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Found 224 results

  1. Medusaster rhenanus Stuertz, 1890

    From the album Invertebrates

    Medusaster rhenanus Stuertz, 1890 Lower Devonian Lower Emsian Bundenbach Germany
  2. Ichthyosaur rib

    From the album Holzmaden

    A tiny 10 cm long Ichthyosaur rib from the lower Jurassic of the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden. At first you could only see the cross section. The prep work took about 2 hours (I was slow ) One more picture:
  3. Ichthyosaur tooth

    From the album Holzmaden

    A 1.4 cm long Ichthyosaur tooth from the lower Jurassic from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Germany). Some more pictures:
  4. Hunter, A.W., Mitchell, E.G., Casenove, D. and Mayers, C., 2019. Reconstructing the ecology of a Jurassic pseudoplanktonic megaraft colony. bioRxiv, p.566844. https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/566844v1.abstract https://www.biorxiv.org/content/biorxiv/early/2019/03/04/566844.full.pdf Hess, H. 2011, Treatise Online, no. 16, Part T, Revised, Volume 1, Chapter 19: Paleoecology of pelagic crinoids https://www.researchgate.net/publication/272640982_Treatise_Online_no_16_Part_T_Revised_Volume_1_Chapter_19_Paleoecology_of_pelagic_crinoids Other papers are: Röhl, H.J., Schmid-Röhl, A., Oschmann, W., Frimmel, A. and Schwark, L., 2001. The Posidonia Shale (Lower Toarcian) of SW-Germany: an oxygen-depleted ecosystem controlled by sea level and palaeoclimate. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 165(1-2), pp.27-52. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/229329097_Erratum_to_The_Posidonia_Shale_Lower_Toarcian_of_SW-Germany_an_oxygen-depleted_ecosystem_controlled_by_sea_level_and_palaeoclimate https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Annette_Schmid-Roehl Schmid-Röhl, A., Röhl, H.J., Oschmann, W., Frimmel, A. and Schwark, L., 2002. Palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of Lower Toarcian epicontinental black shales (Posidonia Shale, SW Germany): global versus regional control. Geobios, 35(1), pp.13-20. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/251729450_Palaeoenvironmental_reconstruction_of_Lower_Toarcian_epicontinental_black_shales_Posidonia_Shale_SW_Germany_Global_versus_regional_control https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Annette_Schmid-Roehl Yours, Paul H.
  5. Archaeopteryx gets company

    A non-archaeopterygid avialan theropod from the Late Jurassic of southern Germany Exciting news from Munich and the famous Solnhofen area Everybody is familiar with Archaeopteryx, but according to a new paper published by the University in Munich, it had a brother who lived at the same time in the same area: Alcmonavis poeschli The Late Jurassic ‘Solnhofen Limestones’ are famous for their exceptionally preserved fossils, including the urvogel Archaeopteryx, which has played a pivotal role in the discussion of bird origins. Here we describe a new, non-archaeopterygid avialan from the Lower Tithonian Mörnsheim Formation of the Solnhofen Archipelago, Alcmonavis poeschli gen. et sp. nov. Represented by a right wing, Alcmonavis shows several derived characters, including a pronounced attachment for the pectoralis muscle, a pronounced tuberculum bicipitale radii, and a robust second manual digit, indicating that it is a more derived avialan than Archaeopteryx. Several modifications, especially in muscle attachments of muscles that in modern birds are related to the downstroke of the wing, indicate an increased adaptation of the forelimb for active flapping flight in the early evolution of birds. This discovery indicates higher avialan diversity in the Late Jurassic than previously recognized. Scientific paper (in English, no paywall) CLICK News from the LMU University in Munich (in German) CLICK
  6. Unknown Ammonite ID

    Hi there guys. I received this piece with almost no information and I was hoping someone could help me ID it. It was supposedly bought in Kircheim, Germany. But it kinda reminds me of Perisphinctes... Would that be right? The plate is about 14 cm x 12 cm.
  7. Steneosaur tooth

    From the album Holzmaden

    A 1.3 cm long, a bit damaged Steneosaurus tooth (crocodile) from the lower Jurassic from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Germany). Another picture:
  8. Steneosaur vertebra

    From the album Holzmaden

    A rare crocodile vertebra (Steneosaurus) from the lower Jurassic from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden. Crocodile material is much in Holzmaden rarer than Ichthyosaur bones ... Some more pictures:
  9. Neue Hai,nouveau selacien,new shark

    link A new genus and species of extinct groundshark, †Diprosopovenator hilperti, gen. et sp. nov. (Carcharhiniformes, †Pseudoscyliorhinidae, fam.nov.), from the Upper Cretaceous of Germany Sebastian Stumpf, Udo Scheer & Jürgen Kriwet Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology Article: e1593185 | Received 27 Nov 2018, Accepted 26 Feb 2019, Published online: 03 May 2019 outtake:
  10. Steneosaurus tooth

    From the album Holzmaden

    A 1.2 cm long Steneosaurus tooth (crocodile) from the lower Jurassic from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Germany). That black fossil around the tooth is petrified wood. Some more pictures:
  11. Steneosaurus tooth

    From the album Holzmaden

    A 2 cm long Steneosaurus tooth (crocodile) from the lower Jurassic from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Germany). Some more pictures:
  12. Ichthyosaur tooth

    From the album Holzmaden

    A 1.6 cm long Ichthyosaur (perhaps Temnodontosaurus) tooth from the lower Jurassic from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Germany). The prep work was kinda hard because the tooth broke into two pieces. Some more pictures:
  13. I was overwhelmed with prep immediately after the 2011 trip my wife and I took to Europe, so I put down some of the more involved prep work until now. Initially I prepped only the flashiest stuff we found. Happy to be all caught up. Prep involved air scribe, dolomite microblast, and coating with a mixture of beeswax and turpentine. Hope you find them as appealing as we do. First, Drügendorf, Germany.
  14. Last Sunday I was for about 6 hours in the quarry Kromer (Lower Jurassic) near Holzmaden (Germany) and I was kinda successful there. Besides several teeth I found a beautiful piece with croc bones. At first only a cross section of a bone was visible but during the preparation some more bones got visible. I am not finished yet but I prepped about 4 hours until now. This is a picture of the unprepped stone: And after 1.5 hours: I will post a picture of the current state today... I am very excited about this find because crocodile material is much rarer than Ichthyosaur material in Holzmaden. And I never found such a croc bone until now. I am really not sure what type of bone it is. Maybe from the pelvis or from the shoulder?
  15. Crocodile vertebrae

    From the album Holzmaden

    These are two crocodile vertebrae from the lower Jurassic (Posidonia Shale) from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden. The bigger one is about 8 cm long. Here is a picture of the unprepped fossil: The prep work took about 10 hours. I am very pleased with this find because in general crocodile bones are much rarer than Ichthyosaur bones in Holzmaden. Some more pictures:
  16. Temnospondyl help

    Here's a hard one: This is a very nice temnospondyl skeleton (you can see the sclerotic rings!). It measures about 11cm long from snout to what is preserved of the tail. My question is: Can anyone tell me the genus/species and provenance of the fossil? I was told by the previous owner that it was possibly Platyrhinops from the Lower Triassic of Germany, but I have no idea. It looks like maybe a very well preserved Permian age Discosauriscus from the Czech Republic or some sort of temnospondyly from the Pfalz of Germany. I am happy to share more photos. Thanks for the help :-)
  17. Shark tooth and Ray barb?

    I found these 2 things today at the site near my home in the Miocene Burdigalian. The first is obviously a shark tooth, actually with 2cm. one of the best I've found there so far, and I'm thinking that this could belong to an Isurus sp. I'm hoping that someone can either confirm this or point me in the right direction. Down to the species would be ideal, but maybe I'm asking too much there. I've never found anything like the second one, but here I have the feeling that it might be part of a ray barb. What do you think?
  18. Hello i have found this fossil in a stone pit in Germany Hannover and don t now what this is it is 1cm large .
  19. The quarry Kromer near Holzmaden did open two weeks ago (it was closed during winter). So last Saturday I was there the first time this year and I have to say that I am kinda satisfied with my finds! I found several marine reptile teeth, some mainly incomplete bones and a fish with much potential. In this topic I want to show how I prep/prepped a plate on which originally two Ichthyosaur verts were visible. The verts are all about 4 cm big. Here is a picture of the unprepped plate: (I have the other parts...) The prep work is very difficult because the stone is extremely hard. So I have to use my air pen to remove the stone directly above the verts and then I remove the remaining thin layer with my sandblaster with about 6 bar which is probably too much for the bones but otherwise I wouldnt do any progress ... This is the current situation: Until now I prepped about 4 hours and now you see that there are even more vertebrae on the plate At least 3 and a half.... And here is the one which wasnt visible at first. I damaged it a bit but I think its not too bad. Hopefully the stone is a bit softer around this one: I think I have to work many hours on it so wish me luck @LiamL
  20. Recently I wasnt very active here but I managed to find a couple fossils in the meanwhile. A week ago I planned to visit the Pliensbach near Holzmaden in Germany. The Pliensbach is a type locality for the so called Pliensbachium, a time period in the lower Jurassic. On the way I saw an old pile with some jurassic rocks and stopped there. Luckily I was able to find some fossils there! Here is a picture of the view I had on the top of the pile: Belemnites are very common there but I found two really nice and big ones. Both are about 15 cm long and they seem to be Acrocoelites(?) ( @TqB ). They are one of my best belemnites until! I also found remains of a very rare layer with many sea urchins and sea urchin spines in it. Too bad I wasnt able to find some urchins but I found some cool plates with many spines. At the top of the pile I found some ammonites from the Sinemurian. I like the pyrite on them! The one I am holding is probably an Oxynoticeras and the other one is a Gagaticeras: Here is an overview: And one more detailed picture: Finally I found a piece of Loligosepia aalensis (vampyromorpha) and some fish rests. Here is a picture of the vampyromorpha: Alter my visit at the pile I was at the Pliensbach for a short time but I didn't really found something I can show. Maybe I will post one or two pictures tomorrow. Thanks for watching
  21. Nothosaur tooth

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A not so nice but big (3.2 cm long) Nothosaur tooth from a triassic "Bonebed" from a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg). During the preparation the tooth broke in several pieces but I managed to glue them back... Some more pictures:
  22. Hey guys I came across this fossil on the internet. I dont think this is necessarily fake, but what are the chances this fossil has had some restoration or frabrication done?
  23. Notogoneus longiceps v. Meyer, 1851

    From the album Vertebrates

    Notogoneus longiceps v. Meyer, 1851 Early Miocene Wiesbaden Formation Hartenberg-Subformation Wiesbaden-Amöneburg Hesse Germany
  24. Hey, I got these from online and the description says they are pleuroceras ammonites from the jurassic. I just wanted to be sure if this is correct? Also there's a small belemnite rostrum piece, but I guess it's to small to determine the species? Greetings Henning
  25. Birgeria mougeoti

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A fish tooth (Birgeria mougeoti) from the Triassic "Bonebed" in a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg). Its about 0.6 cm long and relatively common. Another picture:
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