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Found 22 results

  1. Today we had a field trip with the "Lithos" geology club at my favorite hunting spot. Although the day started with freezing temperatures, the sun quickly rose the temperatures during t morning and gave us a beautiful day. the last time I visited the quarry the finds were disapointing due to the lack of activity in the quarry, but today we were lucky and the past week a new acces road was being dug to the side of the quarry, straight through the Matagne slate. It didnt take long before I found my first fossils, at first a few halve goniatites, but after a while a complete large specimen and a nautiloid that I had never seen before at this locaton. we searched further in the quarry where we found the spot where the rest of the slate was dumped, resulting in a couple extra goniatites, one of them was an exquisite specimen and a 2nd nautiloid. Note that al the goniatites this time weren't Manticoceras specimens, but an other Gephuroceratinae: Crickites sp. they differ from the former with a more bulbous shape and large size ( up to 30cm in diameter ) In the afternoon we prospected the usual scree piles at the back of the quarry where we found a multitude of small pyritised cephalopods and I even found a broken nodule with very rare placoderm remains. Natalie also found a large and complete Crickites sp. at this spot This day turned out to be one of my most productive days at this location.
  2. This all started over a year ago. I was selected as Member of the Month and a couple of TFF members from Texas invited me down to the big state to collect. I primarily collect in my home region, the northeast, but I've taken fossil forays to New Mexico, Kentucky, and Germany and was willing to consider a trip to Texas and the opportunity to visit some classic fossil sites and collect fossils that are outside my usual focus. I began planning this about ten months ago, contacted potential fossil collecting partners and did my own research on fossil sites, geology, and the types of fossils I would likely encounter. I had never been to Texas let alone fossil collected there. From the Forum I knew there was a lot of great hunting. Then there was all of the logistics, what to stay, what to bring. Since I wanted to bring back a lot driving appeared to be my best option, but I hadn't driven that far solo in over thirty years. Timing of my trip; mid-late September, came right after my daughter went away to college and I was in the middle of moving to a new place. So things couldn't have been more hectic. Finally, early in the morning on September 8th I set out. Things went okay until I was in Kentucky. Just as it was turning nightfall, torrential rain hit, traffic was stopped on the interstate for two and a half hours, and the last two hours of the trip I struggled with wet conditions and poor visibility. I finally arrived at my parents' house just after one in the morning. The next day on my way over to my sister's I took a small detour and stopped at an outcrop I was well familiar with in Leitchfield, the Upper Mississippian Glen Dean Formation.
  3. PDF Request

    Does anyone have a PDF copy of this paper and are willing to send it to me? If so, please PM me. V. E. Ruzhentsev and M. F. Bogoslovskaya. 1971. Namurskiy etap v evolyutsii ammonoidey. Rannenamyurskie ammonoidei. Akademiya Nauk SSSR, Trudy Paleontologicheskogo Instituta 133:1-382
  4. From the album Middle Devonian

    Tornoceras uniangulare (goniatites preserved in pyrite) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Pyrite Bed Hamilton Group Penn Dixie Quarry Blasdell, N.Y.
  5. Goniatite ID

    I found these two when I was a child in Orange County, NY. Does anyone have an ID? From what I can tell, they're Goniatites. I can post more pictures if these aren't clear enough. Thanks! Here are the pictures. For some reason, it's not letting me upload them here. https://imgur.com/a/tRRAfi1#BtnFMPp
  6. Last saturday my girlfriend and I went back to the south of Belgium to go hunt for my favorite fossils. On the way there we saw a new road under construction where cretaceous chalk was visible. We made a quick stop to chek it out, but we only found 2 bellemnite fragments. So we hit the road again to the devonian rocks. The weather was quite good for this time of the year, so it was no suprise to see some fellow fossil and mineral hunters on the site. Some new heaps on the side of the field got my attention. Here I made my first good find of the day. A goniatite anaptychus. I was missing this in my collection. So I was verry pleased with it. The rest of the morning most of the finds were made in situ by Natalie, 2 decent sized Manticoceras and 2 Carinoceras specimens. She also managed to find a trilobite fragment. Also the first trillo adition from this quarry to our collection. At noon we were joined on our hunt by a friend. We then got to the large dirt pile at the end of the quarry whera a few other people were looking for smal pyritised cephalopods. After a few chats with the other fossil hunters about the cephalopod fauna the showed me a huge Goniatite they found earlyer that day. I had rarely seen a specimen like this. My surprise was even greater when they offerd this specimen for my collection since I specialise in this kind of fossils. Again lots of thanks if that person reads this thread, it wil get well deserved attention and preparation. The rest of the day we spent on the large mound picking up various fossils but my find of the day here was a incredible crinoid calyx. The trip turned out to be one of my best on this location. Cheers. Manticocerasman I'll upload the photos in the next post
  7. Goniatites Ammonite a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Goniatites Fossil SITE LOCATION: Morocco TIME PERIOD: Middle Devonian to Permian - (390-139 million years ago) Data: Goniatids, informally Goniatites, are ammonoid cephalopods that form the Order Goniatiida, derived from the more primitive Anarcestida during the Middle Devonian some 390 million years ago. Goniatites (goniatitida) survived the Late Devonian extinction to flourish during the Carboniferous and Permian only to become extinct at the end of the Permian some 139 million years later. All goniatites possessed an external shell, which is divided internally into chambers filled with gas giving it Buoyancy during the life of the animal. An open chamber at the front of the shell provided living space for the goniatitid animal, with access to open water through an aperture. The general morphology and habit of goniatites was probably similar to that of their later relatives the ammonites, being free swimming and possessing a head with two well developed eyes and arms (or tentacles). Goniatites is a genus of extinct cephalopods belonging to the family Goniatitidae, included in the superfamily Goniatitaceae. Beyrichoceras and Cravenoceras are among related genera. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Order: †Ammonoidea Family: †Goniatitida Genus: †Goniatites
  8. Goniatites Ammonite a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Goniatites Fossil SITE LOCATION: Morocco TIME PERIOD: Middle Devonian to Permian - (390-139 million years ago) Data: Goniatids, informally Goniatites, are ammonoid cephalopods that form the Order Goniatiida, derived from the more primitive Anarcestida during the Middle Devonian some 390 million years ago. Goniatites (goniatitida) survived the Late Devonian extinction to flourish during the Carboniferous and Permian only to become extinct at the end of the Permian some 139 million years later. All goniatites possessed an external shell, which is divided internally into chambers filled with gas giving it Buoyancy during the life of the animal. An open chamber at the front of the shell provided living space for the goniatitid animal, with access to open water through an aperture. The general morphology and habit of goniatites was probably similar to that of their later relatives the ammonites, being free swimming and possessing a head with two well developed eyes and arms (or tentacles). Goniatites is a genus of extinct cephalopods belonging to the family Goniatitidae, included in the superfamily Goniatitaceae. Beyrichoceras and Cravenoceras are among related genera. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Order: †Ammonoidea Family: †Goniatitida Genus: †Goniatites
  9. Just looking to hear some opinions on the following pictures for a piece I was looking to buy. Thank you in advance for input!
  10. Devonian Goniatite from Albany Co., NY.

    From the album Middle Devonian

    Tornoceras mosopleuron (goniatite) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Dave Elliot Bed Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Hannacroix Ravine Clarksville, NY.
  11. Devonian Goniatite from Albany Co., NY.

    From the album Middle Devonian

    Tornoceras mosopleuron (goniatite) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Dave Elliot Bed Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Hannacroix Ravine Clarksville, NY.
  12. not burning down the house

    large file Might be gone soon http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/royptb/250/763/79.full.pdf
  13. Found these, my first Pennsylvanian Age marine fossils in calcareous shale in a road cut in western Pennsylvania on a recent trip. According to the Fossil Collecting in Pennsylvania guide, the formation is the Ames Limestone. Any help with IDs would be greatly appreciated. Thanks. 1.)
  14. Tornoceras goniatite from Madison Co., N.Y.

    From the album Middle Devonian

    Tornoceras sp. (goniatite) Middle Devonian Upper Ludlowville Formaion Hamilton Group Geer Road Quarry Lebanon, NY. collected 8/24/15
  15. From the album Middle Devonian

    Tornoceras sp. (goniatite) Middle Devonian Windom Shale Moscow Formation Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road quarry Lebanon, NY. collected 7/13/15
  16. From the album Middle Devonian

    Tornoceras sp. (goniatite) Middle Devonian Windom Shale Moscow Formation Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road quarry Lebanon, NY. collected 6/22/15
  17. From the album Middle Devonian

    Tornoceras sp. (goniatite) Middle Devonian Windom Shale Moscow Formation Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road quarry Lebanon, NY. collected 5/23/15
  18. From the album Middle Devonian

    Tornoceras sp. (Goniatite) Middle Devonian Windom Shale Moscow formation Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road quarry Lebanon, NY. Collected 5/3-5/4/15
  19. Tornoceras Goniatite

    From the album Middle Devonian

    Tornoceras mosopleuron (goniatite with bivalve imprint) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Dave Elliot Bed Hamilton Group Route 209 Roadcut Kingston, NY
  20. Tornoceras Goniatite

    From the album Middle Devonian

    Tornoceras mosopleuron (goniatite) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Dave Elliot Bed Hamilton Group Route 209 Roadcut Kingston, NY
  21. Last Wednesday was a sweltering 94 degree high humidity day. I had an appointment in the area and couldn't help checking out a favorite site; the Dave Elliot bed on Route 209 just west of Kingston, NY. The bed is highly fossiliferous silty sandstone, just a few inches thick in an exposure that's 30 to 40 feet high. The bed is Middle Devonian age with tiny bivalves and cephalopods dominant. I spent a total of three hours chipping away hunks of rock from the crumbly cliff and had my best day there so far: seven complete or nearly complete goniatite ammonoids, Tornoceras mesopleuron. a three and a half inch nearly complete straight-shelled nautiloid, Michelinoceras sp.?, five Eumetabolotoechia brachiopods (normally I just find one or two per day), a tiny spiriferoid brachiopod (unidentified) I've never found at this site before, bivalves, Nuculites sp.?, the twig of a fossil plant, and two other unidentified fossils. The day was well worth it, despite the heat. The unidentified fossils I'll show Dr. Bartholomew, professor of paleontology and stratigraphy at the State University near where I live. Dr. Bartholomew is doing an extensive study of the Dave Elliot Bed in eastern New York. The Dave Elliot fauna here in Kingston is similar to the fossils from Hannacroix Ravine except that brachiopods are rarer at Hannacroix. The presence of well preserved fossil plants in marine sediments would suggest the presence of a nearby river that carried their remains from some terrestrial habitat. The absence of corals and relatively low species diversity also suggests the water contained a large ammount of sediment making it hospitable to only those creatures who could adapt to this cloudy environment. Finding fossils, especially cephalopods, and speculating on what the prehistoric environment was like is a great source of fascination for me. I try to get there whenever I have a chance. Less than a mile north of here, also on Route 209 is another even older Middle Devonian fossil bed that produces abundant spiriferoid brachiopods and rugose corals, and about a mile and half west is a site where spirifers and occasional bivales and cephalopods can be found.
  22. Last Friday I visited the Helderberg Plateau southwest of Albany NY for the first time in search of Middle Devonian fauna. In a thin bed of dark gray silty sandstone in one of the cliffs along Hannacroix Creek, preliminarily called the Hannacroix Ravine Bed, I collected numerous ammonoids, straight-shelled nautiloids, tiny bivalves, and plants. Brachiopods are rarely found in this bed and none were found that day. The fauna was similar to those I've found in the Dave Elliot bed exposed along Route 209 just west of Kingston, NY except that complete ammonoids appear more abundant here. The ammonoids are the goniatite, Tornoceras mesopleuron. I found three nearly complete individuals roughly about an inch in diameter and two smaller ones, one less than an eighth of an inch, as well as numerous partial specimens. One slab contained three large partial specimens lying side by side. Could only upload one photo taken from my cellphone. Any suggestions on to how to upload the rest?
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