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Found 5 results

  1. Likely some have already seen this, a nice little video on coprolites, what we can learn from them and their significance. Being a post from me, the video of course covers the Two Medicine Formation, I know at least @GeschWhat will enjoy. https://www.facebook.com/scifrimacroscope/videos/986351528231150/
  2. Book: Hadrosaurs

    I had this book in my library since it was published in 2014. If your interested in having a good hadrosaur reference source I can recommend this book. Its full of illustrations and good info from key paleontologists. Its a big book $62 USD on Amazon What triggered this topic was just article which reviewed the book https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/eberth-and-evans-hadrosaurs-a-book-review-part-1/
  3. Old paper but new to me thought it might be interesting to those who have not seen it. How did hadrosaurs orient their hands? It's different than you might think based on many museum mounts https://t.co/RMzQO4eUk5?amp=1
  4. Hadrosaur Symposium Book

    While browsing the publications webpage of David Evans (http://evanslab.wordpress.com/publications/), I happened to come upon a stream of in-papers to be published in a forthcoming book on hadrosaurs based on the results of the 2011 Hadrosaur Symposium in Canada. As it stands, there are handful of new developments regarding hadrosaur systematics and evolution: New hadrosauroid from Mongolia (Tsogtbaatar et. al., accepted). A primitive hadrosauroid from Mongolia (including specimens catalogued in museum collections as Arstanosaurus sp.) has been mentioned and discussed in the literature with regards to Mongolian dinos, but has not yet been described as a new genus and species. Maybe it could be the dinosaur mentioned as under description by David Norman in the book Age of Dinosaurs in Russia and Mongolia. Hadrosaur material from the Santonian Milk River Formation of Canada (Larson et. al., accepted). The recent description of Huehuecanauhtlus from Mexico is starting to fill a gap in the fossil record of Santonian-early Campanian hadrosaurs from western North America, as Claosaurus is the only other hadrosaur genus from the Coniacian-early Campanian interval. As is stands, hadrosauroid material has been recovered from other Santonian-age formations in western North America including the Menefee Formation in New Mexico, so the description of hadrosauroid remains from the Milk River Formation will further shed light on hadrosauroid evolution in North America during the Santonian. Re-assessment of putative hadrosaurids from mid-Cretaceous UK (Barrett et. al., accepted). "Trachodon" cantabrigiensis and "Iguanodon" hilli have been considered hadrosaurids in some discussions of hadrosaurid evolution but the absence of true hadrosaurs in England has raised questions about whether or not they are true hadrosaurids. As these taxa were found in marine deposits, it's possible that some undiscovered hadrosauroid in Africa or mainland Europe could be the source of the remains named T. cantabrigiensis and I. hilli. Just as 2010 was the festival of the horned dinosaurs with the book New Perspectives on Horned Dinosaurs, 2014 may be the festival of the hadrosaurs if the book "The Hadrosaurs: Proceedings of the International Hadrosaur Symposium" is published in 2014. Stay tuned! Tsogtbaatar, K., D. Weishampel, D. C. Evans, and M. Watabe. (accepted). A new hadrosauroid (Plesiohadros djadokhtaensis) from the Late Cretaceous Djadokhtan fauna of southern Mongolia. In The Hadrosaurs: Proceedings of the International Hadrosaur Symposium (D. A. Eberth and D. C. Evans, eds), Indiana University Press, Bloomington. Larson, D., N. E. Campione, C. M. Brown, D. C. Evans, and M. J. Ryan. (accepted). Hadrosauroid material from the Santonian Milk River Formation of southern Alberta, Canada. In The Hadrosaurs: Proceedings of the International Hadrosaur Symposium (D. A. Eberth and D. C. Evans, eds), Indiana University Press, Bloomington. Barrett, P., D. C. Evans, and J J. Head. (Accepted). A re-evaluation of purported hadrosaurid dinosaur specimens from the ‘middle’ Cretaceous of England In The Hadrosaurs: Proceedings of the International Hadrosaur Symposium (D. A. Eberth and D. C. Evans, eds), Indiana University Press, Bloomington.
  5. Duck-Billed Dinosaurs Endured Long, Dark Polar Winters, ScienceDaily, April 11, 2012 http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120411131915.htm http://scienceblog.com/53228/duck-billed-dinosaurs-endured-long-dark-polar-winters/ Duck-billed dinosaurs endured long, dark polar winters by Preston Moretz, April 10, 2012 http://news.temple.edu/news/2012-04-10/duck-billed-dinosaurs-endured-long-dark-polar-winters The paper is: Chinsamy, A., D. B. Thomas, A. R. Tumarkin- Deratzian, and A. R. Fiorillo, 2010, Hadrosaurs Were Perennial Polar Residents. The Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology. vol. 295, no. 4, pp. 610–614. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.22428/abstract Yours, Paul H.
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