item #1: long crinoid stem - any ideas as to its identity? Item #2: big piece with ichnofossils - item circled in yellow is ichnofossil "a" and item circled in orange is ichnofossil "b" Item #2a: ichnofossil "a" top view Item #2: ichnofossil "b" top view Item #2: ichnofossil "b" side view Item #3 top: two views of a mineral stain that has the shape of a hyolith - what do you think? Item #3 bottom: crinoid columnal impressions (I think!) so it is fossiliferous rock (I think!) so perhaps the specimen above could've been a hyolith??? Thanks as usual for your help! Monica
  21. Predation Marks on Hebertella?

    Hi guys so I have this Hebertella occidentalis specimen I collected yesterday from the Credit River at Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario, which belongs to the Upper Member of the Georgian Bay Formation. Do these look like predation marks? There are also what appears to some crystallized grains inside these marks and I think they could be some sort of calcite. Sorry for the noisy grain of the image, but I hope this will help.
  22. Yesterday the weather in my area hit above the 20 degrees Celsius so I dared myself to go to Streetsville in Mississauga to visit a fossil site I have not been to in 2 years. I now live in Hamilton, Ontario so travelling to Streetsville was intimidating for me using public transit from Hamilton to Streetsville. I have not been to Streetsville by the Credit River ever since I moved from Etobicoke to Hamilton, Ontario and I miss collecting in this vicinity. But I made it. :)) I took pics of exposure sites as these sites are mentioned in one of the literatures describing the Georgian Bay formation. This site exposes the Georgian Bay formation, Upper Member.
  23. Hello guys. I’ve got 2 Late Ordovician reef fossils from Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada that I’d like to trade away to make room now that the fossil hunting season is coming back soon. I am trading away the specimens below. These are very nice specimens and comes from an exposure out of access to the ordinary public. Both belong to the Upper Member of the Georgian Bay Formation. Favistina calicina: Stromatocerium huronense:
  24. Hello again! The weather was warmer today, and since I had the kids to myself all afternoon while my husband went to see a movie with a friend, I decided to take the kids out once again. We first tried to do some collecting at Mimico Creek but were unable to because (1) the water was running too high, and (2) they've been doing some construction work around there which prevents us from getting close to our hunting spot. So the kids played at a nearby park for a while, and when I suggested that we check out Etobicoke Creek again, they were all for it (even William!). There was no ice this time, thank goodness, and what follows are just a few pictures of what I found - enjoy! I hope you're all having a wonderful holiday! Monica Orthoconic nautiloid (Treptoceras crebriseptum) chunk: Bivalve (Ambonychia radiata): Brachiopod (Sowerbyella sericea) positive and negative - the positive is just under 2cm long at the hinge line while the negative is just over 2cm at the hinge line (I'll tag @Tidgy's Dad just because I know how much he loves brachiopods ): Viola showing off one of her finds (another T. crebriseptum) with William joining in on the photo:
×