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Found 11 results

  1. I've shown these before replica builds from the Black Hills Institute. This is a Gorgosaurus and all the commentary and photos are from Pete Larsen Begin mounting a cast of the Gorgosaurus nov. sp. the original is at The Childrens Museum of Indianapolis. This is one of my favorite Tyrannosaur skeletons. This one goes to Masashi Tanaka. Making progress on the Gorgosaurus skeleton. Every time I pickup a cast bone to mount I check to see if I missed any pathologies. This was one messed up dinosaur Finished mounting the vertebrae, looks like ribs are on for tomorrow. Did get a bit done on the Gorgosaurus ribs today, including putting steel in dorsal ribs 1&4 and the scapula-coracoids. Finished mounting the rest of the tail of the Gorgosaurus, adding the chevrons. One of the reasons this Gorgosaurus is such an awesome skeleton, is the painful plethora of healed injuries. The tail of this beast has a nice one. Notice that caudals 4 and 5 are fused. Looking more closely you can see that the common chevron is also fused to the vertebral centra. This is just the location one might expect to see a copulation injury. Add, yes, this is a robust individual (female). Just added the Ethmoid complex to the braincase of the Gorgosaurus. This is the perfect specimen to demonstrate what it is and where it is, because we are using a white brain-case. The ethmoid complex and the rest of the skull are poured in dark grey. Through the left orbit, you can see the dark ethmoid complex against the white polyurethane of the rest of the brain-case. Looking up at the roof of the skull, you can see the ethmoid complex and the portals that connect the olfactory loves to the rest of the brain. The olfactory lobe in tyrannosaurs presses against the frontals and is more than half the total volume of the brain.
  2. A while back, I received a package from our good friend Adam, better known as @Tidgy's Dad. In said package was a small plastic dinosaur that had apparently been gifted to him by none other than @JohnBrewer. This means that this little fella had started his journey in England, made his way to Morocco, and had since travelled to the United States. It was decided after careful consideration that his name was to be Gorgeous George the Globetrotting Gorgosaurus. Now he is traveling the globe spreading joy and cheer to members of TFF! If you are fortunate enough to play host to Gorgeous George, here are the rules: 1. George must be photographed in his host's collection. 2. He must then be sent to an unsuspecting TFF-er along with any trade. (You can't notify the recipient that they are getting him, he must be an unannounced visitor!) 3. He should be accompanied by a note in case the recipient is not familiar with proper Globetrotting Gorgosaurus procedure. 4. In order to increase the odds of surprising his new host, his visit photo should be uploaded only AFTER he has been received at his new temporary home. *NOTE: The hope is that in addition to having fun, this will also give members the chance to share their collections and have their prizes be seen. That being said, he must be photographed with his host collection. This does not mean that he cannot also take field trips to collecting sites and other landmarks and be photographed there as well! (Thank you to @DPS Ammonite for the suggestions!) Let's see how many miles we can put on this little plastic dino! Don't forget to have fun!
  3. Hi All I am open to trading my following theropod teeth. I have attached a couple of images of each teeth along with info on the size and locality etc. Please PM me for more info and images/offers if interested. EDIT - I am after other theropod teeth in return Paul
  4. theropodaexpeditions.com

    I found this website that has some fantastic photos of dinosaur bones. Definitely worth a look. Great for reference. http://www.theropodaexpeditions.com/ Some examples
  5. 3D Skull of Gorgosaurus

    Witmer Labs requested the ROM's 3D model of the tyrannosaurid dinosaur Gorgosaurus (ROM 1247) for use in the Smithsonian's NMNH new dinosaur hall. Link attached if your interested in viewing it. https://sketchfab.com/models/bcc4f64edc93403ea006897cbba6da22 Witmer Labs used it as part of our 2009 study of tyrannosaur braincase, brain, ear, & air sinus evolution: The study looked at the braincase of Gorgosaurus, Trex and the Cleveland Nanotyrannus skull. Link is attached. Interesting paper if you have not see it, concluded that the Clevelend Nanotyrannus braincase is " Perhaps the most remarkable attribute of the braincase of CMNH 7541 is simply how different it is, and not just from T. rex, but also from other tyrannosaurs. As just noted, the entire skull and endocast are unique among tyrannosaurs in being very strongly down-turned. Aspects of the cranial endocast are very unusual, such as the rostrally offset pituitary fossa and orbital cranial nerves." (link: http://bit.ly/2BoKIfx) bit.ly/2BoKIfx
  6. Wear facets, spalling and split carinae are typical features you see on Tyrannosaurid teeth that add character and mystery to these teeth. Here are two papers that examine these features. Wear Facets Lambe (1917) noted wear surfaces on the side faces of tyrannosaurid lateral teeth from the Red Deer River deposits of western Canada. He wrote “as the upper teeth closed outside those of the mandible any wear, not on the point, would result from the contact of the inner surface of the upper teeth with the outer surface of the lower ones.” Recent work, has, however, challenged this assertion, suggesting that the shapes, locations, and incidences of tyrannosaurid wear surfaces are not indicative of tooth−tooth contact (Farlow and Brinkman 1994; Molnar 1998; Jacobsen 1996, 2003). Here the paper reevaluates this evidence by examining wearstriations in tyrannosaurid lateral teeth in addition to the shapes and locations of their wear surfaces. Wear facets and enamel spalling in tyrannosaurid dinosaurs Blaine W. Schubert and Peter S. Ungar Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 50 (1), 2005: 93-99 app50-093.pdf Split Carina 11% of the teeth studied in the paper exhibited this trait. Trauma, aberrant tooth replacement, or genetic factors may have led to the development of split carinae. The paper concluded that although not conclusive genetic factors get the most support but additional study is needed. Other factors like nutrition may play a part but the paper points out is not testable. Pay walled Split Carinae on Tyrannosaurid Teeth and Implications of Their Development Gregory M. Erickson Pages 268-274 | Received 14 Jun 1993, Accepted 17 Jan 1994, Published online: 24 Aug 2 https://doi.org/10.1080/02724634.1995.10011229 From my collection
  7. Judith River Tyrannosaur

    From the album Dinosaurs and Reptiles

    30 mm nicely preserved tyrannosaur tooth. As I understand, it is impossible to distinguish between Gorgosaurus, Daspletosaurus and Albertosaurus from Judith River Fm.
  8. Indianapolis Children's Museum

    Hello, I was stopping through Indianapolis and gave their children's museum a try. It was surprisingly enjoyable! The museum covered topics from agriculture to racing to dinosaurs! These photos are from the dinosaur section. I followed the signs to the Dinosphere. I walked through the entrance and down the ramp. At the end of the ramp was a Sarcosuchus cast (no picture sorry). Following the path I emerged into a huge planetarium like structure filled with dinosaurs.
  9. I find it interesting when I see Tyrannosaurid material for sale, from the Judith River of Montana, that so little is understood of what actually is being offered. Most sellers call their specimen either Daspletosaurus or Albertosaurus and a few, when it comes to teeth, properly identify them as Tyrannosaurid indet. Very few will label anything Gorgosaurus unless it's really small. Yet none of these Tyrannosaurids have been described from this fauna and Albertosaurus may not even be represented. So what is currently known with the major Tyrannosaurids. I've tried to look around and gather what information is available and put it together in its simplest form so it's understood, if there are missteps let me know. Sorry, it's from my narrow collector perspective Let me prefix this by saying this is an area that is constantly evolving based with new discoveries and research. Papers just a few years old can already be obsolete and views are changing. The other issue is that since so little material has been discovered in some strata that there may not be consensus among paleontologist but thats not new and we also know that their ego's run high. Not here to debate anything. Tyrannosaurids Described by age/strata: Late Maastrichtian deposits 69 - 66 mya (Lance/HellCreek/Scollard Formations et al. ) Tyrannosaurus rex Nanotyrannus lancensis Very Late Campanian / Mid Maastrichtian deposits 73 -67 mya (Horseshoe Canyon Formation) Albertosaurus sarcophagus Late Campanian deposits 75.1 - 74.4 mya (Two Medicine Formation) Daspletosaurus horneri (just described) (this is described just at the very end of the TM FM not all, age of deposit where collected is very important) Mid Campanian deposits 76.6 - 75.1mya (Two Medicine Formation) Gorgosaurus sp. does exist not nammed Mid Campanian deposits 76.7 - 75.2 mya (Belly River Group) Daspletosaurus torosus Mid Campanian deposits 76.7 - 75.1 mya (Dinosaur Park Formation) Gorgosaurus libratus What is important to note is that no Tyrannosaurid's have been described from the Judith River Formation (80-75 mya) of Montana. Since the stratigraphy is similiar to that of eastern Alberta it's fair to assume the Tyrannosaurids like Daspletosaurus and Gorgosaurus would be present but not Albertosaurus which is younger in age. A note from an article I read stated that Albertosaurus and Daspletosaurus are stratigraphically separate, with the former from the late Campanian to Maastrichtian Horseshoe Canyon Formation, and the latter coming from the middle Campanian Belly River Group. Additional discoveries and research will determine if this holds up. So as a collector you need to take a look at what you have labeled and some may need to be updated and keep this in mind with your next acquisition. Remember when trying to acquire tyrannosaurid material don't get hung up on the name, focus on the bone or tooth since it will be with you forever while names can change. Chart clearly showing the distribution by age (the Two Medicine Taxon is now D. horneri) Tyrant Dinosaur Evolution Tracks the Rise and Fall of Late Cretaceous Oceans Mark A. Loewen1*, Randall B. Irmis1, Joseph J. W. Sertich2, Philip J. Currie3, Scott D. Sampson1 PDF: journal.pone.0079420.PDF Carr's Blog (Chart) http://tyrannosauroideacentral.blogspot.com/2017/04/introducing-daspletosaurus-horneri-two.html?m=0 This is an FYI: Appalachiosaurus montgomeriensis no longer considered a Tyrannosaurid but a basal Tyrannosauroid if that's really important or relevant to collectors. (PDF from above)
  10. Fossil Collection 2015 Right Shelf Overview

    From the album Various

    Right shelf

    © &copy Olof Moleman

  11. Tyrannosaurs Teeth Collection

    From the album Dinosaur Fossils collection

    Collection of North American Tyrannosaur teeth: T-Rex, Daspletosaurus, Gorgosaurus, Nanotyrannus, Albertosaurus and Aublysodon
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