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Found 158 results

  1. Jurassic fossil

    I found this fossil in Gerstetten, Germany. It is late Jurassic, 145 million years old and was found in limestone. Does anybody know what it is?
  2. fossil laws in Germany

    Does anybody know about fossil laws in Germany?
  3. I hadn't seen an echinoid with beekite before so I had to buy it. Micraster glyphus?, Campanian, Höver, Germany.
  4. Hi, a month back I bought these two plant fossils at a shop. But unfortunatly the guy at the store forgot to put the information card of them in the box. :/ What I can remember reading when I bought them was that they were from the Triassic era and that they were found in the Bruchsal area in Germany. But that's unfortunatly all I could remember, I don't know their exact age or species. I tried to research the exact age of the fossils found in that area or what species can be found there, but unfortunatly in my search I did not find any anwsers, only one guy with pictures of the same fossil species from the same area and age, but unfortunatly I did not get a reply back from the guy. So I was hoping one of you guys here could help me to ID the fossil. Thanks in advance! photo hosting
  5. a reassignment of Palezoic foliage

    kringspaphleboidfolairlinneankirej.1095-8339.2007.00616.x.pdf Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2007,153, 477–488. With 18 figures NEW GENUS FOR LATE PALAEOZOIC NONCALCAREOUS ALGAE M. KRINGS ET AL. Perissothallus, a new genus for Late Pennsylvanian–Early Permian noncalcareous algae conventionally assigned to Schizopteris(aphleboid foliage) MICHAEL KRINGS, SHARON D. KLAVINS, MANFRED BARTHEL,SUNIA LAUSBERG, RUDOLPH SERBET, THOMAS N. TAYLOR and EDITH L. TAYLOR 0,943 MB
  6. Fossil Intelligence

    Hello, TFF I was recently in Holzmaden, Germany when I found a piece of an octopus. I also recently read a book about octopus intelligence. This made me wonder if some prehistoric creatures might have been intelligent. I am especially interested in tool use, which has been observed in some modern animals. ( Octopuses, Cetaceans, Birds.) Has anyone found some possibly intelligent animals(fossilized?)
  7. Meyeria rapax HARBORT, 1905

    From the album Invertebrates

    Meyeria (Mecochirus) rapax HARBORT, 1905 Early Cretaceous Sachsenhagen Lower Saxony Germany Length 12cm
  8. Drumfish tooth?

    Hello to the teeth experts. I was just wondering if this tiny tooth (5mm.) belongs to a drumfish. It's somewhat differently shaped than the others I've found here (Miocene Burdigalian of southern Germany), but I think it fits the picture.
  9. Museum in Berlin

    So, it's me again with another Museum. This time from Berlin / Germany, visited on 14 August 2018 And Berlin is all about the BIG guys. Let's go: Giraffatitan brancai (it's still labeled in the museum as Brachiosaurus brancai) The tallest mouted skelleton in the world (43 ft 6 in) Diplodocus carnegii Dicraeosaurus hansemanni Kentrosaurus aethiopicus Tyrannosaurus Rex Mounted replika skull. The real skull is in a seperate showcase, because it's too heavy (like with Sue) Elaphrosaurus bambergi Dysalotosaurus lettowvorbecki Allosaurus fragilis I think that is a very interesting idea with the real head. It gives a better understanding what these creatures looked like. Archaeopteryx lithographica (yes thats the real one right there) Dracorex hogwartsia Rhamphorhynchus muensteri Anyone needs a Tyrannosaurus Rex tooth? You can buy one at the museum for 2700 $ And lots of fish
  10. Acrodus tooth

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A 1 cm long Acrodus tooth from a triassic bonebed in a quarry near Zwingelhausen. Those teeth are very common there!
  11. Nothosaur rib

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A partial Nothosaur rib with a length of 11 cm from a triassic bonebed in a quarry near Zwingelhausen (Germany), This was a present of a friend but I prepped it a bit more, Another picture:
  12. Bird bones?

    Hello all,. I got this bones some time ago, they come from Sauerland, Germany, more exactly the pleistocene depots in this area. They weren't sold as bird bones, but when I compared it to a fossil bird femur it looked like a match. Some bird experts here? I know @Auspex knows a lot from these animals. The bones range from just under 1 cm to 1,5 cm. Hope the pictures work. Greetings.
  13. Ichthyosaur skull bones

    From the album Holzmaden

    This fossil was found by me two years ago in the visitor quarry Kromer near Holzmaden and was prepped by Roger Furze ( @Ludwigia ). Thanks again On the piece you can see a disarticulated Ichthyosaur skull with some ribs and vertebrae. You can see one eyehole very good, although the eye itself isnt preserved. Isolated bones are not that rare in Holzmaden but such pieces are very rare ! At the maximum the piece is about 24 cm long. Unprepped: Prepped: The eyehole is very good visible: (Probably my favourite part ) The other eyehole: Some more bones: A vertebra: This one could be from a juvenile which is very rare!
  14. Steneosaurus tooth

    From the album Holzmaden

    A 1 cm long Steneosaurs (crocodile) tooth from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Lower Jurassic). Another image:
  15. Ichthyosaur tooth

    From the album Holzmaden

    A small (1 cm long) Ichthyosaur tooth from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Lower Jurassic).
  16. Pterosaur bone

    From the album Holzmaden

    This is a kinda funny combination out of a fish bone and a very rare pterosaur bone. The fish bone is the bigger one (5 cm long) and is lying on the top of the pterosaur bone. The piece comes from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Lower Jurassic). As these are marine deposits you can imagine how rare the pterosaur bone is Some very bad detailed pictures: (sorry for the bad quality but my camera is not good enough)
  17. Dactylioceras commune

    From the album Holzmaden

    A bit damaged but nevertheless a nice Dactylioceras commune with a length of 14 cm. I found it in the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Lower Jurassic).
  18. A great new video from PBS Eons about the Messel Lagerstätte in Germany.
  19. After my visit last week (http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/86063-my-little-trip-to-solnhofen/) This time I was at the visitor quarry in Solnhofen. It was very hard work and it was too hot but the finds arent too bad Its a pity that I couldnt find a fish but nevertheless I found some interesting things! Two pictures of the quarry: A beautiful 4 cm long Laevaptychus: A cuttlefish remain: with nice details (6 cm long): And my finds of the day: Two teeth Teeth arent that common in Solnhofen I assume, so I must had some serious luck The first one is 1.5 cm long and it seems to be a crocodile tooth. I think its a Steneosaurus tooth: I like the root The second isnt that big with a length of 0.7 cm. I cant determine this one... Maybe also a crocodile tooth? Maybe someone can help me a bit with determining? Thanks for your help! Hope you enjoyed the pictures!
  20. Hello, I found this piece on the tracks in the Nature park Haard near Flaesheim in Germany. Usually this area is Upper Cretacous(Santonian, Campanian) and Weichselian ice age. The rocks seems to be fine sandstone but a little bit different from the quartzite which is usally found in this area. It rather looks like a piece of one, maybe a rib?
  21. A new pufferfish from Germany

    http://www.dw.com/en/new-fish-fossil-found-in-germany/a-44397549
  22. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Belemnite Phragmocone and part of the Pro-Ostracum Germany Jurassic Period (201.3-145 million years ago) Belemnitida (or belemnites) is an extinct order of cephalopods which existed during the Mesozoic era, from the Hettangian age of the Lower Jurassic to the Maastrichtian age of the Upper Cretaceous. The belemnite is the state fossil of Delaware. Belemnites studded with small inward-curving hooks used for grasping prey. However, they lacked the pair of specialized tentacles present in modern squid. Belemnites (and other belemnoids) were distinct from modern squid by possessing hard internal skeletons. The internal skeleton was composed of the guard or rostrum (plural: rostra), a heavy solid structure at the posterior of the animals. The rostrum was usually bullet-shaped and projects prominently backward, but in the suborder Belemnotheutina, it was only present as a thin layer. While the inherited camerate portion of the internal skeleton (see below) was of aragonite, the evolutionarily novel rostrum was composed of calcite. Due to its more geologically stable calcite constitution, the rostrum is often the only remains of the animals preserved, often in very large numbers in a given area. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Clade:†Belemnoidea Order: †Belemnitida
  23. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Belemnite Phragmocone and part of the Pro-Ostracum Germany Jurassic Period (201.3-145 million years ago) Belemnitida (or belemnites) is an extinct order of cephalopods which existed during the Mesozoic era, from the Hettangian age of the Lower Jurassic to the Maastrichtian age of the Upper Cretaceous. The belemnite is the state fossil of Delaware. Belemnites studded with small inward-curving hooks used for grasping prey. However, they lacked the pair of specialized tentacles present in modern squid. Belemnites (and other belemnoids) were distinct from modern squid by possessing hard internal skeletons. The internal skeleton was composed of the guard or rostrum (plural: rostra), a heavy solid structure at the posterior of the animals. The rostrum was usually bullet-shaped and projects prominently backward, but in the suborder Belemnotheutina, it was only present as a thin layer. While the inherited camerate portion of the internal skeleton (see below) was of aragonite, the evolutionarily novel rostrum was composed of calcite. Due to its more geologically stable calcite constitution, the rostrum is often the only remains of the animals preserved, often in very large numbers in a given area. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Clade:†Belemnoidea Order: †Belemnitida
  24. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Belemnite Phragmocone and part of the Pro-Ostracum Germany Jurassic Period (201.3-145 million years ago) Belemnitida (or belemnites) is an extinct order of cephalopods which existed during the Mesozoic era, from the Hettangian age of the Lower Jurassic to the Maastrichtian age of the Upper Cretaceous. The belemnite is the state fossil of Delaware. Belemnites studded with small inward-curving hooks used for grasping prey. However, they lacked the pair of specialized tentacles present in modern squid. Belemnites (and other belemnoids) were distinct from modern squid by possessing hard internal skeletons. The internal skeleton was composed of the guard or rostrum (plural: rostra), a heavy solid structure at the posterior of the animals. The rostrum was usually bullet-shaped and projects prominently backward, but in the suborder Belemnotheutina, it was only present as a thin layer. While the inherited camerate portion of the internal skeleton (see below) was of aragonite, the evolutionarily novel rostrum was composed of calcite. Due to its more geologically stable calcite constitution, the rostrum is often the only remains of the animals preserved, often in very large numbers in a given area. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Clade:†Belemnoidea Order: †Belemnitida
  25. JURASSIC AMMONITE GERMANY 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Perisphinctes sp. Ammonite Germany Late Jurassic Oxfordian (163.5 (+/- 1) - 157.3 (+/- 1) million years ago) Perisphinctes is an extinct genus of ammonite cephalopod. They lived during the Late Jurassic Epoch, and serve as an index fossil for that time period. Shells of species belonging to this genus have been found in the Jurassic of Antarctica, Argentina, Chile, Cuba, Egypt, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Iran, Italy, Japan, Madagascar, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and Yemen. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Subclass: †Ammonoidea Order: †Ammonitida Family: †Perisphinctidae Genus: †Perisphinctes
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