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Found 5 results

  1. Possible Ginkgo Fossil

    Found this rock a while back on the north shore of Lake Erie. Not sure of the age but I’ve found rocks of Devonian and slurian there. I’m no expert on plants but the one on here looks like a ginkgo to me. I’m unsure of the other things on here for the most part. Any ID Helps. Thanks!
  2. Ginkgo leaf or something else?

    I am wondering if this is a Ginkgo leaf or something else? Looks like a Mazon Creek fossil to me.
  3. Random Assortment

    From the album My Collection

    This is the final shelf in my display case. This is a complete random assortment of fossils (Basically, whatever didn't fit on other shelves due to space got put here). This shelf features everything from Megalodon teeth to a cave bear digit
  4. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since June 25, 2018. Kingdom Plantae Division Pteridospermatophyta - The Seed Ferns Pteridosperms - Antarctica Meyer-Berthaud, B., T.N. Taylor, and E.L. Taylor (1993). Petrified Stems Bearing Dicroidium Leaves from the Triassic of Antarctica. Palaeontology, Vol.36, Part 2. Taylor, E.L. (1996). Enigmatic gymnosperms? Structurally preserved Permian and Triassic seed ferns from Antarctica. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 90. Pteridosperms - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Jacob, K. and T. Banerjee (1953). The Occurrence of Glossopteris Fronds in the North-East Frontier Tracts, With a Brief Review of the Gondwanas of North-Eastern India. Proc. Nat. Inst. Sci. India, Vol. XX. Pant, D.D. and B.K. Derma (1963). On the Structure of Leaves of Rhabdotaenia Pant from the Raniganj Coalfield, India. Palaeontology, Vol.6, Part 2. Srivastava, A.K., V.A. Krassilov and D. Agnihotri (2011). Peltasperms in the Permian of India and their bearing on Gondwanaland reconstruction and climatic interpretation. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology and Palaeoecology, 310. Pteridosperms - Australia/New Zealand Anderson, H.M., W.B.K. Holmes, and L.A. Fitness (2008). Stems With Attached Dicroidium Leaves from the Ipswich Coal Measures, Queensland, Australia. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, 52(2). Retallack, G.J. (2002). Lepidopteris callipteroides, an earliest Triassic seed fern of the Sydney Basin, southeastern Australia. Alcheringa, 26. Pteridosperms - Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Barnard, P.D.W. (1960). Calathospermum fimbriatum Sp.Nov., A Lower Carboniferous Pteridosperm Cupule from Scotland. Palaeontology, Vol.3, Part 3. Boyarina, N. (2010). Late Gzhelian pteridosperms with callipterid foliage of the Donets Basin, Ukraine. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 55(2). Boyarina, N. (1994). Callipterid Pteridosperms from the Early Permian of Ukraine. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 39(1). Krings, M., A. Grewing and T.N. Taylor (2003). Mariopterid pteridosperms, scrambling and climbing vines of the Late Carboniferous swamp forest: a case study from the Namurian B of Hagen-Vorhalle (Germany). Bot.Jahrb.Syst., 124(4). Šimůnek, Z. (2010). Cuticles of Paripteris Gothan, 1941 (Pteridospermopsida) from the Westphalian of Poland. Bulletin of Geosciences, 85(2). Šimůnek, Z. (2009). A large specimen and cuticles of Peripteris gigantea (Sternberg) Gothan from its type area Zacler (Pennsylvanian, Czech Republic). Bulletin of Geosciences, 84(2). Šimůnek, Z. and C.J. Cleal (2013). The epidermis of cyclopteroid Laveineopteris bohemica (Medullosales) from the Middle Pennsylvanian Radnice Member, Czech Republic. Bulletin of Geosciences, 88(1). Tenchov, Y.G. and C.A. Cleal (2010). Neuralethopteris foliage (Medullosales) in the Carboniferous of Dobrudzha Coalfield, Bulgaria. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 158. Wachtler, M. (2011). Ferns and Seed Ferns from the Early-Middle Triassic (Anisian) Piz da Peres (Dolomites - Northern Italy). Dolomythos, Innichen. Pteridosperms - North America Baumgardner, R.W., W.A. DiMichele and N. de Siqueira Vieira (2016). An early Permian coastal flora dominated by Germaropteris martinsii from basinal sediments in the Midland Basin, West Texas. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 459. Baxter, R.W. (1978). Sphenopteris sellardsii, A Problematical Pteridosperm from the Permian of Kansas. The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Paper 94. Delevoryas, T. and T.N. Taylor (1969). A Probable Pteridosperm With Eremopterid Foliage from the Allegheny Group of Northern Pennsylvania. Peabody Museum of Natural History, Postilla Number 133. DiMichele, W.A., et al. (2005). The Permian Peltasperm Radiation: Evidence from the Southwestern United States. In: The Nonmarine Permian. Lucas, S.G. and K.E. Zeigler (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin Number 30. Eggert, D.A. and R.W. Kryder (1969). A New Species of Aulacotheca (Pteridospermales) from the Middle Pennsylvanian of Iowa. Palaeontology, Vol.12, Part 3. Goubet, P., H.W. Pfefferkorn, and W.H. Gillespie (2000). Neuralethopterids (trigonocarpalean pteridosperms) from the Early Pennsylvanian of eastern North America. PaleoBios, 20(3). Lyons, P.C. and J.-P. Laveine (2005). Association of entire orbicular cyclopterids with Neuropteris ovata pinnate foliage from the Late Pennsylvanian (Stephanian) of West Virginia, USA: taxonomical implications. Revue de Paleobiologie, Geneve, 24(2). Mamay, S.H., D.S. Chaney and W.A. DiMichele (2009). Comia, A Seed Plant Possibly of Peltaspermous Affinity: A Brief Review of the Genus and Description of Two New Species from the Early Permian (Artinskian) of Texas, C. greggii sp.nov. and C. craddockii sp.nov. Int.J. Plant Sci., 170(2). Zodrow, E.L., Y.G. Tenchov and C.J. Cleal (2007). The arborescent Linopteris obliqua plant (Medullosales, Pennsylvanian). Bulletin of Geosciences, 82(1). General Pteridosperms Arnold, C.A. (1935). Observations on Alethopteris grandifolia Newberry and its Seeds. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.IV, Number 15. Cleal, C.J., J.-P. Laveine, and C.H. Shute (1998). Further Observations on the Upper Carboniferous Pteridosperm Frond Macroneuropteris macrophylla. Palaeontology, Vol.41, Part 3. Cleal, C.J., J.-P. Laveine, and C.H. Shute (1996). Architecture of the Upper Carboniferous Pteridosperm Frond Macroneuropteris macrophylla. Palaeontology, Vol.39, Part 3. Taylor, E.L., et al. (2006). Mesozoic seed ferns: Old paradigms, new discoveries. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society, 133(1). Townrow, J.A. (1960). The Peltaspermaceae, A Pteridosperm Family of Permian and Triassic Age. Palaeontology, Vol.3, Part 3. Wagner, R.H. and C. Alvarez-Vazquez (2010). A redescription of the Stephanian species Callipteridium virginianum (Fontaine & White, 1880) comb.nov. and Alethopteris leonensis Wagner, 1964. Scripta Geologica Special Issue, 7. Wagner, R.H. and C. Alvarez-Vazquez (2008). A Revision of the Lower Pennsylvanian Alethopteris lonchitica (auctorum) and its Identity with Alethopteris urophylla. Revista Espanola de Paleontologia, 23(2). Wagner, R.H. and M.P. Castro (1998). Neuropteris obtusa, a Rare but Widespread Late Carboniferous Pteridosperm. Palaeontology, Vol.41, Part 1. Zodrow, E.L., Y. G. Tenchov and C.J. Cleal (2007). The arborescent Linopteris obliqua plant (Medullosales, Pennsylvanian). Bulletin of Geosciences, 82(1). Division Progymnospermophyta Anderson, H.M., N. Hiller and R.W. Gess (1995). Archaeopteris (Progymnospermopsida) from the Devonian of southern Africa. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 117. Arnold, C.A. (1935). On Seedlike Structures Associated With Archaeopteris, from the Upper Devonian of Northern Pennsylvania. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.IV, Number 16. Beck, C.B. (1976). Current Status of the Progymnospermopsida. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 21. Beck, C.B. (1971). On the Anatomy and Morphology of Lateral Branch Systems of Archaeopteris. Amer.J.Bot., 58(8). Beck, C.B. (1962). Reconstructions of Archaeopteris, and Further Consideration of its Phylogenetic Position. Amer.Jour.Bot., 49(4). Fairon-Demaret, M. and I. Leponce (2001). Leaf Dimorphism in Archaeopteris roemeriana (Progymnosperm): Further Early Fossil Evidence of Shoot Diversiventrality. American Journal of Botany, 88(4). Fairon-Demaret, M., I. Leponce and M. Streel (2001). Archaeopteris from the Upper Famennian of Belgium: heterospory, nomenclature, and palaeobiogeography. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 115. Meyer-Berthaud, B., S.E. Scheckler and J. Wendt (1999). Archaeopteris is the earliest known modern tree. Nature, Vol.398. Snigirevskaya, N.S. and S.M. Snigirevsky (2001). New locality of Callixylon (Archaeopteridaceae) in the Late Devonian of Andoma Mountain (Vologda Region, north-west Russia) and its importance for the reconstruction of archaeopterids distribution. Acta Palaeobot., 41(2). Trivett, M.L. (1993). An architectural analysis of Archaeopteris, a fossil tree with pseudomonopodial and opportunistic adventitious growth. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 111. Division Cycadophyta - The Cycads Cycads - Antarctica Klavins, S.D., et al. (2003). Gymnosperms from the Middle Triassic of Antarctica: The First Structurally Preserved Cycad Pollen Cone. Int.J. Plant Sci., 164(6). Cycads - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Gao, Z. and B.A. Thomas (1989). A Review of Fossil Cycad Megasporophylls, With New Evidence of Crossozamia Pomel and its Associated Leaves from the Lower Permian of Taiyuan, China. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 60. Wang, S.-J., X.-Y. He and L.-Y. Shao (2011). Cycad Wood from the Lopingian (Late Permian) of Southern China: Shuichengoxylon tianii Gen. et Sp.Nov. Int.J. Plant Sci., 172(5). Cycads - Australia/New Zealand Hill, R.S. (1980). Three New Eocene Cycads from Eastern Australia. Aust.J.Bot., 28. Cycads - Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Dower, B.L., R.M. Bateman, and D.W. Stevenson (2004). Systematics, Ontogeny, and Phylogenetic Implications of Exceptional Anatomically Preserved Cycadophyte Leaves from the Middle Jurassic of Bearreraig Bay, Skye, Northwest Scotland. The Botanical Review, 70(2). Pott, C., H. Kerp, and M. Krings (2007). Pseudoctenis cornelii nov.spec. (cycadalean foliage) from the Carnian (Upper Triassic) of Lunz, Lower Austria. Ann.Naturhist.Mus. Wien, 109A. Rowe, N.P. (1992). The Gymnosperm Archaeopteridium tschermakii and an Associated Glandular Fructification from the Upper Visean Drybrook Sandstone of Great Britain. Palaeontology, Vol.35, Part 4. Rozynek, B. (2008). Schozachia donaea n.gen., n.sp., a new cycad megasporophyll from the Middle Triassic (Ladinian) of Southern Germany. Palaeodiversity, 1. Wachtler, M. (2010). About the origin of Cycads and some enigmatic angiosperm-like fructifications from the Early-Middle Triassic (Anisian) Braies Dolomites (Northern Italy). Dolomythos, 1. Cycads - North America Ash, S. (2001). New cycadophytes from the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation of the southwestern United States. PaleoBios, 21(1). Delevoryas, T. and R.C. Hope (1971). A New Triassic Cycad and its Phyletic Implications. Peabody Museum of Natural History, Postilla Number 150. Singleton, S. Cycad Anatomy and Fossil Occurrences in Texas. Houston Gem and Mineral Society. Wieland, G.R. (1906). American Fossil Cycads. Carnegie Institution of Washington, Publication Number 34. (426 pages, 28.2 MB download) Cycads - South America/Central America/Caribbean Martinez, L.C.A., A.E.E. Artabe and J. Bodnar (2012). A new cycad stem from the Cretaceous in Argentina and its phylogenetic relationships with other Cycadales. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 170. General Cycads Bonde, S.D., et al. (2004). Fossil chromosomes in an extinct Gondwanan seed plant (Pentoxylon). Current Science, Vol.87, Number 7. Buckley, R. (1999). A Brief Review of the Fossil Cycads. Palm and Cycad Society of Florida. Harris, T.M. (1961). The Fossil Cycads. Palaeontology, Vol.4, Part 3. Mamay, S.H. (1976). Paleozoic Origin of the Cycads. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 934. Division Ginkgophyta - The Ginkgos Bauer, K., E. Kustatscher and M. Krings (2013). The ginkgophytes from the German Kupferschiefer (Permian), with considerations on the taxonomic history and use of Baiera and Sphenobaiera. Bulletin of Geosciences, 88(3). Czier, Z. (1998). Ginkgo Foliage from the Jurassic of the Carpathian Basin. Palaeontology, Vol.41, Part 2. Denk, T. and D. Velitzelos (2002). First evidence of epidermal structures of Ginkgo from the Mediterranean Tertiary. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 120. Fischer, T.C., et al. (2010). Permian ginkgophyte fossils from the Dolomites resemble extant O-ha-tsuki aberrant leaf-like fructifications of Ginkgo biloba L. BMC Evolutionary Biology, 10. Mays, C., M. Steinthorsdottir and J.D. Stilwell (2015). Climatic implications of Gingkoites waarrensis Douglas emend. from the south polar Tupuangi flora, Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian), Chatham Islands. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 438. Meller, B., et al. (2015). Middle Miocene macrofloral elements from the Lavanttal Basin, Austria, Part 1. Ginkgo adiantoides (Unger) Heer. Austrian Journal of Earth Sciences, Volume 180/2. Ohana, T. and T. Kimura (1986). Ginkgo diminuta, sp.nov., from the Upper Cretaceous Omichidami Formation in the Inner Zone of Japan. Proc. Japan Acad., Series B, Vol.62, Number 9. Villar de Seoane, L., et al. (2015). Ginkgoites patagonica (Berry) Comb.Nov. from the Eocene of Patagonia: Last Ginkgoalean Record in South America. Int.J. Plant Sci., 176(4). Wang, Y., et al. (2012). Jurassic mimicry between a hangingfly and a ginkgo from China. PNAS, Vol.109, Number 50. Zhou, Z., et al. (2012). Tertiary Ginkgo Ovulate Organs With Associated Leaves from North Dakota, U.S.A., And Their Evolutionary Significance. Int.J. Plant Sci., 173(1). Division Pinophyta - The Conifers Conifers - Africa/Middle East Chaloner, W.G. and J. Lorch (1960). An Opposite-Leaved Conifer from the Jurassic of Israel. Palaeontology, Vol.2, Part 2. Conifers - Antarctica Pujana, R.R., S.A. Marenssi and S.N. Santillana (2015). Fossil woods from the Cross Valley Formation (Paleocene of West Antarctica): Araucariaceae-dominated forests. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 222. Conifers - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands He, W., B. Sun and Y.-S. Liu (2012). Fokienia shengxianensis sp.nov. (Cupressaceae) from the late Miocene of eastern China and its paleoecological implications. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 176-177. Kimura, T., K-i. Saiki and T. Arai (1985). Frenelopsis choshiensis sp.nov., a Cheirolepidiaceous Conifer from the Lower Cretaceous Choshi Group in the Outer Zone of Japan. Proc. Japan Acad., Series B, Vol.61, Number 9. Pole, M., et al. (2016). The rise and demise of Podozamites in east Asia - An extinct conifer life style. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 464. Shi, G., et al. (2014). Whole-Plant Reconstruction and Phylogenetic Relationships of Elatides zhoui (Cupressaceae) from the Early Cretaceous of Mongolia. Int.J. Plant Sci., 175(8). Wang, Z.-X., et al. (2016). A new cordaitean pollen cone and pollen grains in situ from the Early Permian of Hexi Corridor and its geotectonic signiicance. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 463. Wang, Z.-X., et al. (2015). Elatides sandaolingensis n.sp. (Cupressaceae sensu lato) - A new fossil conifer with cones from the Middle Jurassic of Xinjiang, northwestern China. Palaeoworld, xxx. (Article in Press) Yamakawa, C., et al. (2017). Composition and paleoenvironment of wetland forests dominated by Glyptostobus and Metasequoia in the latest Pliocene (2.6 Ma) in central Japan. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 467. Conifers - Australia/New Zealand Bigwood, A.J. and R.S. Hill (1985). Tertiary Araucarian Macrofossils from Tasmania. Aust.J.Bot., 33. Hill, R.S. and A.J. Bigwood (1987). Tertiary gymnosperms from Tasmania: Araucariaceae. Alcheringa, 11. Jansson, I.-M. (2006). An Early Jurassic conifer-dominated assemblage of the Clarence-Moreton Basin, eastern Australia. Masters thesis, Lund University. Conifers - Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Alvin, K.L. (1977). The Conifers Frenelopsis and Manica in the Cretaceous of Portugal. Palaeontology, Vol.20, Part 2. Blokhina, N.I., M.A. Afonin and T.M. Kodrul (2010). Fossil Wood of Sequoioxylon burejense sp.nov. (Taxodiacead) from the Upper Cretaceous of the Zeya-Bureya Basin (Russian Far East). Paleontological Journal, Vol.44, Number 10. Fowler, K., N. Edwards and D.W. Brett (1973). In situ Coniferous (Taxodiaceous) Tree Remains in the Upper Eocene of Southern England. Palaeontology, Vol.16, Part 1. Francis, J.E. (1983). The Dominant Conifer of the Jurassic Purbeck Formation, England. Palaeontology, Vol.26, Part 2. Kłusek, M. (2014). Miocene coniferous woods of the Polish Carpathian Foredeep. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 59(3). Kvaček, J. (2013). Pinus landsbergensis sp.nov., new pine from the Cenomanian of the Czech Republic. Bulletin of Geosciences, 88(4). Šimůnek, Z., S. Opluštil and J. Drábková (2009). Cordaites borassifolius (Sternberg) Unger (Cordaitales) from the Radnice Basin (Bolsovian, Czech Republic). Bulletin of Geosciences, 84(2). Teodoridis, V. and J. Sakala (2008). Early Miocene conifer macrofossils from the Most Basin (Czech Republic). N.Jb.Geol.Palaont.Abh., Vol.250/3. Vassio, E., et al. (2008). Wood anatomy of the Glyptostrobus europaeus "whole plant" from a Pliocene fossil forest of Italy. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 151. Wachtler, M. (2011). Evolutionary Lines of Conifers from the Early-Middle Triassic (Anisian) Piz Da Peres (Dolomites - Northern Italy). Dolomythos. Watson, J. (1977). Some Lower Cretaceous Conifers of the Cheirolepidiaceae from the U.S.A. and England. Palaeontology, Vol.20, Part 4. Watson, J., H.L. Fisher, and N.A. Hall (1988). The Holotype of the Wealden Conifer Brachyphyllum punctatum Michael. Palaeontology, Vol.31, Part 4. Conifers - North America Arnold, C.A. (1955). Tertiary Conifers from the Princeton Coal Field of British Columbia. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - University of Michigan, Vol.XII, Number 12. Ash, S.R. and R.A. Savidge (2004). The Bark of the Late Triassic Araucarioxylon arizonicum Tree from Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona. IAWA Journal, Vol.25(3). Axsmith, B.J., I.H. Escapa and P. Huber (2008). 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  5. Dear all, Since it is simply impossible for an individual collector to collect everywhere, trading offers a great method to diversify. Several TFF Members are actively collecting plant fossils and together we cover an almost worldwide range of different localities. Even if you are specializing in a particular area, fossils of equivalent age from elsewhere could prove interesting material for comparison purposes (for example, there are some interesting parallels and differences between the European and North American Pennsylvanian floras). My question is, therefore: is anyone interested in trading plant fossil material? Anyone who had any plant material to offer for trade, or is looking for particular specimens to trade, please chime in! Cheers, Tim
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