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Found 20 results

  1. Petrified Creature found in Canyon Lake

    I found this petrified Creature in Canyon Lake, Texas next to the Guadalupe River, but on private property with the property owners permission. I was wondering if anyone knew what it is?
  2. Early- and Mid-Cretaceous Archosaur Localities of North-Central Texas. Guidebook for the field trip held October 13, 2015 in conjunction with the 75th Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology in Dallas, Texas https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283711331_Early-_and_Mid-Cretaceous_Archosaur_Localities_of_North_Central_Texas https://figshare.com/articles/Early_and_Mid_Cretaceous_Archosaur_Localities_of_North_Central_Texas/1608173 http://chrisnoto.com/publications.html Yours, Paul H.
  3. Hello all, I am trying to identify various fossils from the Cretaceous Glen Rose Formation around Spring Branch, Texas. Could anyone verify my identifications... The first is gastropod molds which I assumed to be either a Turritella or Cerithium species. The second I named Nerinea texana. The third is an ornamented urchin indicative of the Glen Rose formation called Salenia texana. Finally the curly fossils I am unsure if those are gastropods? And the final fossil is a clam of sorts with polychaete worms growing on it. Any idea what this clam may be?
  4. Tapes decepta Mollusk Cast a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Tapes decepta Mollusk Cast SITE LOCATION: Glen Rose Formation, Bandera County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Clams and their relatives (oysters, scallops, and mussels) are often called bivalves (or bivalved mollusks) because their shell is composed of two parts called valves. Bivalves have a long history. Their fossils first appear in rocks that date to the middle of the Cambrian Period, about 510 million years ago. Although the group became increasingly abundant about 400 million years ago during the Devonian Period, bivalves really took off following the massive extinction at the close of the Permian Period. Modern bivalves live in a variety of marine and freshwater environments, from the shallow waters near shore to great depths in the ocean. Fossils indicate that bivalves have occupied most of these environments for more than 450 million years, but during the Paleozoic Era they were especially common in near-shore environments. The Veneridae or venerids, common name the venus clams, are a very large family of minute to large, saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs. Over 500 living species of venerid bivalves are known, most of which are edible, and many of which are exploited as food sources. Many of the most important edible species are commonly known (in the USA) simply as "clams". Venerids make up a significant proportion of the world fishery of edible bivalves. The family includes some species that are important commercially, such as (in the USA) the hard clam or quahog, Mercenaria mercenaria. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Veneroida Family: Veneridae Genus: Tapes Species: decepta
  5. Tapes decepta Mollusk Cast a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Tapes decepta Mollusk Cast SITE LOCATION: Glen Rose Formation, Bandera County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Clams and their relatives (oysters, scallops, and mussels) are often called bivalves (or bivalved mollusks) because their shell is composed of two parts called valves. Bivalves have a long history. Their fossils first appear in rocks that date to the middle of the Cambrian Period, about 510 million years ago. Although the group became increasingly abundant about 400 million years ago during the Devonian Period, bivalves really took off following the massive extinction at the close of the Permian Period. Modern bivalves live in a variety of marine and freshwater environments, from the shallow waters near shore to great depths in the ocean. Fossils indicate that bivalves have occupied most of these environments for more than 450 million years, but during the Paleozoic Era they were especially common in near-shore environments. The Veneridae or venerids, common name the venus clams, are a very large family of minute to large, saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs. Over 500 living species of venerid bivalves are known, most of which are edible, and many of which are exploited as food sources. Many of the most important edible species are commonly known (in the USA) simply as "clams". Venerids make up a significant proportion of the world fishery of edible bivalves. The family includes some species that are important commercially, such as (in the USA) the hard clam or quahog, Mercenaria mercenaria. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Veneroida Family: Veneridae Genus: Tapes Species: decepta
  6. After several attempts to identify a vertebrae I had found in the upper Glen Rose Formation in Hood Co. Texas Troodon had input that was helpful. His interpretation of the vert as being crockish had me digging deeper into attempting an ID. Although there is very little information of vertebrate finds in the Glen Rose material there is some. I found it in Wikipedia as possibly: Genus Pachycheilosuchus, a crocodylomorph. The description of the procoelous vertebrae has me bamfoozled. It has a description of the verts as cupped on the anterior and rounded as posterior. Clearly mine is cupped on both. That is where the similiarity ends. Hopefully over the next few trips to the site I will find more, I think after reading the available papers some of theother bone material may be related the vert not turtle as we first suspected. The croclike fossil is very small and was considered adult at ~ 2.0 Ft or 63.5 -80 cm. If interested reply or just follow because I will post more information (ON THIS LINK) as it becomes available. Jess B.
  7. Small dino tail bone

    Found in clay strata sandwiched between layers of dino print limestone. Three different strata containing prints. Bone is shown also in trip section with latest print. If someone has an inkling as to a species please post away. I am going back as soon as possible. (BTW: Most bone material is crushed from the dino traffic in the immediate area) Bone2stone
  8. Took an extra day off for the Labor day weekend to relax in the country side away from the Dallas Tx area. Quite peaceful in my travel trailer under the huge Spanish Oaks. Too much tequila that night before the dig did not help the situation, found it difficult to roll out of bed the next morning. My bud promised me a visit to his print site with Professor Anderson. Gas a little hard to come by but he managed to find a station with a rationed supply. Finnally he came out and I got to handle some facinating finds he had recently made and he too got to see some of my stuff. I do think we managed facinate each other with the specimens we drug out. He had an amazing Sloth claw from the Sulphur area and I had my pseudounicornious and a pterosaur skull. He seemed to be more interested in the decacarcinus crab (Unidentified) I brought with me. But what we did at camp is not what I wanted to post about. (I am not allowed to post pictures of the site only my my finds) While Prof Anderson and Steve (my bud) worked out another huge print I was working on a thin deposit of clay "bone infested" material. Most of the bone material is scattered partials of turtle (First time I have found fossil turtle in the Glen Rose material) but there it was. The prints are quite abundant there and easy to "pick up" natural casts everywhere! That was not what I was there to investigate. The bone material was abundant and easy to extract once the 6" limestone cap was removed. Steve lifted some cap stone and said get after it. Two hours was all the time we had but it was enough to convince me to go back soon. After scratching at the exposure I found plenty of turtle material but all was crushed. Makes sence concidering all the dino activity in the immediate area would crush any underlying material. I gathered some of the fragments and tried to piece them together with limited success. I then found the one thing I had hoped for. A dino bone! Although small it was a first in that site. A "bird like" dino tail bone! I have hopes someone will be able to narrow down a few details on it. If there are any ideas I am open to suggestions as to id. BTW: I also found a very good print which I promptly placed in the truck to grace my collection. Area circled is a smaller print super-imposed on top of juvenile print. What you can see is bottom of natural cast. Take a look and let me know what you think. Reached Limit.
  9. This is an uncommon echinoid found in the upper Glen Rose Formation of Texas. Found Nov. 8, 2014 by John Jackson. NHM reference.
  10. Pseudodiadema aguilerai

    Found by John Jackson on April 13, 2013 in northern Comal County, Texas. This is a very uncommon echinoid species. NHM reference
  11. The specimen was collected by John Jackson on July 27, 2013 in northern Comal County, Texas. This is an extremely rare echinoid species. NHM reference
  12. Lunatia or Tylostoma?

    My family just returned from a three day, New Years visit to Boerne ("Bernie"), Texas. On our way home, we stopped of by a construction site on the northwest side of San Antonio. I believe it was Glen Rose Formation. We found some nice specimens, including gastropods, brachiopods and even some echinoids. The largest specimens are shown below. The scale is in centimeters. My question is, are these specimens Tylostoma sp. or Lunatia pedernales? I've seen them identified on TFF as Tylostoma. But in the HGMS Texas Cretaceous Gastropods book, they describe Tylostoma of similar sizes as having a spire 50% of the total length of the shell. However, the Lunatia pedernales is described as having a spire 25% of the total length. I would just like some clarification. I'm leaning toward Lunatia, but I'm easy to persuade by those with far more knowledge and experience... Thanks in advance for your help.
  13. Yet Another Lower Glen Rose Haul

    Happy Holidays TFF!!!! I ventured out over the weekend to see what I could find....hope you enjoy My hunting site:
  14. Well, when the fossils start calling, I must answer Here are some site pics and a few pics of my finds. I only spent an hour hunting as to not cause pain in my back, so I took several site pics so I didnt have to keep bending over and picking up fossils ...But you know me and my gastropods...had to bend over and pick those up... I have hunted this site for over 6 years and I am still BLOWN away by how many fossils are still at the site! Its also amazing how so many different species inhabited the tiny area I hunt. Amazing! Enjoy! Continued*
  15. Greetings TFF!!! Sorry I have been gone for a while. I had to have another spine surgery, and will not be recovered until 2013. I broke doctors orders yesterday and went on a hour hunt....now I see why he said to WAIT as the pain is horrible...but worth it!! As some of you know, the lake where I live over the past few months went up approx 17 feet, covering my fossil hunting site, but now the water has dropped and the fossils are exposed again! However the landscape is so different than before the rains. I have hunted this site for over 6+ years and to my suprise, thanks to the rains and the elevation and dropping of the water levels, my huting site is as if no one has ever hunted it before. I always knew the vast amount of fossils there, but now my mind is just blown to know that TONS more have surfaced! Also yesterday for the first time ever at my site, I found my first arrow-head or point. I was in shock! Here are my finds from yesterday: Sorry to group the fossils but due to my surgical pain, its the best I can do for now! Hope you enjoy it as much as I did! Of course and as always at the lake: Glen Rose, Cretaceous - Texas Gastropods, Echinoid Heteraster, numerous Bivalves, Trigonias, Pecten Nerithea....... Here are the Echinoid Heteraster:
  16. Weird Shape

    Does anyone recognize this? Found in the Lower Cretaceous here in Texas. I'm talking about the objects in the center of the photo with the sorta x-like shape. But the blade-like things to the right are also stumping me.
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