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Found 8 results

  1. Three glossopteris leaves

    I found this fossil in Newcastle, Australia. I believe it is three glossopteris leaves and some fragmenary material. Is this correct?
  2. These are some fossil glossopteris leaves from different beaches around the Newcastle area. The rocks they are found in tend to be very hard to break, but yield lovely fossils. Good luck!
  3. Five New Fossil Forests Found in Antarctica Hundreds of millions of years ago, Antarctica was carpeted with prehistoric greenery. Now, scientists may have uncovered clues about what happened in the "Great Dying," or Permian extinction. National Geographic https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/03/antarctica-fossil-forest-discovery-permian-spd/ A related paper is: Taylor, E.L., Taylor, T.N. and CĂșneo, N.R., 1992. The present is not the key to the past: a polar forest from the Permian of Antarctica. Science, 257(5077), pp. 1675-1677. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/5999746_The_Present_Is_Not_the_Key_to_the_Past_A_Polar_Forest_from_the_Permian_of_Antarctica https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ruben_Cuneo/2 https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ruben_Cuneo Yours, Paul H.
  4. Possible permian insect wing?

    G'day, I was recently splitting some leftovers from the Belmont insect beds (Permian) from NSW, Australia and I found what appears to be an insect wing. Its preserved differently than the Glossopteris in the formation with a shiny surface (not visible in photos). But I thought it could also be half of a glossopteris leaf. So, any ideas? (I am referring to the dark shape just above the ruler)
  5. Hi, Recently been shown a couple of mineralised, silicified?? ( hardness 6.5 ), fossils that are a bit unusual and might be of interest. They were found in alluvial gravel at Tomahawk Creek, near Rubyvale, Queensland. I have been unable to access Geological Map ( Emerald SF 55-15 ?? ) on line, any directions, link or geological info ( formation, age) would be appreciated. I believe Rubyvale lies in the Bowan Basin, which is late Permian, about 255Ma. The first one appears to be Plumsteadia, a Glossopterid fruit. The seeds have been shed, leaving small recesses where they were attached. "Fruits consist of a receptacle or core with seeds attached to it (all around it, if it is spherical or cylindrical; possibly only to one side in examples where there has been a flattening and fusion of parts). ( Mary White, 1988, Australia's Fossil Plants ) The second looks very much like a section of Vertebraria, Glossopterid root. "...show a segmented structure when fossilised. They look much like vertebral columns , or backbones...... The structure is believed to be an adaptation for aeration of tissues, necessary in the waterlogged habitats of swamps." ( Mary White, 1988, Australia's Fossil Plants ) Cheers, Mike
  6. Glossopteris

    From the album WhodamanHD's Fossil collection.

    A glossopteris fossil I bought from UKGE. From Australia.
  7. Hi, I'm mike. I have been reading forum posts for a while now, thought I'd join to share and learn.. I became aware of the local geological features late in life, but now have more time for rock kicking. The Newcastle coastline has many , easily accessible, points of interest, volcanic dykes, faults, petrified trees, fossils and exposures. They are in the stratigraphy of the Newcastle Coal Measures, Northern Sydney Basin, late Permian 252-255 Ma. The majority of preservations are Glossopterids but also horsetails, cordaites and ferns. Maybe not as spectacular as dinosaur bones, but interesting all the same. I recently picked up a couple of specimens at a local rock platform that might be of interest. The names and classification are a bit confusing to me, but I've tried to ID them using Mary White's Greening of Gondwana and Australian Fossil Plants, and quote her descriptions. Please indicate any errors! Photo 1 (..637) Palaeovitiaria, ( glossopterid leaf ), no mid rib, no medium groove and the veins are almost parallel with few cross connections. Photo 2 (..644) On the left, glossopteris leaf, prolific in the area, On the right, Umbellaphyllites ivinii, a horsetail ( arthrophytes ) with leaf sheath segments completely fused, like a little umbrella. Photo 3 & 4 (..641 & ..642) Both sides of a typical fossiliferous rock found adjacent to the coal seams, a compressed mass of various leaves and stems. This example has been mineralised (grey siderite??) , but has not completely "rusted" thru to form a red/brown limonite ?? Regards, mike.
  8. Hi all, During Permian times, the Glossopterids constituted the major/characteristic component of many Gondwanan floras. This certainly also holds for the floras of the Illawarra Coal Measures, from which I have a couple of plates. However, it doesn't mean no other plant types occurred in these Permian forests, of course, they are just less common. While examining one of my plates, I noticed something "different" and after a bit of cleaning, this is what I found. My very first specimen from a so-called Glossopteris-flora which is definitely not a Glossopterid species. Probably, this is a partial frond of Neomariopteris, though I still have to double-check this preliminary ID (waiting for the library to provide me with the books I need - these are momentarily still in storage). Alternatively, it could be a Sphenopterid of some sort. Just wanted to show this new "find", Cheers, Tim
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