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Found 21 results

  1. Hi guys, Could anyone Tell me if this Fossil Is real? I bought in México, it Is supposed to be from the State of Coahuila, it Is over 600 mm. The specimen was kept in an old man garaje not for sale, i saw it and i bought it from him.... He had another one from different genus that definetly was real from the same location but it was in a very bad condition, so i only buy this one. Thanks for any help!!
  2. Removed from a stream boulder, this Greenops like pygidium is larger than most complete Devonian trilobites from NY. Im not sure to what the exact species is so Im just calling it Greenops like. The age is Middle Devonian from Livingston County, New York. This could have been a near 5 inch bug if complete. Based on the dimensions of the largest complete Greenops sp. I have found in the collected area. From near spine tip to spine tip wide - 2.3" (58.50mm) Around 1.6" - 1.7" long (42mm)
  3. My Giant Alopiid Collection

    Hello Everyone, I’m rather fond of Giant Alopiids, and I have taken to collecting them. I find it strange that such a wonderful, yet mysterious creature remains relatively unknown and scantly studied. I may have space in my high school schedule for an independent study senior year, and I’ve considered using it to make a poster or paper on their morphology, taxonomy, phylogeny and such for The Rostrum or something. However, I’ve heard tell that there is already a comprehensive paper on giant alopiids in the works. We’ll see if there will be anything left for me to discuss. Anyway, collecting them is a slow process as they are quite rare and I am quite cheap (I have yet to find one myself). I thought I’d make a thread to show off what I have thus far and to keep them cataloged for myself. Hopefully this page will grow as time goes on Dashes are around 1 inch apart. South Carolina Alopias grandis
  4. This was apparently published in September 2018, but it slipped past me and I’m posting it here in case it slipped past my fellow thresher lovers. The allusive serrated giant thresher has been named Alopias palatasi. Of course if you like Trigonotodus better, it is Trigonotodus palatasi. Now when I add one to my collection in the far far future, I can finally put a good label to it! Here is the description: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/327871783_Kent_Ward_2018_Alopias_palatasi
  5. Hello i am offering three megafauna fossils to trade they are Megalania partial vert , Diprotodon tooth and Pallimarchus scute form Australia i am looking to trade for with some rare dinosaurs fossils. Please pm me with offers if interested thanks.
  6. My wife obtained this in China about 10-15 years ago. It was said to be from Tibet?? Can anyone here tell us more about it? It weighs 5.6 lbs. It's 10" tall and 5 1/2" across at the widest point. The insect is 2 1/2" across.
  7. Large Crinoid

    I was out fossil hunting and was seeing some small shells and pieces of small crinoid. Then I came across this giant. It is 2 pieces of crinoid stuck together in matrix. I am used to Cretaceous fossils not Pennsylvanian. Does anyone know if this is large for a crinoid? It is the largest one I have seen but I have only looked for crinoids 3 or 4 times before. Size: Longer one is 16mm in diameter. Smaller one is 14mm in diameter.
  8. At over 4" across, this is the last few chambers of by far the largest diameter belemnite phragmocone I've ever seen. (If anyone has one from a Megateuthis, I'd love to see it! - they don't seem ever to be preserved.) Given to me by a friend, it is in a nodule from the Jet Rock (Upper Lias, Lower Jurassic) of Port Mulgrave, north Yorkshire coast. It must have belonged to an exceptionally large Acrocoelites trisulculosus which is probably the only belemnite to occur in this bed. It's a large species anyway - typical rostra of it are 5 - 7" long but about 9" has very rarely been recorded so a bit longer may be possible. Photo 6: Not having such a large Acrocoelites in my collection, I've done a conservative mock-up of it with a smallish (9") Megateuthis and another piece of phragmocone which is my second largest... A total length of 20 - 24" seems about right. Photo 7: For comparison , I have a complete but crushed example of A. trisulculosus about 12" long, the rostrum being 6.5". 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) This should probably be stretched more... 7) A normal size Acrocoelites trisulculosus with crushed phragmocone (the strange ridged structure on top of it is a crushed on-edge Harpoceras shell mouth)
  9. Can anyone help me identify this tooth? Found at Brownies Beach on the Chesapeake Bay. It looks similar to Makos, but I can't find any pictures of one this curved?
  10. Hello from Cyprus, warm wishes for exciting finds to everyone! Here is a relatively bigger oyster than my usual finds, this one is complete and inside small crystals have formed, could be calcite not sure. Took advantage of the heavy rainfall and found it on muddy collapsing hills north of akrotiri area. I found half, and half a meter further I dug out the other half Perhaps you can better see the small crystals that formed all over inside both parts below Nearby I found also the following: found position, but i think they are not matching and this single one
  11. T-Rex toenail?

    There is a spring fed pond in Weatherford, Tx. that has a grouping of the largest fossils that i have ever seen. These fossils were gathered and placed in a circle around this pond by ancient Indians who lived there prior to and during the time that my friend's ancestors purchased the land. Some single bones are larger than my car, only a very few could be picked up by man alone, and I got a few by the owners permission, and here is one of those!
  12. My recent trip to the Fort Payne has me wondering how big do brachiopods get? So why not a thread to show off the largest ones we've found! Here's some of my monsters... First up Productus sp. from the Fort Payne, Lower Mississippain. I think this is Syringothyris sp. from the same formation as the other. I believe this is Rhipidomella sp. (same formation.) Lets see yours!
  13. Giant land gastropod?

    I cannot find any info on what this might be...and I have spent 10's of hours trying to. It looks to have "bite or tooth scars" on the top (bottom if it's a ammonoid or etc.) rear of the fossil. I bought it at a garage sale near Honey Lake, Ca. I was laughed at, but I still think it's a huge snail of some sort. It's fossil weight is about 45 lbs. Any help with this large paper weight is great. Thank you very much, Jeri
  14. Giant Sloth Skeleton

    From the album Fossil Diagrams

  15. what do you think about this tooth with a size near 190mm?Have few serrations according to the seller but not crack or lateral problems.
  16. Giant Shell

    What ever it was in this shell it was giant , but what it was? Can any one help me with it?? Found in North Wales Cambrian Coast, Irish Sea
  17. This fossil is likely a whole new species of ancient millipede. PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY ANDREW MACRAE By Brian Clark Howard PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 28, 2016 Visitors to a world-famous fossil bed in Canada have discovered a handful of strange specimens that may likely turn out to be up to three new species of large ancient millipedes. The find was made by chance last year in the Joggins Fossil Cliffs, which stretch several miles along the Bay of Fundy. The fossils are being analyzed now in labs in the United States and Canada. Giant ancient millipedes are nothing new for the Joggins cliffs, which are listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site. Since the 1800s, the cliffs have yielded numerous finds, including tracks and segments of millipedes that may have been seven feet long. The new fossil millipedes weren't quite as large: They were likely about a foot long (still relatively big), says Joe Hannibal, a paleontologist with the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, who is studying the new fossils, along with Canadian paleontologist Melissa Grey. The many-legged creatures were likely vegetarians, as most millipedes are, says Hannibal. The leggy animals crawled through ancient forests, which are also partially preserved in the fossil beds in the form of tree trunks. (Watch a video of glowing millipedes.) The new fossils are likely about 300 million years old, says Hannibal, who just returned to Ohio after a trip in the field to Joggins. The fossils are therefore from the Upper Carboniferous or Pennsylvanian period, which is often called the “Coal Age,” since much of the world’s coal originates from deposits of organic material laid down during that time. In fact, Joggins was once mined for its rich coal beds. Fossils were unearthed by miners blasting through its layers of sandstone and shale. The specimens included other millipedes, but no one had seen anything quite like the handful of fossils that were found there last year by guests to the cliffs. The fossils are likely one to three different species, says Hannibal, who is helping with the analysis. They will likely fit into the group known as the archipolypods, which means ancient many feet. Members of this group have been found in Illinois, the Czech Republic, Great Britain, and beyond. Although many of the legs of the animals are quite well preserved, their tops are not in good shape. (See how a millipede toddler learned to walk.) “So we don’t know what their tops were like,” says Hannibal. “They might have had spines, like some of their relatives, which look like big bottle brushes. Or they might have had no spines. So far we don’t have any evidence.” The next question will also be exactly how the new fossils may be related to other millipedes, says Hannibal. (Learn about the world's leggiest animal.) The fossils are an exciting find, says Alton C. Dooley, Jr., a National Geographic explorer who has studied ancient life and is the executive director of the Western Science Center in California. The specimens prove that there are still plenty of relatively large animals awaiting discovery. "By the Carboniferous, life had become so well established on land that there were thriving biomes all over the world," says Dooley. "But the flora and fauna was in many ways so different from what we have today that it’s almost like an alien landscape, and we’re still a long way from fully understanding how all the parts interacted, or even what all the parts were." http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/09/fossil-millipedes-discovered-bay-of-fundy-joggins-cliff/?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=Social&utm_content=link_fb20160926news-millipedes&utm_campaign=Content&sf37237741=1
  18. Castoroides

    http://www.researchgate.net/publication/268035498_Taxonomy_of_the_Pleistocene_giant_beaver_Castoroides_(Rodentia_Castoridae)_from_the_southeastern_United_States
  19. Giant fossil Balanid Concavus Concavus

    From the album Greek Giant Balanids

    Giant Balanid Concavus Concavus Greece Pliocene 7,5 cm length personal find
  20. Giant fossil Balanid Concavus Concavus

    From the album Greek Giant Balanids

    Giant Balanid Concavus Concavus Greece Pliocene 9 cm length personal find
  21. Giant Balanid find

    From the album Greek Giant Balanids

    Giant Balanid Concavus Concavus Greece Pliocene 10 cm length personal find
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