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Found 17 results

  1. Globidens alabamaensis?

    While collecting at a location in SE Virginia which produces a mixture of material from the Eocene Nanjemoy Formation and late Miocene/early Pliocene Yorktown Formation, I was shocked to find what I believe to be a cretaceous Globidens sp. anterior tooth fragment. My only explanation for this would be that it must have been redeposited into the Eocene beds and finally exposed with rest of the material. The texture is classic Globidens. The only other species with a slightly similar texture found within these formations (though still markedly different), would be Squalodon sp., however if the tooth were more complete it would clearly prove to be hollow with a conical interior consistent with squamates like mosasaurs. The fragment is approximately 7/8" x 1/2". This is the first bit of possibly cretaceous material I have found from these exposures, so it would be quite interesting if the general consensus is a Globidens sp. Your thoughts would be much appreciated! Thanks, Ash
  2. Hi all! I found this in the North Sulphur River this weekend in a large gravel bar. My first thought was that it was a Globidens Mosasaur tooth, but I’m just not sure. It’s approximately a half an inch diameter, has striations on the underside, and a hole in the center. The top side has been flattened, which if a tooth I am assuming is the chewing surface? Completely fossilized. No enamel. I would appreciate any input! Thank you so much!
  3. Hi, What are your opinions on this tooth? Overall the crown of it: Thanks
  4. Hi everyone, With this thread I wanted to start a discussion about what the feeding habits would be for most mosasaur species, how you think they would have fed. I personally love mosasaurs, they are one of my favorite prehistoric animals for a number of reasons and I’ve recently even bought my first Prognathodon jaw and I also live in an area that is not only known for their fossils but also for the discovery of mosasaurs. I’ve been doing a bit of reading lately about mosasaurs but I can’t really find anything difinitive on their feeding habits. Their diet yes. But exactly how they consumed their prey, not yet. I personally work with reptiles on a daily base, both with my job and with my hobby and I know quite a bit of different feeding behaviours with these animals. And as I was feeding the ball pythons (Python regius) at work I was kinda wondering, how would a large marine reptile like a mosasaurus eat? Would they just tear off chunks of meat like their closest living relatives the monitor lizards? Or would they perform deathroll like crocodiles do to tear of chunks of meat of their prey? Or when we talk about smaller prey, would they just swallow them whole like a snake does with it’s two lower jaws that can move independently, would a mosasaur be capable of that? Or would it be a mix of all those things or something entirely different? So I was just wondering what are your thoughts on the subject? I love to hear your theories and own finds and observations or if anyone ever read something in a scientific paper about the matter. I am dying to know your thoughts on the matter, as I want to learn as much as I can about these magnificent beasts!
  5. I bought this tooth from a fossil dealer in Utah 2 years ago. I then somehow after that time noticed a strange mark on the bottom of the tooth where it attaches to the root and that there’s a sand like line going across the middle of the tooth. Could this be repair or fabricated teeth I’m seeing?
  6. Father's Day gift

    GLOBIDENS AEGYPTICUS MOSASAUR TOOTH ON JAW BONE WITH STAND - MOROCCO and a Yeti cup.
  7. Possible Fish Tooth From Texas

    Found in north Fort Hood near Gatesville, TX next to the Leon River. Unsure of formation. *would love to know if anyone has that info* Resembles a fish tooth to me, but this one is MUCH larger than any I've ever found (in eastern NC where I live), plus this one seems to have a root attached. It's approximately 3.5cm standing tall, and the "root" is approximately 3cm at its widest point. Quarter is for size reference. I googled some globidens images (as someone suggested) but I have not seen any that precisely match my specimen. For instance, mine does not have any indication of a point or tip. The "enamel" is also completely smooth, and lacks any evidence of striations which were evident in the googled images. It could be, of course, that maybe my specimen is just extremely worn. Any input is much appreciated!
  8. Hi guys, What is your opinion about this tooth? I think it is a real one, no fractures and no covering matrix. But maybe the experts see some red flags.
  9. I bought this partial, very partial, jaw of a mosasaur a few years ago at a very good price. It's from Morocco. No offense to anyone, but I'm always suspect of Moroccan fossils, but it was cheap. This was covered in their famous sand/glue matrix. So tonight i decided to clean it up and do away with most of the sand, and what i found was surprising! See anything wrong with this picture? I uncovered two pits with replacement teeth that were filled with sand. Awesome! BUT they're pointed!! Lol!!! Oh, silly Moroccans. So i popped off a impostor Globidens tooth. Sure enough, it was held on by a white/cream putty. Then i cleaned the putty off of the broken root and globidens tooth. Now, here's my question. Is there a way to determine a species by their replacement teeth? Or does anyone have a good idea which species this may be from the root shape? I'd like to find two correct species teeth to add to this piece to make a composite. I appreicate and thank you for any help. Merry (almost) Christmas.
  10. Deinosuchus ?

    Found last week in SE North Carolina, Campanian,Tar Heel formation. I was thinking Deinosuchus but has globidens characteristics also. total length is 2 in., Dia. is 1in. 1/2 in round cavity, length of enamel alone is 7/8 in. Can someone confirm what it is? Thanks
  11. Hello members I'd quite like a globiden tooth. I have some small pterosurid teeth from Kem Kem to exchange.
  12. Globidens tooth

    Tooth of a Globidensine mosasaur.
  13. Globidens Jaw: Results

    Hello! So after receiving my Jaw I deconstructed it and it's matrix, and I must say I got quite the surprise! *5 Shark Teeth *4 Unknown Teeth *Countless Broken fish vertebrae *Crystals growing inside one of the jawbones *A Few pieces of jaw If anyone can ID anything please do!
  14. Globidens Jaw

    Hello, I have turned up a treasure in search of a mosasaur jaw in the United kingdom, I recently bought it, and the seller was very honest, and identified the roots as fake, but the teeth and jaw as genuine. I spotted those, but I require a second opinion just for that stability feeling, and the fact that maybe I and the seller missed something. This fossil is my second, my first being a pachycephalosaur hand claw, which needs prep. Also would the jaw fit together if I mined it out of the matrix? Thank you everyone for your interest and friendliness.
  15. I purchased this fossil Globidens jaw fragment at a Gem and Mineral Show about a month ago. The crown of the tooth appears to be real, as does the jaw bone. Being cautious of Moroccan fakes, I made sure not to pay too much for the piece. While the individual parts appear to be genuine, I have noticed repair marks and markings that suggest the tooth may be composited onto the root. Any opinions or insight into the matter would be greatly appreciated. Thanks! - Geoff
  16. Globidens Fragment

    I am in the middle of prep on a rooted Globidens anterior, rooted tooth. The root surface is seen at the upper right portion of the photo. The matrix is full of pinhead to pea sized bone fragments. This larger and unusually textured fragment is the exception. The exposed portion of the carbide needle, shown for scale, is 1". The fragment is a little better than 1mm thick. Given the rugose surface, does anyone have an idea what structure it may be a fragment of. Thanks for looking.
  17. I was poking around in a Texas site looking for my very own Mastadon Molar, with which CreekCrawler has so recently shamed us all. I did not find any elephant parts, but I did find a pretty cool Pliestocene Equus tooth - cheek tooth I think. Does anyone have a link to a good Pleistocene/Oligocene/Miocene Mammal tooth website or a good reference book? In Situ Reverse side Top pattern Huge Squali This is the most complete Globidens tooth I have found - about 75% there. Most of the back is missing unfortunately. One Crab that may have a pincher intact. I will explore the matrix later. Happy fossiling! Jon
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